Jump to content
bryanc

HMS Bounty by bryanc - Artesania Latina - Scale 1:48

Recommended Posts

Open the box!

 

First impressions; Artesania Latina do not appear to have the best of reputations, and on doing research, to find out that the Bounty kit is only single plank on frame rather than the more acceptable double planking, didn't help that reputation. Aparently the manuals weren't up to much either, badly translated for one thing (AL are Italian of course), and I did come across veiled suggestions the kit quality had a lot to be desired.

 

However the ship had already been ordered, a gift from my children, so there was no going back, the box arrived...

 

post-17543-0-21091300-1438001351_thumb.jpg

 

...and what an impressive box it was to! 30 x 17 x 2.5 inches (76 x 43 x 7 cms) and heavy with it. On opening the box, I couldn't help but be quite impressed. At the top of the pile was a package containing the manuals (yes two!) and the drawings. The manuals were relatively impressive, the first was a full colour and seemingly very detailed book containing a host of photographs each part in each photograph numbered. The second manual was the instruction booklet (in several languages). Each paragraph in the manual makes reference to each photograph, thereby illustrating every step, but how accurately remains to be seen.

 

post-17543-0-80434800-1438003063_thumb.jpg

 

post-17543-0-17431000-1438003085_thumb.jpg

 

So far, quite impressed. I was then shocked to discover how huge the actual scale drawings were! Given the box is 30 inches long, the size of the drawing is indicated in the photograph below. There are three sheets, but each has content on both sides, and very detailed content it appears to be. So far very impressed.

 

post-17543-0-29080100-1438003103_thumb.jpg

 

Then the rest of the contents. The usual laser cut sheets of different thicknesses of wood, all seemingly excellent quality, and the wooden strips and dowling. It became obvious the ship only has single planking, as the obvious keel planking strips seemed relatively few. The other contents included all the many bits and pieces, all neat and tidy in individual plastic trays rather than plastic bags! I later discovered these trays are actually quite robust and reusable, which should prove very handy. The qualty of the components, especially the turned brass ones, appeared excellent.

 

Still impressed!

 

post-17543-0-07693200-1438003122_thumb.jpg

 

Eventually I did make a start on the build. As I was still finishing my previous ship, I only undertook this because the instructions recommended, for absolute realism, the first keel items should be stained and varnished before being built, and I could continue with my original ship as this was drying. As it transpired I have elected to paint then varnish, as the stain didn't cover the imperfections of the wood. As the painting / varnishing could be done after the initial bit of build, I did actually commence.

 

The pIeces; false keel and first frames, were removed from their sheet easier than any I have come across before, and the quality seems very good indeed. The frames all fitted into the keel well. Now to paint and varnish.

 

post-17543-0-14269200-1438003179_thumb.jpg

 

Bryan

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian.

You have made a nice start on the build.

I have this kit to build but need to compleat other projects first.

Will watch as you build..

 

Regards Antony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian.

You have made a nice start on the build.

I have this kit to build but need to compleat other projects first.

Will watch as you build..

 

Regards Antony.

Hi Anthony,

 

Thanks for that. I have continued with the build, somewhat guiltily as my last ship, The Supply, isn't quite finished, but I am enjoying The Bounty so much I cannot resist. I'll say a lot more later, but thus far I am amazed at the high quality of the materials and the quality of the build. Much more later.

Thanks,

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like you have a good start, appears as though there will be lots of frames to glue to so hopefully one layer of planking will work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

You have made a great start to your kit.

I also have this kit on my shelf and it will possibly be my next build after I finish the Victory bow section

I will follow your progress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just discovered your this build log and will follow it closely. I've got a build log of this same Bounty kit going. I'm into it for the same reason you are -- a gift from someone. I too was impressed by the

plans, instructions and pictures....until they petered out just when you start needing explanations and close up pictures the most. I think AL is Spanish, not Italian but I may be wrong. The translations are not as good as you'd imagine; lots of ambiguous descriptions of the various kinds of blocks. Tip: refer to the plans which show pictures of the blocks and then get a Spanish-English dictionary. This will help distinguish between double and single and hearts and clump blocks. But all in all it is a good kit and you should have fun. Most of my problems initially had to do with a warped false keel and frames that did not want to line up fair. The single planking is challenging but doable. As a complete novice, if I can make it look good so can you. Finally, I hope you have a lot of display room. This model ends up taking lots of space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Welcome to the AL Bounty club....looks like you're off to a solid start.

 

So far I'm fairly happy with the instructions, just a few errors and omissions that will be obvious as you run into them :)   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like you have a good start, appears as though there will be lots of frames to glue to so hopefully one layer of planking will work

 

Yes Don, that one layer of planking is going to be a tester I think. It may well spoil an otherwise impessive (so far) build design. I wonder why they opted for that, something to do with the open side perhaps, although I can't really see it would take anything from it, it would add to it more like)!

 

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just discovered your this build log and will follow it closely. I've got a build log of this same Bounty kit going. I'm into it for the same reason you are -- a gift from someone. I too was impressed by the

plans, instructions and pictures....until they petered out just when you start needing explanations and close up pictures the most. I think AL is Spanish, not Italian but I may be wrong. The translations are not as good as you'd imagine; lots of ambiguous descriptions of the various kinds of blocks. Tip: refer to the plans which show pictures of the blocks and then get a Spanish-English dictionary. This will help distinguish between double and single and hearts and clump blocks. But all in all it is a good kit and you should have fun. Most of my problems initially had to do with a warped false keel and frames that did not want to line up fair. The single planking is challenging but doable. As a complete novice, if I can make it look good so can you. Finally, I hope you have a lot of display room. This model ends up taking lots of space.

 

Several good observations there Al. I'm certainly impressed up to now, and really enjoying myself with the build, but I'm well aware this is the easiest bit, both build and instructions thereof, but we'll see. My false keel isn't warped, I've gone so far as to dry test the first (lower) deck, and all the cutouts fit all the ribs pretty well considering how easy it would be not to. Thanks for the translation tips!

Edited by bryanc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a lot of work has been done; all the keel frames (ribs) have been fitted and the fore and aft lower deck pieces are complete. The deck beams for the next (proper) lower deck are fitted, including the one and only chock or deck support detailed in the plans. I have a micro lathe on order, and this original chock will be replaced by a "proper" turned one shortly. No doubt I'll get carried away and the fancy turned chocks will appear all over the place!

 

As I mentioned, I elected to paint and varnish the frames as opposed to staining them, a decision I don't regret, but it took some time. The decks were scored to simulate the planking, and I made slight indentations with a small drill bit to indicate the treenails. I then applied a light oak wood filler to the decks, finger rubbing it well in, then removing the majority with a damp rag, obviously this filled in the scored lines and "nail" holes. The result isn't perfect, but the appearence is quite good I think, without being overstated.

 

post-17543-0-49153000-1438961425_thumb.jpg

 

post-17543-0-10225900-1438961473_thumb.jpg

 

(Note "The Supply", my previous ship stood behind the Bounty. It gives a good idea of the scale, the Supply being 1:64, while the Bounty is 1:48 - even allowing for foreshortening, its quite a difference in size)!

 

As one part of the keel is going to be exposed, I've every intention of "bashing" additional cabins on these lower decks and others, otherwise any attempt at even vague authenticity is redundant. The only "construction" in this lower part of the kit, is the "well" around the mid mast (photo later). I've no idea what the function of this well is, although it is authentic, appearing in old drawings and plans of the ship - as do the cabins!

 

Bryan

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Nice work on the frames, looks very square and true.

 

What colour did you use to paint the frames?

 

As to your query on the well around the main mast it is described in McKay's book as the hold well and contains the lower section of the elm tree pumps. I think it was a room to separate the bilge from the main hold.

 

Hope this helps 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jeff,

 

To be honest the "straightness" of the frames is more a testament to the quality of the kit as much as it is to me. As I said previously, I've dry fitted the next deck(s) up, and they fit with very little "persuasion", which with a build of this size is quite remarkable.

 

The frames are painted with Admiralty Paints Wood (Walnut) Brown! As you may know the instructions suggested they be stained, but I found slight discolourations in the wood showed through, hence paint and satin varnish.

 

And thanks for the "hold well" info. I must get "The Anatomy" book.

 

Bryan

Edited by bryanc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Bashing" on...

 

There's not much evidence of all the considerable work which has been going on recently. I finished the lower decks and I added to the central "well" which is in the plans, with a lot of "cabins" which definitely aren't.  I came across some old drawings of the Bounty (I can't remember where, I apologise if it was from someone else's build log) which show how accurate the "well" is, and also shows an array of cabins on this deck and the one above.

 

One of the features of this particular kit is the "diorama", the fact that the majority of the keel on the port side is exposed, revealing the interior. There is little point in that if there isn't much detail there to see. Hence the cabins. I must admit much of the work will not actually be really visible once the decks are in place, but it will be more "complete".

 

post-17543-0-70083800-1439371484_thumb.jpg

 

post-17543-0-48860600-1439371502_thumb.jpg

 

Theoretically the deck above is now fitted (in two pieces) after the planking thereof, but I'm a bit concerned about the fitting of some of the lower stairwell furniture, so will have to investigate before continuing, as I fear it will be tricky to do with the deck in place.

 

Bryan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is all looking nice and neat Bryan, you have a valid point about the deck furniture probably a  good idea to check that out(good catch). The frames look good painted and with the wood not taking stain evenly you had no choice but to paint. Are they basswood frames, if they are I have never been able to get basswood to take a stain evenly either. I think it is just the nature of the wood and it just cries for paint. ;):)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Thanks for the info on the paint I think I will do the same when I get to it as it will hide the ply and laser cut marks.

 

Very nice work on the cabins and you are right there were cabins and storerooms on the decks fore and aft of the main hold and I think you will be surprised how much you will see when the deck is fitted :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lower Deck

 

The lower deck is now in place, and again it fitted with relative ease; no great "persuasion" needed, and bearing in mind the size of the thing and the fact the deck is in two halves (lengthwise), that is no mean feat - on the part of the kits quality, not my skill. However I've a horrible feeling the upper, top deck is not going to fit as well. The lower deck was then varnished, but with a new make of varnish, and it's not as good as the one used on the other bits of deck in the hold etc., it doesn't bring out the tone, detail and colour as much, dammit!

 

With the lower deck in place one thing became immediately obvious; the port side (the exposed side) bashed "cabins" in the holds beneath immediately became an impediment. There was nothing wrong with them, but they would have made the construction of the companionways near impossible and would anyway have obscured that and other detail. I should have realised this of course. Sadly they had to go.

 

The starboard side cabins remain intact, and look OK, though I may now add further detail to them.

 

post-17543-0-81345800-1439556674_thumb.jpg

 

There is now a lot of lower deck detail to add, and the companionways, but I'm already feeling frustrated as I will still be thwarted in producing ornamental chocks and companionway balusters, as I am still waiting for my lathe! It is was ordered nearly two weeks ago and is coming from Germany, obviously being transported by 17th century sailing ship, as it is not due for a further two weeks!

 

Bryan

Edited by bryanc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Thanks for the info on the paint I think I will do the same when I get to it as it will hide the ply and laser cut marks.

 

Very nice work on the cabins and you are right there were cabins and storerooms on the decks fore and aft of the main hold and I think you will be surprised how much you will see when the deck is fitted :o

 

Hi Jeff,

 

An update on the hold cabins / storerooms in my latest update! Regarding painting the ply and laser cut marks, I found it near impossible to paint the latter! Where the laser had actually cut the wood, the "blackened" burns will just not accept paint. As some will be visible, the frames (ribs) and elsewhere, I strongly suggest they be well sanded prior to painting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Looking good. Sorry to see you had to remove some of your cabins but it does make sense that they would have concealed some of the detail.

 

Thanks for the tip on the laser cut edges.

 

Hope your lathe turns up soon :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

 

I'm getting ready to glue up my main deck as well and thought I’d make a few comments.  Not sure if you’ve already considered these things but just to be on the safe side here’s a few things I learned.  

 

 

Regardless of the time I spent leveling and squaring the frames I’ll still need to shim one side and trim the other on several of my frames (will be done as I fair the frames for hull planking).  Most AL Bounty builds I’ve seen all had to do this after gluing down the main deck (Frames tend to shift during construction more than solid Bulkheads). 

 

 

As you test fit your main deck, be sure to check alignment on all the masts, and anything else that drops through the main deck into the lower sections of the ship (bilge pipes, support beams, etc).

 

 

Also, you’ll need to notch two cross beams (middle and upper deck supports) to get the bilge pipes through to the hold (I found it easier to do this prior to gluing down the middle and main decks – quite large notches need to be cut out).

 

 

I also spent some time deciding what details I would glue in prior to fairing and planking the hull…most I’ll glue in post planking to avoid dust and knocking things loose.  

 

 

Your build looks great so far and good luck  :)

 

 

 

Edited by thomaslambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lower Deck Complete – well nearly

 

post-17543-0-02353400-1440244020_thumb.jpg

 

The build continues, slowly, and some of my enthusiasm for the kit quality is taking a knocking and the truth of the comments by others (including Captain Al) regarding the quality, or not, of the instructions are really revealing themselves.

 

The instructions first; the real detailed instructions you require are definitely beginning to peter out just when you need them most, and some items do not warrant any instruction at all. The photographs themselves are suddenly getting very involved without any specific help directed to them. But one soldiers on, or sailors on!

 

The build quality is also beginning to cause concern. For instance the pre-cut out holes for the bilge pump tubes (completely over the top high quality brass) are directly above the deck support beams in both lower and upper decks. Or is that my fault I wonder? And that stove! What a struggle getting that thing constructed and again, not a word of instruction. Although in the case of the stove, maybe it was considered obvious what was required.

 

post-17543-0-69391400-1440244061_thumb.jpg

 

The quality of the items is still generally very good, sometimes too good i.e. the stove and the bilge pump piping. But sometimes it’s the lack of materials that is upsetting. I completely ran out of the 5 x 5 walnut pieces with which the deck beams / supports are constructed, and with several still to fabricate. Granted I did waste a little trying to produce artistic chocks, but hardly that much. I’ve used scrap wood as alternatives.

 

But I’m sounding disenchanted, and I’m not, I’m still thoroughly enjoying myself, it’s just that the problems are beginning to emerge a little too often.

 

I have blissfully continued to make embellishments as and when the mood takes me, and some more successful than others; I have added extra interior walls to suggest more cabins and storage space and even increased the number of breadfruit. In reality there was infinitely more space given over for the storage of these plants than the kit suggests and supplies. (On the original Bounty there was space given over for well over 1000 “pots” as near as I can estimate. The kit provides 36.) I have however added a further row of the plants to the existing plan. I have no more “pots”, and merely put the “plants” on a fabricated table at the rear of the existing ones. The lack of pots won’t be discernible when the upper deck is in position.

 

post-17543-0-67943500-1440244112_thumb.jpg

 

post-17543-0-37330800-1440244144_thumb.jpg

 

post-17543-0-41925400-1440244198_thumb.jpg

 

Further detail will be added later, as the kit will have to be upended for the planking sooner or later, and I don’t want to endanger any embellishments. I couldn’t however resist adding some leg irons to the wall of the tiny “brig” :-)

 

Of course there is one specific still absent; some of the companionways, and specifically the associated “furniture”; fancy turned balusters and the like. My mini lathe at long last arrived, but to my absolute horror there is quite a steep learning curve involved in mastering the thing. I’ve advanced as far as being able to produce a reasonable looking “turned” baluster, but I am completely foxed as to how to replicate identical ones! Is there any kind soul out there that has any “wood turning for dummies” suggestions?

 

Bryan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hi Bryan,

 

 

I'm getting ready to glue up my main deck as well and thought I’d make a few comments.  Not sure if you’ve already considered these things but just to be on the safe side here’s a few things I learned.  

 

 

Regardless of the time I spent leveling and squaring the frames I’ll still need to shim one side and trim the other on several of my frames (will be done as I fair the frames for hull planking).  Most AL Bounty builds I’ve seen all had to do this after gluing down the main deck (Frames tend to shift during construction more than solid Bulkheads). 

 

 

As you test fit your main deck, be sure to check alignment on all the masts, and anything else that drops through the main deck into the lower sections of the ship (bilge pipes, support beams, etc).

 

 

Also, you’ll need to notch two cross beams (middle and upper deck supports) to get the bilge pipes through to the hold (I found it easier to do this prior to gluing down the middle and main decks – quite large notches need to be cut out).

 

 

I also spent some time deciding what details I would glue in prior to fairing and planking the hull…most I’ll glue in post planking to avoid dust and knocking things loose.  

 

 

Your build looks great so far and good luck  :)

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for that Thomas. And really good tips! The alignment of the masts I have kept an eye on, and all is well. The bilge pipes less so (see my last post). I will do as you say on the main or upper deck cross beams, but its too late for the lower ones. Some dexterous drilling is called for I think. Deciding what detail to add prior to hull planking and what not to is really taxing, but basically I think I've added all I intend to for now.

 

Thaks again,

 

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan,

 

Your internals look great, I think the stove and the plants turned out really well.

 

Sorry I can't help you out with your turning as I'm still experimenting with mine but there are some good tutorials on you tube :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian,

 

Yes, the bilge pipes aren't addressed until step 40 (way to late IMO) and it says the cross beams "may" need to be cut out...no "may" about it  :)

 

You mentioned you ran out of 5mm x 5mm cross beam material (in every case so far I've had plenty of material...actually extra).  

 

What comes to mind is a question; I can't tell by looking at your picture, but the kit supplies laser cut cross beams for the top deck support as they are arched to put a curve in the top deck for water run off (like the real ships).  Just wanted to make sure you used those curved beams as opposed to cutting your own? 

Edited by thomaslambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Boyd/Brian, I just wanted to comment that I also neglected to notch those beams down below for the pipes but in a way I'm glad I did. It could be tricky locating the exact spot to put the notches before running the pipes down through the top deck and seeing where they are going to hit the beams. I used a long round file to cut out the notches. Painstaking but effective.

 

Also, there is a lot of good African walnut left on the templates after removing cut out pieces. You can easily find pieces that can be used in place of 5x5 material in a pinch -- with a bit of sanding of course.

 

Which brings to mind something I may have noted long ago. If you haven't already planked, the all time best tool I've bought for this work is a little thumb plane made by Buck and sold in Home Depot for $8. For tapering the edge of a plank, nothing worked better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Captain Al and Thomaslambo, just an update really; I have now notched the upper deck beams (but the work will have to be undone now - see below), and am in the process of notching the lower deck beams with a round needle file, laborious, but safer than attempting to take a drill to it! 

 

But (Thomas), I had completely missed the the fact that the upper deck supports are made from supplied curved beams! What a costly mistake! Its hardly any wonder I ran out of 5 x 5 material. But now I've got the difficult task of removing the existing beams and replacing them with the supplied ones.The dangers of making assumptions! Groan. Thanks Thomas.

 

And Al, thanks for the tip re. the thumb plane. I've checked, they are available over here (the UK) as well.

 

Thanks guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

The reason I noticed it was because I came very close to making the same mistake.  The good news is you didn't glue down the main deck  :)

 

A sharp razor saw should do the trick if you didn't use PVA (which should come loose with a bit of Isopropyl Alcohol on the joints).

 

 

Hey, on another subject, what material/product did you use for your plants....I really like the crisp green color? :)

 

Cheers   

Edited by thomaslambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about those beams Bryan but glad you could find the thumb plane. I'll take it step further and note how I actually did it. I had 1.5 x 5 mm walnut strips to work with -- as I assume you do as well. After doing a bit of math and measureing to determine how much to taper (I tried to keep the taper to 2.5mm or less but failed in that a lot and had to taper much more), I used a metal ruler to draw the line from one end of the strip to the other. Note that after the first six planks of basswood which I did with full 630mm planks, I started cutting my planks or strakes into thirds (mostly). So sometimes, depending on where the taper would begin, the line of taper on a plank would not necessarily be from a full 5mm down to say 3mm. The start of the plank would of course have to match the end of the previously laid plank so the taper line might go from say 4mm down to 3. Working with the smaller planks made many things easier. I doubt I could have done much with longer ones. Anyway, once the line was drawn I clamped the plank in between two wooden rulers (available btw for free at Home Depot as yard sticks and which make excellent wood for lots of things), with the scribe line parallel to the rulers. The rulers are of course to stiffen the plank as you plane it. Then I clamped the whole thing into a vise and started planing. I got where I could taper a plank nicely in 10 minutes including all steps. Compared to half hour when I was trying to cut the taper with an Exacto blade held stiff up against the metal ruler. '

 

Practice doing drop planks on the ends of scrap planks. Its fun after you get the hang of it and you'll need them. I used both a saw and snips to get my angles cut but the saw made more accurate cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bryan.

Just catching up on your build..

Wow a fast mover.. You have done soooo much. And very nicely too.

All the extra bits you are adding are looking real good and will make the finished model a real masterpiece.

 

Regards Antony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys, lots of helpful comments, so I'll mention them all in the one minor update.

 

Thomas; many thanks for pointing out my error with the upper deck support beams, and yes, thank god I hadn't added the main deck before the error was realised! I've now replaced the beams with the correct kit provided ones. Its a little bit worrying that they didn't fit as well as the handmade ones (either too big or too short), but that’s understandable I suppose. I'm just hoping the upper deck now fits OK, but I'm a little apprehensive. At least when the beams were removed I was able to take advantage of the opportunity and get at those bilge pipe holes more easily. I think the pipes will be OK now, although I've still to notch the upper beams themselves.

 

It’s a testament to how good basic white wood glue is, oh I did have a job removing them, and yes Thomas, it was down to patient "sawing" with a scalpel that helped most. Mind you when lifting the beam affixed to the "bashed" wall against which the stove and chest were placed, the whole lot came out in one piece, wall, stove, chest the lot! They remained intact and went back together as one piece!

 

post-17543-0-01128100-1440413869_thumb.jpg

 

The plant material was from a UK company; http://www.serious-play.co.uk/, and is material intended for model railway enthusiasts scenic creations. They have some excellent and sometimes quiet bizarre items, and I also have additionally acquired some "mixed stone" for down in the bilges as ballast and even some "coal" to go in the chest next to the stove!  The plant material I think was intended for railway cutting bushes and the like, but gently separating bits and gluing them in place proved quite effective. In fact I've oodles of the plant material left, I've only used a tiny amount from the one container and I've two of them! I can hardly imagine I'll ever have need for any more of it, and if it would be cost effective to send some over the pond to you, I happily would. I seriously doubt it would be though.

 

Thanks for the compliment Anthony, I do wonder if I do work too fast, as shown by the mistake made recently, I obviously do. And pay the price!

 

Al, that’s a clever way of preparing and working planking, and one I'll look towards when the more serious hull planking commences - something I'm not relishing, and never do. There is nowhere in this country going to give me wooden rulers for free however! But I'll cost them, because I can see the principal being applied to many things. But the planking; very clever. I've previously relied on the trusty scalpel and steel rule, but that’s not always as precise or effective.

 

So thanks guys. I've now got to persevere with the lathe and get all the balusters etc done, before I can move upward and assemble and mount the upper deck! YouTube now I think to look up wood turning by lathe for dummies....

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

My pleasure to help...and it looks like you've recovered nicely  :)

 

This may be overkill, but I put dowels through the beams into the frames at a slight angle.  After I glued the beams down, with a steady hand and dremel/drill I was able to drill the holes very quickly then glue and push the dowels in.  I don't want anything coming loose years down the road.   Yes, some of the beams were a bit short (used a small shim to tighten).

 

You can see pictures of the dowel install in my build log if you like. 

 

Thanks for the info on the plants  :)

Edited by thomaslambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...