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WASHINGTON GALLEY by yamsterman - 1/48 SCALE P.0.F


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HI ALL

I THOUGHT ID LAUNCH A NEW TOPIC TO RUN IN PARALELL WITH CHUCKS CUTTER CHEERFUL.

PLANS HAVE BEEN PURCHASED AND STUDIED FROM THE NRG.

PRACTICUM HAS BEEN DOWNLOADED.....I HAD THIS SPIRAL BOUND AT A LOCAL PRINT SHOP JUST TO KEEP EVERYTHING TOGETHER.

BOXWOOD HAS BEEN ORDERED AND DELIVERED....IN 2 DAYS!!!!!

 

I WAS ORIGINALLY GOING TO ORDER THE PRECUT PACKAGE FROM CROWN TIMBER.......HOWEVER WHILST I DO NOT DOUBT THE QUALITY OF JASONS PRODUCTS THE COST OF DELIVERY PLUS 20% VAT AND POST OFFICE HANDLING FEES WOULD HAVE PUSHED THE PRICE TO CLOSE ON £400.

 

I USUALLY USE A COUPLE OF COMPANYS FOR TIMBER ONE BEING ARKOWOOD AND THE OTHER BEING TIMBERLINE IN KENT ,UK.

I PHONED TIMBERLINE AND SPOKE TO BOB GIVING HIM A LIST OF REQUIREMENTS ( SCANTLING LIST IN BACK OF PRACTICUM) ALL IN IMPERIAL DIMENSIONS. THAT WAS YESTERDAY MORNING.

AT LUNCHTIME TODAY TNT TURNED UP WITH A NICE BIG PARCEL. ALL BOXWOOD TIMBER PROCESSED TO THE RELAVANT THICKNESSES IE THE CLOSEST METRIC EQUIVALENT.

 

THE 1/4 INCH THICK WORKS OUT AT 6.35MM.......AND IT IS!!

THE SAME APPLIES TO ALL OTHER THICKNESSES.

HOWS THAT FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE?

 

I CAN HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BOB AND HIS TEAM HAVING DEALT WITH THEM FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW.

THE ONLY THING WORTH MENTIONING IS THAT YOU WILL HAVE TO PLANE A STRAIGHT EDGE ON SOME OF THE TIMBER SHEETS.....HOW HARD IS THAT FOR A MODELMAKER?....AS THE SHEETS ARE CUT FROM A FAIRLY ROUGH SAWN BILLET.

 

 

I DIDNT ORDER ANY 1/16 AS IALREADY HAD SOME ON STOCK. THE 1/32 IS MAINLY FOR DECK PLANKING FOR WHICH I INTEND TO USE SOME ENGLISH HOLLY.

 

AND THE PRICE FOR ALL THAT LOVELY BOXWOOD (IN 1METRE LENGTHS) ?

 

INCLUDING VAT AND DELIVERY IT CAME TOO £164  A SIGNIFICANT SAVING FOR ME.

 

BUILDING BOARD HAS BEEN PREPARED SO I GUESS WERE READY TO START.

 

BUT FIRST FOUR NIGHT SHIFTS HAVE TO BE GOT OUT OF THE WAY!

 

CHEERS............MICK

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Hi all

I forgot to mention it in the opening post.

Regarding the keel scarfs....the plans and practicum show the scarf in the horizontal plane , I was under the impression,especially after looking through Goodwin,that 18c scarfs were cut in the vertical plane? Is this a peculiarity of colonial shipwrights? I'd hate to make a boo boo during the first piece of timber!

Also are there any written references/text books concerning the building of colonial naval ships at or about this time,1776?

Any help greatly appreciated!

Cheers....mick

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Mick:

Glad you are starting this build log.

 

Jeff worked from plans from the National Maritime Museum plans taken off the ship after it was captured so the scarfs are probably correct.  The Bibliography lists a good number of references Jeff used.

 

Looking forward to watching your progress.

 

Kurt

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I would absolutely change the direction of the scarf joints to what is more commonly acceptable. I looked over the plans very carefully before publishing as did others, and had made several recommendations for changes. This was actually one I had overlooked. :rolleyes:    

I will certainly make this a new recommendation to Jeff  to possibly change it in the guide and plans for future printings. Nice catch.  But I will talk to him and see where he is on the subject.  But in my opinion,  yes the scarfs should go in the other plain as is commonly seen.

Cheers,
Chuck

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Hi Christian

It is somewhat different. I decided to have a go as it looks like an ideal subject for a first attempt at a full pof hull.....not too many awkward half and can't frames and some interesting stern framing.....also only one main deck and fairly simple rigging. Should be a nice contrast to the previously built sloop from 1776.

Let's hope I can do it justice.

Cheers.....mick

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Hi Carl

Only a quick hop across the channel for you.....nice couple of days in dear old blighty...maybe a trip to Chatham for theropery and model ship collectionand then on to timberline to pick up all that lovely hardwood.....just a thought!

Cheers.....mick

Edited by yamsterman
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Hi all

I forgot to mention it in the opening post.

Regarding the keel scarfs....the plans and practicum show the scarf in the horizontal plane , I was under the impression,especially after looking through Goodwin,that 18c scarfs were cut in the vertical plane? Is this a peculiarity of colonial shipwrights? I'd hate to make a boo boo during the first piece of timber!

Also are there any written references/text books concerning the building of colonial naval ships at or about this time,1776?

Any help greatly appreciated!

Cheers....mick

Mick/Chuck,

 

    Could you explain this a little further?  Pictures perhaps?  I am still several weeks away from starting the project...still working on the build board...but since the keel is one of the first items to be completed, I wanted to ensure I was clear on the correct process.

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Jeff is working on updating the plans and monograph.  As soon as its complete I will post an an update along with the adjusted plans on the website.  There really isnt much to say about it.  The scarfs just need to be turned so they are now fully visible on the top and bottom of the keel rather than the sides.  Stay tuned for the actual update.

 

Chuck

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WASHINGTON GALLEY PART 1

 

HI ALL

 

WOOD HAS FINALLY BEEN CUT.

STARTED WITH BASIC KEEL COMPONENTS.

MAIN KEEL CUT 3/16 WIDE BY 7/32 DEEP.  FALSE KEEL 3/16  X  1/16.  HOG 3/16  BY 3/32.

ALL CUT FROM SHEET MATERIAL ON THE BYRNES SAW.

 

I DECIDED TO DO THIS IN THREE SEPERATE PIECES AS IT WOULD BE EASIER TO PROFILE THE REBATE.

 

THE HOG(?) HAS PROVED TO BE QUITE A TASKING PIECE TO MAKE ACCURATELY. THE PIECES IN THE PHOTOS ARE THE FOURTH ATTEMPT!!!!

 

I ORIGINALLY ASSUMED THAT THE SPACE BETWEEN THE DOUBLE FRAMES,WHICH ARE 1FT THICK(SIDED) OR 1/4 INCH ON THE MODEL WOULD BE EQUAL TO 0NE FRAME THICKNESS OR 6INCHES IN REAL LIFE (1/8inch) ON THE MODEL.A QUICK MEASUREMENT LATE A NIGHT SEEMED TO CONFIRM THIS.

 

 

WRONG!WRONG!WRONG!............MEASURE TWICE OR EVEN THRICE.......CUT ONCE!

 

THE ACTUAL MEASUEMENT IS 9/16 ON AN INCH.

 

IN ORDER TO CUT THIS ACCURATELY I HAD TO DEVISE A JIG FOR THE MILLING MACHINE

( SEE PHOTOS)

 

 

BUILDING BOARD AND FRAME PLAN PREPARED AND ALMOST READY FOR USE.

 

A FEW JIGS HAVE ALSO BEEN MADE FOR HELP IN FRAME ALIGNMENT....BUT THESE MAY HAVE TO BE REDONE AS THEY MAY BE ON THE CLUNKY SIDE.

 

THATS ABOUT ALL FOR THE MOMENT.....BACK TO WORK WE GO

 

CHEERS....MICK

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That's a clever jig for scoring the rising wood to accept the frames. Part of the fun of using a mill is figuring out the setups. I would make sure the pattern is marked out on top of the rising wood and checked every few passes. Even with the spacer, cumulative error can creep in and the last few mortices could be off by an inch or so.

 

For those without a mill, you can accomplish the same result using a table saw with a .052 or larger blade set to the correct height. The pattern is affixed to the side of the rising wood with rubber cement (or your preference) and successive cuts made. Note - in the photo the sides are also scored.

 

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