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hi alde

thanks for the nice comments. I make more mistakes than I care to admit!!

small steps and youll soon be trying your hand at a fully framed hull......Washington is my first fully framed hull.....I chose it because it was relatively straightforward.....only one main deck...no shifted or cast frames...minimal number of gunports etc etc.

 

I have long been an admirer of the likes of Harold underhill.....Harold Hahn....napean longridge  to name just three.

I looked at their work and thought I could never do anything like that despite having built numerous ship model kits.

and then I found model ship world......the world of ship modelmaking is now your oyster!!!

 

whatever project you decide to do there will be plenty of support not to mention the incomparable amount of knowledge that's available......plus photos!!!!

a picture can be worth a thousand words especially when trying to explain something complex.

 

having completed the triton cross section I can highly recommend it as a starting point for framed construction.

 

I shall at some point start on the echo cross section as its a next step in frame construction......and hms echo in full hull form is very high on my list of priorities.

 

look forward to seeing your triton build log.....shall follow avidly!!

 

cheers....mick

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Mick,

 

One thing that I love about this forum is the support offered and the fact that nobody is judgmental and when mistakes are pointed out it is done in a very constructive way. My experience is that it is like that to a person, from the new modelers to the most experienced artists. I have never been given so may words of encouragement and assistance as I have on this forum. People take time away from the little time they have to pursue the hobby to help others. That really is a special thing that this forum offers. It's very much appreciated.

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Mick,

 

As I am cutting out the frame parts for my Triton cross section I am looking over your Washington Galley build again. Maybe I missed it due to lake of sleep but I am wondering what your primary tool is for shaping and sanding the frames after they are cut out. Do you use a spindle sander for the inside curves?

 

I have 3 sets of frame parts left to cut out and then I will start putting them together. I do wish I left more wood on the outside of the lines for fairing like you did but will live with what I have unless it becomes a problem.

 

Thanks for any information.

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I agree with what you said about MSW, I thought building out of the box was plenty. Then I got a telescope and saw the DARK SIDE. Now I'll never be the same. My first try at POF is the Triton cross section. Then who knows? Mike

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hi al

all frame components for Washington and triton were cut out by hand with a jewellers saw with the appropriate blade.

unfortunately I don't have space in my workshop for a scroll saw as I work in a small spare room in the house.

I could put one in the garage but its too cold to work in there!!!

 

once the frames are cut out I use a proxxon sanding machine to establish the flat edges for the butt joins between frame components and also for sanding as much as the outside of the frame as possible.

 

I then resort to a dremel which is mounted in the dremel shaper table and fitted with a small sanding drum. I use this for all the inside curves and any bits on the outside that couldn't be dealt with on the proxxon.......sort of miniature spindle sander I suppose!

 

I tend to sand just to the outside of the line...all lines have a "thickness" so its my way of leaving a bit of meat on the bones for nibbling away at later!

 

hope this helps.

 

cheers.......mick

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hi all

just a quick update.

 

keelson has now been fitted

 

bolts for the scarf joints are 0.4mm copper........Goodwin says 1"-1/2" for these bolts so I spilt the difference and went for 3/4" more or less.

 

bolts for the keelson into the frames are 0.8mm copper at every other frame station again as per Goodwin ...approx. 1 1/2" full size.

 

quarter deck clamps are being glued in.....all treenails fitted prior to glueing.

 

cheers for now.......mick

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Mick:

Very nice work and good progress.  I truly enjoy your posts on this build.  Every time I send a set of these plans out I hope to see another build log pop up here on MSW.  Your posts will certainly help to answer any questions that might come up in alter builds.  I have told several purchasers about your build log but with the various aliases used I have no way of knowing if they are looking in or not - their loss if not.

Take care,

Kurt

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Kurt, It was Micks log that inspired me to order the Washington Galley plan set and also start a Triton Cross Section build. He is a true credit to the hobby.

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hi al

please I'm blushing!

if it wasn't for kurt and all the other staff at the nrg I wouldn't be building the Washington galley......and also thanks to jeff for drawing the plans in the first place.

hopefully I can do the plans justice.

thanks for all the likes and positive comments.

back to work for me........I shall return shortly.

 

cheers....mick

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Mick, A question. Do the historical building references tell us why they only bolted every other frame to the keel? Are the bolts only to hold the keelson down while it holds the frames to the keel? Not that it matters. I just would have thought they would want to add as much strength to the structure as possible.

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hi al

i was looking through goodwins construction and fitting.......apparentley they bolted every frame after 1800. prior to that it was every other frame....with two bolts per frame.

i tend to use goodwin as my construction bible.

if anybody knows if they did it differently please let me know.

as to why they did it i dont know...theres no explanation given as such.

 

cheers.....mick

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hi mike

plenty of sanding! not sure how thick the toptimbers should be on this one....will probably go with the dimensions goodwin gives for cutters/sloops.

outside of the frames have to be faired yet but fortunately amidships is pretty uniform with no excessive tumble home or curves to worry about.

things might get a bit funky at the bow and stern!

cheers....mick

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Mick, I have Goodwins Construction and Fitting book. I guess I better get to reading. So much to learn but that is one of the things I love about this hobby.

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HI ALL

 

SOME MORE COMPONENTS HAVE BEEN MADE.

 

I STARTED WITH THE FORE , AFT AND CAPSTAN STEPS........THESE WERE MADE FROM EUROPEAN BOX BY WAY OF A SMALL CONTRAST TO THE PRIMARY TIMBER OF CASTELLO BOX.

 

PRETTY STRAIGHTFORWARD TO MAKE....THE DADO FOR THE KEELSON WAS CUT ON THE BYRNES SAW.

 

LIMBER STRAKES ARE UNDER MANUFACTURE...CUT FROM CASTELLO SHEET TO 1/16" THICK BY 3/16" WIDE.

 

THE INNER EDGE OF THIS RECIEVES A RABBET FOR THE LIMBER BOARDS 1/32" BY 1/32".

 

I WASNT TOO HAPPY ABOUT CUTTING THIS ON THE SAW SO I USED THE PROXXON MILL.

THE PHOTOS SHOULD BE SELF EXPLANATORY, I HOPE, BUT IF NOT FEEL FREE TO ASK.

 

THERE ARE THREE STRAKES PER SIDE....THE CENTRAL STRAKE BEING STRAIGHT WITH A SCARF AT EITHER END.

THE FORE AND AFT STRAKES HAVE TOO BE CURVED TO MEET WITH THE KEELSON. I HAVE DECIDED TO TRY CHUCKS EDGE BENDING METHOD WITH THESE AND SO FAR ITS WORKING PRETTY WELL.

 

MAIN DECK CLAMPS HAVE BEEN CUT 3/16" BY 3/32"...I THINK THERES A LITTLE MORE FAIRING REQ BEFORE THESE GO IN.

 

PHOTOS ENCLOSED FOR YOUR DELICTATION!

 

CHEERS....MICK

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That's a very clever way of cutting the rabbit on the long stock. As simple as it is I would never have thought of it.

 

Do you run the mill at very high speed when working with wood? I was very pleased with how clean the rabbit was for my Triton Cross Section using the mill. I just ran it as fast as it would go.

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hi al

the proxxon is variable speed from 5000-20000rpm......I didn't look at the speed setting! it was probably on its lowest setting of 5k.

the milling cutter is 2mm diameter......one of those used in the electronics industry as sold on amazon.........box of eight I think for about £10.

they are pretty good for our purposes and give a nice clean cut.

 

the jig was pretty simple to make....max 10 minutes work.....then let the glue dry!

 

the important thing is its very controllable and it keeps my fingers away from rapidly spinning hss.

 

the timber was cut on the byrnes saw and I did think about cutting the rabbet on the same.....but came to the conclusion the mill was safer.

 

shall be fitting the limber strakes today and drilling lots of holes for treenails!

 

cheers....mick

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Wow,eye candy for the ship model builder and a level of craftsmanship  that few attain. I can do this same level of work,but only in my dreams. I sometimes hate it when I wake up and realize that it was only a dream.

 

It's like when I would see my dog Vincent sleeping and dreaming while he was laying on his side and his legs were moving like he was running after a chipmunk,And then when he would wake up,his look on his face was ,crap I did not catch that damn chipmunk,it was only in my dream! Still hoping someday that it will not be only a dream.    

 

Great work Mick.

 

Keith

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hi keith

thanks for stopping by and the compliments....much appreciated.

we used to have a Labrador that was an inveterate twitcher when snoring his head off.

must have been dreaming of chasing rabbits or cats......no chipmunks in dear old blighty!

 

my skills , such as they are , have developed over thirty five years of modelmaking of one sort or another.

like many I started with airfix kits then the new wave of Japanese kits , Tamiya etc........I was also an avid meccano and lego buff as a kid.

I have always made things.....its what I do!

 

keep those tools razor sharp and plenty of practice.....if at first its not right do it again...and again....and again......and soon the dream will become reality!

 

cheers....mick

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