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Hi all-

I am currently building the AL Mayflower kit.  It comes with two of those silk, sticky-back flags.  My question is, how do you make those flags look realistic?  In the past when I have done flags of this nature, they end up looking really unrealistic because they just sit there flat in the direction of the wind.  How do you make them "hang" like a real flag would look?  

Thanks!

Stu

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premade flags are the great shame of the whole hobby in my opinion. You are better off sourcing a flag elsewhere or making your own. Its sad how often I see well made decent models brought low by crappy flags and ensigns. Another great sin is when its clear someone grabbed ANY small flag they could find, regardless of its scale appropriateness, and stuck it on the model. Often these flags look like they were paper flags intended to decorate cupcakes or Barbie Doll houses.

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Good question, Stu. Gus Agustin of Chicago has made terrific flags. He has written about them in various ship model magazines and journals. His method is too long to describe here in detail, but basically he uses thin paper that is dampened and teased into shape after painting. Perhaps you can locate one of his articles.

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Good question, Stu. Gus Agustin of Chicago has made terrific flags. He has written about them in various ship model magazines and journals. His method is too long to describe here in detail, but basically he uses thin paper that is dampened and teased into shape after painting. Perhaps you can locate one of his articles.

Thanks Druxey, I will look for him.  

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The best flag I ever saw was at the NRG conference about ten years ago, in Portland.  I mention that so somebody might remember the name of the manufacturer.  It was made from a solid sheet of something, shaped and hand painted.  It was of the complexity of a British Royal Standard and beautifully done.

 

post-17589-0-53256100-1443039158.gif

Edited by jbshan

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One method which I quite like - and will most likely attempt in the future - is to coat your cloth flag in a diluted PVA mix, and then attach it to a piece cut from an aluminium drink can. Crumple the aluminium piece to get the desired shape and then let it dry.

 

Once it has dried, carefully peel the flag away from the aluminium. Hopefully, you'll be left with a perfectly-formed wind-blown flag, replete with ripples.

Edited by CaptainSteve

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Joel: chances are that the work you saw at the NRG Conference in Portland was Gus Agustin's!

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Joel: chances are that the work you saw at the NRG Conference in Portland was Gus Agustin's!

It could be, druxey.  As I recall it was about 2 1/2 inches square, more perhaps for military miniatures as it was fairly heavy, at least it looked heavy.  I believe it was a semi-commercial offering, as Lloyd Warner's blocks are semi-commercial.

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To make a flag hanging limp, as if there is no breeze, I first glued the flag to it's halyard with CA.  I then "rolled" the flag around a pencil on the diagonal.  A couple of drops of CA on the inside surfaces hold the "roll" in place.  I then gave the flag a couple of coats of Testor's Dull-Cote flat clear lacquer and it was done.  Here's a photo.

post-3900-0-41629800-1443272069_thumb.jpg

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There is also a discussion thread on how to make your own flags by printing on transfer material and ironing onto cloth. 

 

That discussion is here.  I know this worked well for me. I used the lightest cloth (Lawn Cotton) I could find and the foil method for drying it in shape.

Edited by robnbill

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