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Turning a Lathe into a table saw


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I recently got a small (Taig) lathe, so I built a base for it and the motor, along with some drawers for keeping the accessories out of the dust.  I also wanted a small table saw, but with the lathe I already had a powered shaft, so why not mount a circular saw on it and then a table.  For simplicity, the table height adjustment uses the same tilting concept as used for thickness sanders.

 

This is where I started and the attached pdf describes the design and how I turned a lathe into a table saw (pun intended).  When time permits, I intend to also build a thickness sander based on the same concept.

 

 

Bruce

 

 

 

 

 

 

TableSaw.pdf

post-17154-0-33984600-1442789346_thumb.jpg

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Great job, Bruce. 
I have an old Shopsmith that I used as a table saw for many years. Then I added a table on top of the 'table' (pun intended), and mounted a four inch blade, etc, etc. 

It works for me.

I also like your usage of the malimine (sp?) board. I have it on my workbench and several other places where I need a smooth, flat surface.

 

What is involved in changing from the lathe back to the saw and visa versa?

Edited by Modeler12
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Jay

To remove the table, loosen the two knobs that lock the module to the rear T- track; pivot the table up so it clears the saw, the slide the module to the right. Then, remove the arbour. Everything off in less than a minute. Putting back on is just the reverse. No adjustments needed.

 

Bruce

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Indeed many bench lathes, including those for modellers, such as the Unimat, had saw-tables as an option. For added precision the saw-arbors we countersunk at the end, so that they could be supported by the tailstock.

 

However, when sawing a lot of wood, I would be cautious with all the sawdust around that it doesn't get into the spindle bearings. Also sawdust and oil makes mixtures that stick to leadscrews and can lead to excessive wear, particular when metal chips are mixed in as well.

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