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Has anyone found a source for blackened or iron-looking eye bolts for rigging cannon?  I am not sure I want to purchase the materials used to blacken items.

 

I have tried to paint the brass-looking ones that came with my kit.  The larger eye bolts seem to have turned out okay, but the really small ones are a pain.

 

I would love to find another color, other than the shiney brass ones.

 

Thanks,

 

Jeff

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You could try making your own out of blackened wire.  You should be able to get blackened wire from jewelry supply store, but if you use the easy to use copper, you'll probably have to do touch-up paint after, as it's fairly easy to scratch the blackened color off while working with it.

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They're not a hard as they look, just get a good pair of really small needle nose pliers.

 

I have to admit though, I hate blackening metal, its my least favorite part of ship modeling.

 

BTW craft shops sell black wire in their jewelry section that works well for fabricating your own hooks.

 

Ken

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Thanks!!!  :)  To my knowledge nobody sells blackened eyebolts commercially.  I wish I could make them from the acrylic I make my hooks out of,  but the acrylic doesnt like any type of glue and it simply wouldnt work.  Best to just use 28 gauge black annealed wire to make your own eye bolts from scratch.  

 

Chuck

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Well, I have tried multiple ways now.  I took the eyelets from the kit, roughed them up, primed and then painted black.  A real pain in the butt.  First, I punched small holes is a block of Styrofoam, and painted them with a brush.  They end up spinning around, falling out and the holes get too big.  I then drilled about 60 very small holes in a small piece of wood and dropped them in.  It worked okay for the larger eyelets, but when I got to the smaller ones, they went down too far in the wood.

 

My next try was using my hemostats to hold the end opposite of the eye and to dip them in the primer first, poke out the excess primer from the eye and then to blow on them to dry them some before setting them down to do the next one.  After finishing about 100 of these, I switched over to dipping them in flat black acrylic and going through the same steps to let them dry.  These turned out pretty well.

 

I ordered a bottle of the Jax Black and have now tried to brush it on and then tried to let one soak for about 5-10 minutes or so.  Neither one worked as the black coating rubbed right off when I picked up the eyebolt.  Not sure this will work for me.

 

Jeff

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Jeff, sounds like you are using your JAX Black on uncleaned surfaces. The instructions say to brush on or immerse clean metal ...... What you think is clean, probably is not clean enough. Metal is fussy when it comes to plating or etching, do some research, probably some cleaning suggestions on the bottle of JAX Black.

jud

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Blackening brass is not that difficult and I would suggest to do that rather than paining, etc.

For a few bucks you can buy patina from a hobby supply store that handles stained-glass items.

It even comes in different colors besides black and it works on iron, copper, and other metals such as the casting stuff (brittany??)

 

For blackening brass wire I would highly recommend that you remove the clear coating that is applied to wire to keep it shiny. Some steel wool will do it. I always do this on a large section of the spool. 

This also helps if you do any soldering, brazing or bonding with epoxy or CA.

Edited by Modeler12
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I scrubbed the brass eyelet with a wire brush, soaked it in vinegar for about 15 minutes, rinsed it in clear water, allowed it to dry and then let it soak in Jax black for about 20 minutes. When I pulled my hemostats out of the liquid, the jaws of the hemostat look great in black. I did not clean them or soak them. The brass eyelet is as brass looking as it ever was. I am ready to give up on this product.

Jeff

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Strange.  I find that the Jax Pewter Black works fantastic on copper, brass, and the cast 'white' metal from the kits.  It does like to be brushed on though, and I use the Jax cleaner (also brushed).  It can be brushed while immersed in the product, or just using a small brush separate, but just immersing it doesn't leave a very even finish, while brushing it on seems to work great.

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I believe brushing on works better than immersion because brushing limits the amount of reaction and thickness of black. with immersion, too much black can build up and it loses and adhesion to the surface.

 

Just a thought though based upon my own experience blackening

 

Ken

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