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Hey everyone,

 

I just got to the rigging on my first ship model, the MS Phantom, and had a question about the rigging. Is the rigging shown on the plans the complete rigging, or is it missing some of the rigging for the sails. I would like to, if possible display her with sails but am unsure on whether or not it makes sense with the rigging plan supplied with the kit. Also, I would appreciate any input on what state the rigging would look good in, i.e. full sail, half sail, furled sails etc. Thanks in advance for any and all input you guys are willing to share with a young deck hand.

 

On a side note, if it is recommended to display with unfurled sails, I plan to use a method I found a while back that uses dyed thread pulled through to the undyed cloth to simulate the stitching in a closer to scale way. Preliminary tests have shown promise but canbea quite frustrating process because if a thread breaks, that could be all she wrote for that sail.

 

 

Thanks again,

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I too have just begun the rigging process on my Bounty.  It appears that there are two "rigging systems" on these ships.  The "standing rigging" which I believe is to give structural integrity to the masts and yards and the "running rigging" which was used to control the sails.  Some of the books and articles I have read state that if a ship was going to be in port for any length of time, the sails were taken down and the running rigging stowed.  This was to prevent rotting, etc.

 

I am thinking you could display with just standing rigging, standing and running with or without furled sails, all rigging with full sails or partial sales

As to difficulty, it looks like the least amount of work is standing, then standing and running, then adding sails, whether furled or not.

 

I have made no decision yet.  Figured I start with standing rigging and work my way up, stopping when the work exceed my skill level or I go crazy.

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Thanks for the response Don, I think that the rigging plan includes both standing rigging and running rigging since the kit came with both black (standing) and tan (running) line. I just wasn't sure if the running roofing that is included in the rigging plan includes the rigging for the sails or just for moving the yards and whatnot around. I'm not sure if there is separate running rigging for yards and sails, but if the sails are attached to the yards, it would stand to reason that they are one in the same. Like I said, just new top this and don't yet know the basics of rigging. I also need to sit down and closely examine the rigging plan some more and try to figure out the purpose of each line, I think that will clear some things up.

 

Good luck on rigging your Bounty, she is looking great so far!

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I was recently referred to a book on Amazon titled "Rigging Period Ship Models".  I purchased it.  While it is a description of a "typical" ship of the period it has been an enormous eye opener for me.  You might want to take a look at it.

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Schooner running rigging is pretty simple. The easiest to spot are the Sheets, which are what allow the crew to adjust the sails while they are set and drawing. There are a pair of sheets on each of the headsails, one for Port and one for Starboard tacks. The big lower sails will have a fairly heavy block and tackle for their sheets, attached under the Fore and Main booms and led to the centerline of the ship more or less directly under where they are attached to the booms.

There are some other lines like Quarter Lifts and Downhauls. There would likely also be many other lines like Preventers and Jig Tackles but the Sheets are the more important ones.

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