Jump to content
marktiedens

Royal William by marktiedens - FINISHED - Euromodel - scale 1:72

Recommended Posts

Thanks,Michael - yes,I am using Chuck`s rope for all but the smallest lines. I am using sewing thread for those. Nothing really wrong with the kit rope - just too fuzzy like all kit rope. All the kit rope is light tan & I was having trouble darkening it consistently & once I did,it got too stiff to work with. I already had most of what I needed anyway.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to fix an error - the cleats on the fore & main masts for the preventer stays should have been just one on the forward surface of the mast instead of two on the sides,so I removed the ones on the sides & added the ones on the forward sides of the masts.

 

001.JPG.f772c424ce3b1a9196fb59401f460c9f.JPG

 

003.JPG.357c2d16b918c7863145ee843ee8bd3c.JPG

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

 

You HAVE been busy. The build is 'like whow' and now a mass of intricacies that we all dream of in a ship. Well done. I like your sprit topmast backstay rigging (with the ten blocks) where it was so important to have less tension in that than the other stays, backstays and shrouds (to have the same tension is likely to cause a deflection in the fore topmast stay). Must have been a little tricky.

Pete

 

Edited by piratepete007
additional comment on one of Mark's photos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those members intrigued by Mark's last comment regarding deflection of the foremast stay, they might be interested to know that through a mutual cooperation between Mark, Vince, Ken and myself, I am writing a collection of detailed files describing how the Royal William could be built [the files are freely available to anybody to download]. I have the greatest respect for these members who are currently showing a wealth of different skills in building the same ship and who allow me to collate what they are posting.

 

The following two images hopefully illustrate the problem in creating a suitable tension in the sprit topmast backstay that does not interfere too much with the alignment of the fore topmast stay.

Pete

Screenshot (13).png

Screenshot (14).png

Edited by piratepete007
correcting poor grammar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To those who may wish to look at a different slant to a Royal William build, have a look at this link which I received from Oliver Lippold. It is not in English but the photos are self explanatory. The build log starts by showing a brilliant carving of the head ornamentation by a friend of his and it is covered in 24 carat gold. Just a fantastic piece of craftsmanship.

 

http://www.wettringer-modellbauforum.de/forum/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=63518&pageNo=1

 

Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,  Yours is such an impressive build,  I can only concur with what other members have said. It has inspired me throughout my build and whilst I can't match the quality and attention to detail of yours it gives me a standard to try and get close to. Brilliant!

 

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update - I thought it would be a good time to take a break from rigging & work on the ship`s boat. The kit supplied boat is molde from resin & with some work it can be made to look presentable. The first picture shows the boat as supplied - the casting is very thick,so the first thing I did was thin it down with my dremel & sanding drum. Then I added a little sheer to it. The frames were added - only down to the bottom of the casting. Floor boards were then added - they hide the fact that the frames don`t go all the way down to the keel.A cap rail was the made along with a rubbing strake. The inside was painted yellow ochre along with the space between the cap rail & rubbing strake. The bottom was painted with a Floquil color called aged white.The rudder was then made with the hinges simulated by installing a couple of pins,then some black card stock was cut & glued on next to the pins & the pins were then glued to the added strip on the transom.  Finally, all the thwarts,foot boards.& thole pins were added. I did not make the masts or oars - didn`t want to hide all the work I did by filling up the inside of the boat with them. If anyone asks,they are stowed below decks;).

 

 

 

004.JPG.8067cd5cd62ce8c66cadb22299a186bf.JPG

 

003.JPG.67df98fb3a30136e6d19cf1309f41cbc.JPG59e0088a4fc48_004(2).JPG.e0f9cadf0c58946b7e31e7afbb45764a.JPG

 

005.JPG.655593648a959433f7d1806101acffb8.JPG

 

001.JPG.1d1712461763fb7541e8332fffbc34d2.JPG

 

008.JPG.c595690026f076050af460b05d3dff43.JPG

 

011.JPG.fae14aca5071a19ada6b8d4318275b78.JPG

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

A dramatic change from the supplied plastic resin hull supplied - as you say, it can be worked fairly easily and allows for much individuality in the process. Well done and attention to detail such as the risers, bottom boards, frames, foot stretchers and colour (sorry, 'color' over your way) all are a stand-out. It is an interesting point that the last re-fit of the Royal William occurred in the early part of the 18C and it was also during this time that the Admiralty insisted upon carvel construction instead of clinker. So it seems to me that either style is more than acceptable for this build.

Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Pete & Michael:D. I had thought of sanding down the outside  smooth,but after thinning down the inside,I was afraid it would be too thin to do that. The resin is much easier to work on  than plastic - it doesn`t melt when you grind on it. Sorry about the bad photos - I had to take about 20 pictures to get a few decent ones. Hard to get a good, sharp focus with my present camera.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

I am receiving a new boat from Euromodel in the next few days and just as an experiment, I will carefully trim down the outside to resemble a carvel build. Will let you know how it goes. By the way, your concept of partial frames looks like a much easier way to go and since it is not a scratch build, why not ?

Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Popeye - I am currently attaching all the footropes & blocks to the yards. The blocks are easy - the footropes are a pain. May have some pics in a couple of days. Still looking for some small wood parrel beads - I have some metal ones,but they look like,well,metal:(.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update - the footropes are finally done. I started by clamping a balsa board to my table & made two lines representing the length of the stirrups. The yard was then pinned down on the upper line. Then I bent a piece of 1mm brass wire into a u shape & pushed it into the board along the lower line. The stirrup ropes were tied around the yard & cut off long enough to wrap around the wire & with a small clamp holding a little tension on it,a seizing was made to make a small eye. Some diluted white glue  was applied to stiffen the ropes so they would hang straight. Lastly,the footropes were then ran through the eyes & tied off on the ends.

 

001.JPG.bad59e418558cf1506b1992ec57be835.JPG

 

59f2a51eaff18_001(2).JPG.dbcab1aee657a47a299c73b3092bc4be.JPG

 

002.JPG.8ebf974948e34598dbc7225d438d918e.JPG

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 The rigging of the bowsprit is now pretty much complete - quite the mess of ropes! Most of the sail handling lines were installed with the lines running through the blocks with a toggle on the ends to keep them from pulling through the blocks001.JPG.aa355c451c24dcb57615143ef3201c7d.JPG

 

003.JPG.f959b9d76b4bdea500fc32a5ec9de8aa.JPG

 

004.JPG.f676922370a590323338dee050f2f73e.JPG

 

005.JPG.2cb5bd52b913ac6b0d7f55807644c383.JPG

 

009.JPG.1ea226beec8d9d8699ffe58910e42dfd.JPG

 

Mark 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...