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America's Cup UK Challenger Endeavour 1934 by Julie Mo - Amati - Scale 1:35


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Starting this thread makes me feel like a teenager writing a book called, "How To Live Your LIfe." 

 

The kit finally arrived late today.

Endvr_01.jpg

 

It's late and I didn't want to open everything up so I just set up a quick photo shoot of the contents

Endvr_03.jpg

 

So far, the only problem I have is with the instructions.  You are probably asking yourself, "Because they are in Italian?"  No, because the print is so small! B)

 

The last time I built a model ship was in 1965 and it was plastic. This kit is made like an Oyster compared to that.  Since I can't afford an Oyster, this will do. :)

 

And I'm gonna to need a bigger work table.

Edited by Julie Mo
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This looks like it's going to be a beautiful boat. I look forward to seeing your progress. Anyway, as a fairly new member myself, I would like to give you some friendly advice; that being to take a look at the rules of naming a build log, before an older member yells at you for doing it incorrectly :)

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Hi Julie,

 

Very pleased that it finally arrived. I look forward to following your progress.

I know 3 rules of workbenches / tables as follows.

 

Rule 1 - The size of the workbench is inversely proportional to the tidiness of the owner.

Rule 2 - The bigger the workbench the more time spent looking for the tool needed.

Rule 3 - Workbenches larger than needed are ideal places to park tools which are not needed.

 

Keith.

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You're so right, Keith! 

 

Let's see...

Rule 1 - I need a bigger workbench

Rule 2 - I'll have to be more patient looking for tools

Rule 3 - I need to buy some useless tools to fill all that space

 

On a serious note, I opened up the full-sized plans this morning.  I found they include a dinghy with the kit.  Maybe that would be a good place to start.  I also realized just how big this thing is!  I knew the dimensions but my brain was in denial.  How do you move this once it's built?  I started to wonder if I should wait until we're in the new house.  But if I do that, I'll never start it because the house will get all the attention.  And I bought this to fill the days before we move. So forge ahead!

 

Plans_01.jpg

This will be fun!

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Hello Julie,

 

I didn't build the dinghy because the refurbished yacht relies on an inflatable. I did assemble and sand the frame and I and may get round to making it one day. I think it might be quite tricky as its planked without attaching the planks to the frame - so that it can be removed. Usually dinghys of this type are clinker rather than carvel built and I don't recollect this being covered in the instructions.

 

As to handling the Yacht  I think you will find it very easy until you attach the mast. This can be towards the end of the build and you should be able to get on without worrying about transport until the mast is attached. In my build I did make the mast removable - all the shrouds and stays attach to the deck with bolts and all the sheets etc, are tied to the deck fittings. I didn't explain this in the build, perhaps I should have done. You can see the attachment details in some of the photographs.

 

One thing you might like to consider before starting is how you want to display the model. I quite like having the model sat in a cradle once complete. If you go down this route you can get on with the build and worry about the cradle later (or alternatively use the one provided). Many builders however favour screwing dowels (metal or wood) into the keel. If you go down this route you will need to attach some form of captive nut arrangement into the frame.

 

By the way - very nice workshop. I would have gone into mourning If I'd had to leave it. 

 

Keith.

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Thank you, Keith!  As always, you are a wealth of knowledge.  I hope you don't mind I consider you my mentor for this build. 

 

I looked at the dinghy plan.  There are only 9 Figures (steps) in the instructions.  I had to look up "clinker" and "carvel" to know the difference but the images look like carvel and that is evident on only one Figure where they show nails being used on the bow and transom to secure the planks.

 

Dinghy_01.jpg

 

From what I see, the builder has to shape the hullform freehand.  I have some Auriou modeler's rasps that are a dream to work with and would make short order of this task but they are locked up with the Ark.  For the first time I'm seeing I will be handicapped without some of my hand tools (they have spoiled me.)

 

As for the mast, I have only glanced at the parts but it looks like the builder is supposed to end glue three dowel rods to form the mast.  End gluing creates a poor bond.  I'm wondering if I would be better off picking up a single dowel rod and tapering that instead of trying to end glue what comes with the kit.  (I am without my calipers, too)

 

When I picture the finished model, I find myself leaning toward building a pier with planks and pilings and setting it up like Endeavour just came in from a race.  I would flake the main and lay the genny and jib along the deck, still attached to the stays, with ties along the way.  I might even take it a step further and leave the lines more like what you'd see just after a race.  So there would be a bit of a mess.  I'm also thinking possibly creating some puddles on the deck.  I find sailboats most attractive when they look like they have just been sailed by sailors.

 

And of course, the dinghy (the instructions call it a lifeboat) would be at the dock, with items in it that may have been needed for backup supplies and materials.  I will have to research that further.  Obviously, if it had a motor, it could be more useful in that capacity.

 

I may not actually start on the build until next week.  The more I learn, the more there is to know. 

 

Thank you all for your help and encouragement.  I will take pictures of each step and post them as I go along.

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Hi Julie 

 

Its a bit late here so this may be a little brief.

 

My concern about the dinghy is that with only the bow and transom secured the planks will have a tendency to spring back to their former flat shape when removed from the frames. I had thought of trying to get a mid section frame in place to prevent this. I thought clinker might be better as the overlapping of the planks would give extra stiffness. I shaped the frames with a small sanding block. It took an hour or so. I think nailing is a bit optimistic as my guess is that the ends of the planks will split. I would be inclined to rely on glue but if you do nail I think pre drilling will be necessary. 

 

In my kit the dowels were half rounds and the mast dowels were staggered so the end joint was only ever half of the mast thickness. I had 5 half rounds from which to form the mast (2 half lengths and one full length on one side and 2 full lengths on the other) I found the segmented mast had the benefit of allowing me to get it very straight. I did hunt for a dowel long enough to avoid jointing but the ones I found all had an unacceptable degree of bend. You refer to 3 dowels - is your kit different to mine? I agree end jointing of 3 dowels would be useless.

 

The romance of your dock vision is compelling. Can you build a bar on it please?

 

I often sit on deck after a long day at sea (usually in the rain if its Scotland) sorting through the rats nest of lines that my fellow crew members have abandoned in favour of their gin and tonics. I get a bit OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) about rats nests. The practical point however is that lines dropped on a deck tend to collapse relatively flat to the deck as their weight overcomes the stiffness in the line. At model scale the opposite is true and the stiffness overcomes the weight. The result is that they stick up at odd angles and don't look very realistic. You might want to experiment before deciding which way to go.

 

Goodnight 

 

Keith

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The romance of your dock vision is compelling. Can you build a bar on it please?

 

I often sit on deck after a long day at sea (usually in the rain if its Scotland) sorting through the rats nest of lines that my fellow crew members have abandoned in favour of their gin and tonics. I get a bit OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) about rats nests. The practical point however is that lines dropped on a deck tend to collapse relatively flat to the deck as their weight overcomes the stiffness in the line. At model scale the opposite is true and the stiffness overcomes the weight. The result is that they stick up at odd angles and don't look very realistic. You might want to experiment before deciding which way to go.

 

Goodnight 

 

Keith

Thank you again, Keith.  I hope you awake well rested. :)

 

What kind of bar would you like?  :rolleyes:

 

Some of the best sails I've had is when I've been out in a bluster.  When you return to safe harbor, you are worn but oddly invigorated.  I used to race.  I have helmed many a race and I've been a scrub too.  When you get back from a sail that has tried to take everything out of you, there's a feeling hard to describe.  But it's wonderful.  I never leave the boat a mess, but I forgive myself if it's not picture perfect.  Before I head for the saloon, I take a look at her and if she looks well rested but not neglected, I turn with a smile and head for the bar.

 

Part of what motivates me to make this build is I want the finished product to re-spark sailing memories.  If it doesn't, it's just a decoration.

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I have read through the instructions and compared them to the drawings, several times if needed, and think I have a pretty good understanding how this build will go together.  At times, I see making minor modifications that would seem to make the build better in one way or another but, without so many of my tools available, it would probably be best not to change a thing.  However I will not proceed to the next step unless I am confident of the structural integrity.  I don't want this to be flimsy or overly delicate.

 

I had a chance to work for a bit this morning.  I took the two hull structure plywood sheets and labeled each of the pieces to match the instructions.  I'm glad I did it in pencil because I had to go back and make some changes.  The pictures in the instructions do not include dimensions and some of the pieces look alike.

 

Endvr_04.jpg

 

Next step will be making a dry assembly.  The only work table I could fashion from the furniture in the rental is in a room with very poor lighting.  Access to that room is by way of a tight spiral staircase.  At some point I will have to move down there permanently but for now I'll be working on fold-up snack tables.  Sure is different than an actual workbench!  :huh:

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Hi Julie

 

Once you get on to assembling the frames make sure that the assembled frames are "true". On mine their was a slight bow and a pronounced twist from bow to stern. Eyeballing the assembly by looking along the frames from the bow with your eye just above the deck level should reveal any distortion. The kit instructions suggest you temporarily nail the deck in place to control distortion during gluing. This might address the bowing but it does not provide sufficient rigidity to cure twist. You may recall that I found it necessary to bolt an oak plank to the deck to hold it true.

 

Did you resolve what you are going to do about jointing the mast?

 

I bought From "Enterprise to Endeavour" by Ian Dear to accompany my build. You might find it interesting.

 

Regards Keith.

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The first thing I found was the joints were very tight.  Snug is good.  Tight is bad.  From my woodworking I learned the joints should not be so tight that you can't get them apart.  The glue gets squeezed out, weakening the joint.  I also noticed a bit of a glaze where the laser cut the wood.  This might inhibit glue absorption. 

 

Endvr_08.jpg

I took out a 14 grain flat rasp to open up the joints

 

Endvr_09.jpg

Using a scrap piece to test fit

 

Endvr_10.jpg

Gotta make sure it fits all the way

Edited by Julie Mo
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Endvr_05.jpg

This piece needed to be inserted sideways

 

Endvr_06.jpg

Then turned at the slot.  It could not be turned at any other location.

 

Endvr_07.jpg

Even with the scrap test, this was as far as it would go without excessive pressure.  Since this is only a dry fit, it all has to come apart without breaking.

Edited by Julie Mo
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Bow section dry fit

Endvr_11.jpg

Having taken a rasp to each joint and test fitting over and over until snug really made a difference in working with this phase of the build.

 

Endvr_12.jpg

 

Endvr_13.jpg

 

What I have learned is taking your time to get it right is worth it (it usually is).  I also found I need a small vice to hold some pieces while taking a rasp to them.  And I found that building my first model on an ottoman in the living room and watching the Chicago Bears win is a pretty good Sunday afternoon. :)

Edited by Julie Mo
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Regarding the tight joints, I'm going to give Amati the benefit of a doubt and say they made them that way so you have to remove the burned wood from the laser cut.  By filing down the glaze, you expose fresh wood and this allows the glue to bond better.  But it certainly does add some time to the build.  I don't mind though, I bought the kit to keep me busy.

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It's normal to have to remove laser burn for both the reason that you already mentioned (glue adhesion) and because the laser cut is a slight cone shape, also to square up the edge of the wood.  This is true of all kits with laser cut parts, and it's better that the pieces be too tight, than too loose because they all need to be cleaned up and squared.

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Still in the dry fit stage...

 

As I have progressed, I am now marking every piece to establish orientation and joint identification.  Using a piece of scrap to check the roughed out slots isn't reliable as the thickness of the plywood changes just enough to change snug with the scrap to tight in the actual joint.  So I have changed to testing the fit against an area close to the actual joint.  That's why, to ensure things don't get mixed up when I disassemble it, I decided to mark all the pieces.

 

This is as far as I got last night:

Endvr_14.jpg

Assembling many pieces together increased the joint tightness, and the difficulty.  As you assemble what you've filed and fit, I've discovered not to try to file and fit anything already assembled.  It's much harder.  File each joint separately to snug before assembling. 

 

It also looks like I'll need several strong clamps, like the yellow ones in the picture.  I find as I start assembling several pieces together, one will slip out of the joint as the one I'm working on is seated in place.  This could turn badly quite quickly if glue has already been applied.  I'm going to pick up some more of those clamps today.  I'll also pick up some Titebond III, as it sets more slowly.

 

All of the fitting has been done by filing the length of the joint slotting.  But as I began assembling the deck beams I found this:

Endvr_15.jpg
I am now filing out the bottom of the slots to make the deck joints flush.  Once they are all flush and glued, I'll sand off the burnt glaze where the deck ply attaches.

 

That tiny metal-handled rasp I've been using creates hand fatigue.  I'll be looking for something to fashion up a handle.  If I had my workshop set up, I would have already visited the lathe.  This project is making me miss my workshop more and more.

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