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Julie Mo

America's Cup UK Challenger Endeavour 1934 by Julie Mo - Amati - Scale 1:35

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Oh what a mini shop to have with all those nice Byrnes tools, and all the accessories, too. But, ask Kirk would say, "Dream on Klingon!"

 

Got a reply from Crown.  Since they don't stock wood, they have to get it, mill it and then it's ready to send out.  But I should have it soon. 

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Now that I'm close to finishing the minor interruption in this build, remodeling the house :rolleyes:, I've been trying to motivate myself to get back to the model. 

 

I sort of painted myself into a corner when I modified the planking, but yesterday I decided to roll the dice and see what would happen.  The hull planking protruded from the stern making the kit piece for the stern deck useless.  I took a sanding block to it and started trimming away.  It's now even with the plywood top but there is a gap that needs to be filled between the deck and hull planking.  I'm looking at something to wrap the entire hull and come up flush with the finished deck.
352866237_Rail_011.jpg.6cca1325a55b3a0a956b4e8bda4021f5.jpg2033531657_Rail_021.jpg.5f9ca1be7c330afdf4e34cea63c5ee6b.jpg

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Next thing was what to do with the caulking?  While I was trying to see how to make the deck plank work with the above idea, I opened the drawer under the workbench top looking for some tape, I saw guitar binding.  I bought some for an acoustic but never used it.  The thinnest is 0.0115" but sold as 0.01".  The deck planks and binding aren't as tight as they would be finished but it seems to work and the plastic won't bleed.
Deck_001.jpg.314625b6a7b983b5b646e4001b109e01.jpg

When using plastic binding on guitars, acetone is used to glue it to the wood parts on the guitar.  Not sure how this would work for the decking but I'll experiment. 

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I just ran the test with the acetone.  I used 5 plank pieces and 4 binding strips (all 3" long) and put them on a cedar shim.  Then I pinned them in place and dropped acetone on the joints.  I waited until the acetone evaporated on top and took a violin plane to the binding.  Bad idea.  Then I used a card scraper.  Not good either.  Finally I just sanded the binding level with the planking.

Deck_002.jpg.4b7970b5517445901853fcabbafa6e1c.jpg

The planks and binding are glued pretty well to the cedar shim.  But I should have waited longer for the acetone to do it's job.  I had pretty well soaked the test piece because I wanted to make sure it got through to the base.  Some of the uneven appearance is due to the binding still being soft when I was knocking it down. 

 

The plane would probably work fine as long as the binding has hardened.  Same with the card scraper.  I think this could be what I was looking for.

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Forging ahead with this idea, I took the floor from the helm station and proceeded to lay down the "teak" decking. 

Deck_003.jpg.0e382c97120da92b8e530195d2306c4a.jpg
It was pretty time consuming.  I started at the center by placing 2 planks with a strip of binding between them and applied acetone.  It held pretty well.  This was followed by binding, plank, acetone, hold in place for about 10 seconds and repeat.  While I know many here are amazing working with tiny parts but that is not my skill.  :wacko:

 

After several planks had been laid, I realized I needed a better tool to hold the pieces in place for both the application of acetone and keeping pressure until it set.  The first attempt was taking a piece of wood and cutting a dado slightly narrower than the plank width and slightly shallower than the plank thickness. 

Deck_004.jpg.0a8535659dc67f27b722e4548236222e.jpg

It worked well enough for this job but something better needs to be designed for the main part of the deck.  Other things that would help is the binding being closer to the thickness of the plank. 

Deck_005.jpg

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I don't have an example handy, but for most of my veneer decking, bulkheads & etc. I glue it on to very thin paper. such as tracing paper off of the ship.  I then glue that onto the boat or sub-assembly in one piece.

If this sounds interesting to you, I will dig up an example..

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On 11/12/2019 at 5:30 PM, Julie Mo said:

The plane would probably work fine as long as the binding has hardened. 

Julie - the card version for comparison - sanded but not sealed

 

fullsizeoutput_1e4f.thumb.jpeg.a2debfe12e96458afe70da3c8211e55f.jpeg

And sealed with 7 coats of matt poly.

DSC09455.thumb.JPG.4d556582329b18bb675d2406ddd50e51.JPG

 

Edited by KeithAug

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On 11/13/2019 at 2:28 PM, Gregory said:

I don't have an example handy, but for most of my veneer decking, bulkheads & etc. I glue it on to very thin paper. such as tracing paper off of the ship.  I then glue that onto the boat or sub-assembly in one piece.

If this sounds interesting to you, I will dig up an example..

Yes, please do.  I'd love to see it.

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8 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Julie - the card version for comparison - sanded but not sealed

 

fullsizeoutput_1e4f.thumb.jpeg.a2debfe12e96458afe70da3c8211e55f.jpeg

And sealed with 7 coats of matt poly.

DSC09455.thumb.JPG.4d556582329b18bb675d2406ddd50e51.JPG

 

Keith, for some reason I am remembering seeing your card method bleeding a bit.  That's why I experimented with the guitar binding.  But your pics show a very clean edge.  Is this Altair?

 

Guitar binding is a bis "snaky" in that it wants to squirm out of anything trying to contain it.

Edited by Julie Mo

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1 hour ago, Julie Mo said:

Yes, please do.  I'd love to see it.

After I offered to show you an example, I went through a lot of my files, and really couldn't find a good example, so I put together a quick demo.

 

Basically,  I start with some tracing paper..

veneer1.jpg.c7acaa0ad6319c0f8ce0670a5e760188.jpg

Which I overlay on the part of the plans I wish to veneer.

veneer2.jpg.87b53da3d24872af6db84c9b30e6de90.jpg

Then I take the veneer strips and glue them to the tracing paper with white or yellow glue.  I use colored pencil to highlight the edges when desired..

 

veneer3.jpg.6a5cfcdc355a6d22a241166e0a822368.jpg

Once the pattern is complete, I can sand and add finish ( poly or whatever ), before cutting out the finished piece and adding it to the model..

I find this convenient, if I decide to do it over without having to strip it off of the model.

The above picture is not a good example of a finish I would find acceptable.   It was done quickly to show my method.

 

If you look at my Gretel in the Gallery, all of the deck pieces were prepared in this manner.

 

If I  haven't made my method clear, please ask me any questions..

Edited by Gregory

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On 11/14/2019 at 10:59 PM, Julie Mo said:

Is this Altair?

Julie - this one is Germania. You can find it in the scratch build section. I have described the deck build in some detail.

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While I was going through Keith's Germania build, the light bulb went on that I need to mark lines on the deck for reference.  I began by using a center finder ruler and making marks at 1/4" apart.  But it was difficult to precisely make those marks using these old eyes.

 

Then another light bulb went on when I realized I have an Incra center finding ruler that has holes in it every 1/32" that fit 5mm lead.  No need to rely on the eyes as much.

Deck_006.jpg.b60d23661bf1a77cae873c19a733ebc9.jpg

After laying down those marks I finished up the reference lines.

Deck_007.jpg.7bcff7a66918cdafff4a80cbe3292675.jpg

What I want to do next is decide where I want hatches that will be flush with the deck.  I want it to look something like this:

Spirit-52-deck-1100x300.jpg.e36e9cf4a2b06144f222bd4fbc9c88bd.jpg

This is the deck of a 53' Spirit.  The modifications I began earlier were based on a Spirit 130.

Edited by Julie Mo

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Now that the laundry room and one bathroom are done, and the boat is in pretty good shape, I can get back to the model.

 

I've been playing with how I'm going to move forward on the planking and finding hot hide glue not quite as easy to work with when I can't pin the planks down to the deck.  The plywood top is far more resistant to pinning than balsa.  But I did manage to lay two planks along each rail to get things started.

 

Next was to see how I might go about gluing and securing the planking throughout the deck work.  I'm using black cardstock for the joints.  It's twisted from cutting it into strips and a bit uncooperative.

Deck_001.jpg.1b6b4e74f6f28242b2fcd04eee84d46b.jpg

I'm wondering if CA glue would be an option.  Any suggestions?

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While rereading the articles on decking, I saw the suggestion of taking a pencil and using it to darken the edges of the planks, to mimic the black caulking.  An idea popped into my head, "Why not glue black card stock to the edges of the planking before laying them down?"

 

I laid PVA glue on the paper then set a group of planks on their side over it.  Then I laid a board over that and applied pressure.

Deck_010.jpg.a0647b155c473dfd98ba6f292b99aef3.jpg

An edge shot before gluing

Deck_011.jpg.56d733ffe133df6c2b4b5ae026557d48.jpg

After the glue had dried, I used a razor knife (not the Exacto in the pic) to separate the planks from each other.  The paper split where I didn't slice it clean through.  Next round I'll try the Exacto.

Deck_012.jpg.b7791d3bb92ca5657384749749586168.jpg

But when I pushed the planks together, it closed the tear in the paper.  These planks are not glued, they are just resting on the plywood board.  When squeezed together, they create a fairly clean joint.

Deck_013.jpg.86308c72c7532ab103fbad15e62559ac.jpg

So far, it is looking promising.  Sure would be nice not to have to try to set the plank and paper at the same time.

 

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Thank you for the thumbs up!  It's much appreciated.

 

I was playing with different deck plank designs when, just before I dozed off last night, I came up with something I wanted to try today.  But first I had to find some darker woods, which I didn't have already milled.  I settled on padauk, not the best grain-wise but the color was just want I wanted.  The stock I have has a lot of red in it.

 

All my milling tools are for full-sized lumber but I was able to resaw, joint, resaw, etc until I had three strips close to the thickness of the deck planks I purchased.  I was then able to use the drum sander to get it to the same thickness as the other planks.  But how to cut them into the same width?  A full-sized table saw isn't the answer.  Then the light bulb clicked on.

 

Years ago I made a table for a Milwaukee Porta Band I have.  I've used it for cutting conduit and Unistrut but I needed a table to cut up some metal wall tiles.  It worked pretty well.  

 

So I took it out to see how it would work cutting the padauk strips to width.

Deck_014.jpg.d0467e1898b24d82beef9be177b4f036.jpg

Not bad!

 

Next was to test my idea.  I ran two padauk planks down the center.  On the port side I taper cut the birch planks to butt up to the padauk center planks.  On the starboard side I would add a padauk insert so the birch plank would butt at 90 degrees.  Sort of creating a saw-tooth design with the padauk.  (imagine the padauk plank to the left of the tape is birch)

Deck_015.jpg.9ca1dfc63231dadbbc093c0f754350f0.jpg

I'm leaning toward the saw-tooth design.

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More playing around with the deck patterns.  With this plan I'd be using the padauk to surround the hatches, to break up the monotony a bit. 

Deck_016.jpg.5aa883a2567251b152b8f6b68c778d83.jpg

Deck_017.jpg.755b4b99c1956a956b09f6ec018b1c58.jpg

I like the cleaner look of this layout but am still not committed.  Isn't it a woman's prerogative to change her mind?

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