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Hi Slog,

 

Your sheave looks brilliant, great work. :) and a good soution for making them.

 

Sorry to hear about your anchor but you made a good save :). Have you tried using electrical solder and an electric or gas soldering iron? I have used them with success on up to 1.5mm brass wire, it has a lower melting point than silver solder

Hi Jeff,I have a 30w soldering iron and some electrical solder so will try that the next time I have any soldering close to possible melting material!  The anchor ring isn’t under any stress so CA will do.

 

Thanks for the comment Mick

 

Slog, nice save and it looks like you might have a way of making sheaves too. 0.8mm slices on the rod/tube...hmm perhaps mark and spin it on your drill/dremel/drill press? Maybe using a razor saw as it spins? I have the same challenges coming up, kind of brain storming on your build..... ;)

 

On your ring situation if low temp electrical solder doesnt work or isnt strong enough there are these tweezers I have been eyeballing myself at Micro Mark, I wonder if they might work for you.  http://www.micromark.com/heat-sink-soldering-tweezer,7064.html

 

sam

Hi Sam, I might try solid brass rod and take slices off the end as needed.  I was also wondering about trying Evergreen or equivalent styrene sheet to cut the sheaves from as would definitely be quicker and easier to cut and trim.

 

A quick paint, as obviously can’t blacken them and they are done.  For all you can see of sheave once its in place I think it may be a viable alternative.  I may try that also.

 

Nice work on that sheave Slog. Might try that on the Granado, I've just previously file the grooves out without putting a sheave in but your method looks way better.

Hi Wayne, I have also drilled and cut grooves to simulate sheaves and have been happy with the result up to now, but because the davit had an open end sheave I had to fill the gap somehow.

 

When I get to the masts and yards which I believe are dotted throughout with various sheaves I might try some other techniques and materials to see what works.

 

 

A bit more progress with the anchors.  I previously mentioned that the grooves in the anchor stocks were to deep so here is a dark and blurry photo to show the gap with the two halves together.

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To overcome this I glued in some 1mm walnut strip in to each groove in the stock, which then made the gap to small.  It was a case of filing the grooves back in with a miniature file until the anchor shank sat deeper in the stocks.

I was going to leave a gap between the stocks and bend the ends together like a real anchor but wasn’t happy with the way they looked so took some artistic licence and continue to file the grooves until the stock halves fitted together the full length.

 

Next up was to do the puddening on the anchor rings.  I used my pliers and a clamp as a kind of helping hand.

 

post-273-0-00411800-1383380512_thumb.jpg

 

 

With the puddening I found a thread on MSW which mentioned that 0.25mm thread would be suitable so that’s what I used.  I have no idea how to start and end the puddening.  I tried a dab of CA glue to fix the end to the ring then wound my way round.  Once I got to the end I used CA again to fix it but not happy with this method.

post-273-0-43342300-1383380519_thumb.jpg

 

 

I also tried various media as I worked round the ring to hold the thread in place.  Initially I tried using watered down PVA but this appeared to bulk up the thread.  I also tried using Caldercraft Flat matt varnish which worked very well as dries invisible so used that.  I would wind along a bit and then varnish then continue.  Again I don’t know a way to secure the ends.

post-273-0-93110300-1383380531_thumb.jpg

 

 

I used brown Guttermann cotton thread to do the extra bits round the puddening (don’t know the term for this) but yet again don’t know how to start or finish.

post-273-0-83920500-1383380541_thumb.jpg

 

As can be seen in the finished photo the puddening itself isn’t bad and settled into a rhythm to do this BUT the start and finishing is terrible and lets it down. Also not happy with extra brown bits as my spacing went awry as well as being clumsily executed.  I will cut the whole lot off and try again.

 

If anyone has a method for starting and finishing the puddening I would like to hear from you.

 

Cheers

Slog

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi guys,

 

Well finished my anchors today.  Still a bit unhappy with the puddening though.  I cut off the puddening and the additional whipping from the last post and started again.

 

I feel got these done a bit better than before and to be honest I think these are as good as I am gonna get them.  I tried to do the whipping again and after doing 2 anchors (8 whips) I gave up on them.  To be honest the time spent on them for mediocre at best isn’t worth it as I can’t get them looking acceptable so only did 2 and left off the other 2.

 

I used CA glue to start and finish the puddening and then when finished waved the rings over a cigarette lighter to remove the fuzz.  It also darkened the thread a little which is fine.

post-273-0-20840700-1384672566_thumb.jpg

 

 

To attach the stock halves I applied CA glue to recess on one half and positioned it on the anchor shaft.  Then using PVA coated the other half and clamped together

post-273-0-67534300-1384672582_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-35487700-1384672601_thumb.jpg

 

 

The plans say to replicate the iron banding with the black cartridge paper cut to 2mm wide strips. I used PVA applied with a brush to the paper and pressed into position and continued my way round the stocks.  The plans don’t mention any dimensions so after a look at the plans and the AOTS I settled on 5mm in from the ends and 5mm out from the anchor shaft.

post-273-0-89580100-1384672613_thumb.jpg

 

 

All finished, as can be seen there are 2 with whipping and 2 without.  I will get over it.  The stocks and ‘bands’ were given a couple of coats of wipe on poly (applied by brush) and then went over the shafts touching in any scrapes and scratches with metal black paint.

post-273-0-03578800-1384672624_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-16902900-1384672634_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers

Slog

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Hi Slog, the seizings around the anchor rings are generally known as snake seizings.  Two should be next to the anchor shaft and two at the sides of the ring so as not to interfere with the cable.  I reommend smaller thread for these seizings. 

 

Thus the two seizings next to the shaft will hide the start and finish of the puddening.  Cool, eh?  And if your worl looks good to you with opti visors, it will look great to those without such assistance. 

 

Persevere, and have fun~!  You are doing nice work.

 

Duff

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Nic work Slog. I think Caldercraft have skimped on detail with the anchors to make things easier, the stocks should start to taper at the inner iron band and should taper both ways so that the ends are still square but half the width of the centre of the stock.

Steve

Edited by shipaholic
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Hi Slog, the seizings around the anchor rings are generally known as snake seizings.  Two should be next to the anchor shaft and two at the sides of the ring so as not to interfere with the cable.  I reommend smaller thread for these seizings. 

 

Thus the two seizings next to the shaft will hide the start and finish of the puddening.  Cool, eh?  And if your worl looks good to you with opti visors, it will look great to those without such assistance. 

 

Persevere, and have fun~!  You are doing nice work.

 

Duff

 

Great work Slog

It's all about taking that extra little step

It makes everything look so much better  :cheers: 

 

Slog,

I think your anchors look just great.

Sam

 

Hi Slog,

 

Great job on the anchors they look fantastic :)  :) 

 

Thanks Duff, Mick, Sam and Jeff for the comments and everyone for the 'Likes' Although not perfect I am pretty happy with them but as usual lessons to be learned. :)

 

 

Nic work Slog. I think Caldercraft have skimped on detail with the anchors to make things easier, the stocks should start to taper at the inner iron band and should taper both ways so that the ends are still square but half the width of the centre of the stock.

Steve

 

Hi Steve thanks for the comments, after reading your comment I checked the AOTS and you are correct of course I see the stocks should be square on all sides between the inner banding.  I also notice that I could have made the paper banding half the width the plans say to look more correct.  I really need to remember and check the AOTS as I work on things  :)

 

 

 

Well this update is pretty disappointing as despite having 6 days home alone with no one to bother me I only did the ships boats cradles on the middle deck and a half arsed start on the bow sprite (more of which later) what a waste of a good modelling opportunity :( .  The long boat sitting on the cradle was completed a couple of years ago waiting for this day  :D

post-273-0-03608000-1385789441_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-50335000-1385789453_thumb.jpg

 

 

Photos 3 to 7 are included for no other reason than to provide some encouragement to me as enthusiasm is starting to wane a bit.

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I mentioned above about the bow sprite, I came across a bit of a problem as can be seen in the photo below.  The top of the Stem provides the correct angle for the bow sprite but as can be seen the end of the bow sprite (BS) hits the bitts to far up.  The BS should be flattened on the bottom to hit the deck and have a notch to go into the bottom of the bitt.

post-273-0-58960100-1385789518_thumb.jpg

 

 

I think this must be a problem with the kit and not my error because if I move the bitt back to allow the BS to contact the deck properly then the bitt will be to close to the foremast hole or even over it.  The foremast hole is predetermined so I couldn’t have messed that up.

 

I have 4 options as I see it;

1)      Leave as is

2)      Cut the stem down to bring the BS down

3)      Cut a rectangular slot in the underside of the BS to bring it down

4)      Cut/file a circular groove into the top of the stem to bring the BS down

 

Personally option 2 is out as I don’t think I can do it without getting the angle wrong or damaging near by components. Option 1 is easiest obviously and probably wouldn't have been noticed except by the most eagle eyed of you. ;)

 

I think options 3 or 4 would be most satisfactory way to do this but bear it still won’t bring the BS down as far as the plans show but the end of the BS would be better positioned against the bitts.

 

Any advice or thoughts on this would be appreciated.

 

Cheers

Slog

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Hi Slog

 

Gee the photos look good.

I think you should try option 2. The stem should be level or almost level with the gunwale. If you have a Dremel or similar it should be easy to sand down the stem then clean it up with a file.

 

Steve

Edited by shipaholic
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Hi Slog

I just went back and had a look at my Endeavour

I sanded the bottom of the BS flat.

If you think it will help I can take a picture tomorrow and post it

That will be more fun than doing housework :)

 

Regards

Ken 

Hi Ken,

 

I would appreciate some photos greatly.  I had a look at some of yours from MSW1.0 but they are a bit small, but it looks like your BS is shaped exactly like the plans and fit in the space properly so more photos would be helpful. Cheers

 

Hi Slog,

sorry to see this.

I would go for Option 4, as it was pretty common on most of the ships to shape the top of the stem post to accept the BS.

Hi Edward, I just had a look at some more of the plan sheets and it appears that the top of the stem is flush with the rail which means the best way I think would be to chop off the top of the stem as close to the rail as possible as per the photo below and fix any damage that may (will!!) occur.

 

Hi Slog

 

I think you should try option 2. The stem should be level or almost level with the gunwale. If you have a Dremel or similar it should be easy to sand down the stem then clean it up with a file.

 

Steve

Hi Steve, was busy replying above and decided Option 2 would be the best way after all when your reply came in  :o  LOL

 

Cheers

Slog

post-273-0-68954600-1385794318_thumb.jpg

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Hi Guys,

 

Thanks for the nice comments.

 

Glad to see you will soon be getting back to your Endeavour Rowand.

 

Ken thanks greatly for the photos, much appreciated and gives me something visually to go by.  Your Endeavour looks great, pity the log was lost in the great crash and we never got to see the finished article.  Might be an idea to post it in the finished gallery so we can enjoy it in its entirety. Thanks again.

 

Cheers

Slog

 

Hi Greg, thanks for dropping by. I am going to cut the stem back as much as I can to drop it. I think it will be a compromise between keeping the angle right and dropping it enough so the deck end looks correct without hitting the bumpkin supports.  If it comes out looking as good as Kens photos above I will be happy.

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Hi Ken, thanks for that, much appreciated.  Definitely will have questions about the masts also  :)

 

As discussed earlier the best solution was to trim the top of the stem down to the bulwarks rail.  I used a carpenters square placed on top of the stem and slid the rule down to the rail to keep the correct angle and set the depth.  Then a craft knife was used to score a line against the end of the rule to mark the cut line.

post-273-0-69108100-1385874770_thumb.jpg

 

 

I was concerned that using a saw close to the rails would result in them getting chewed up so needed to protect them somehow.  I initially thought of using some layers of masking tape but was still worried the teeth would rub through this so ended up cutting and bending some 0.5mm brass sheet.

post-273-0-01213700-1385874774_thumb.jpg

 

 

Because of the position of the catheads I couldn’t fit the razor saw in so made the initial cuts with a hacksaw blade which was very slow as could only make very short strokes to prevent hitting anything.  Once the cut became deeper there was enough space to get the razor saw in but was still restricted to making short strokes.

post-273-0-02772900-1396695821_thumb.jpg

 

 

Once I removed the top I used a file to clean up the surface and then wrapped some sand paper round the bowsprit and used that as a sanding dowel to put a curve into the stem for the bowsprit to sit in.

post-273-0-64580500-1385874781_thumb.jpg

 

 

The following photos show the curved sanded seat for the bowsprit and it in position.

post-273-0-35850100-1396695824_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-19198100-1396695827_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-60961100-1396695831_thumb.jpg

 

 

Okay, the above work dropped the bowsprit down to a much better position although the flat on the bottom of the bowsprit is still not as much as indicated on the plans but at least it now butts up against in the bitt in a better position.

 

As it is right now it can’t go down any further as it hits the bumpkin end support which I already knocked a corner off for it to fit and to be honest if I left it as it is above I would be happy.

 

But once I taper the mast down as indicated in the plans that will allow a bit more space between it and the bumpkin support so I will be able to further sand the top of the stem to bring it down further.

 

Thanks for everyone’s interest and input.

 

Cheers

Slog

Edited by Captain Slog
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Lovely job sorting that Slog

Obviously a lot different to mine

But I am not going to worry too much

The biggest difference I think between yours and mine

And I keep saying it

Is the quality of the woods

They really make you want to get it perfect

I can't see me ever doing a totally bashed build as I just don't have the kit, or indeed the room for the kit

But that would certainly get you into the mindset to get it as perfect as possible

Keep up that faultless work Slog

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi guys,

 

Thanks for all the encouraging comments.  Looking forward to seeing another Endeavour build Ross.

 

As anyone who stops by my log knows I tend to jump around a bit and this post is no different  :D  (keeps me interested and stops me getting bored).  Since I needed to get back and do some work as I have been pretty slack lately, but not in the mood for wood working, I headed back to the stern to work on the ships lantern again.

 

 

I had previously finished the lantern and was pretty happy with it but it is very top heavy and teeters on the end of a 1mm brass rod support, which due to me drilling the hole in the stern a bit oversize it was going to be vulnerable to the slightest knock.

post-273-0-70855000-1396695943_thumb.jpg

 

 

From looking through the AOTS I knew it had side supports which triangulates the whole lantern making it very secure so decided to try this, plus it meant doing some more soldering which I enjoy.  After deciding the position of the support legs and temporary placing the lantern in the stern I took some measurements and then cut out a small 11mm x 8mm card template to bend the support legs to.

post-273-0-22053600-1388204412_thumb.jpg

 

 

After bending to the triangular shape and bending the ends straight for fitting into the stern holes I filed a small groove in the point to accept the 1mm vertical upright.  I did want to make the side support legs from 0.7mm rod so there was a noticeable difference in the diameters but only had 0.8mm which doesn’t have the same effect.

post-273-0-30960400-1388204418_thumb.jpg

 

 

To solder together I drilled a couple of holes in some MDF and stuck the legs into and then taped the vertical support in place.  I applied some silver solder paste with a needle to the join which can just be seen in the photo, but in retrospect I could have used a bit more.

post-273-0-99326700-1388204421_thumb.jpg

 

 

Soldered joint complete and after trial fitting and tweeking the fit I dropped it in to hydrochloric acid for a soak and then into the blackening solution.

post-273-0-82657600-1388204424_thumb.jpg

 

 

Whilst the support was blackening I decided to make a sort of escutcheon plate to tidy up the area where the stand enters the stern and to hide my slightly oversize hole.  I used the black cartridge paper (this stuff is great and have used it throughout the build) and using a 3mm and 1mm hollow punch made the escutcheon plate.  I just had to remember to slip it on the support BEFORE gluing the lantern to the hull.

post-273-0-74964500-1396695946_thumb.jpg

 

 

After a final trial fit I glued the lantern in place and then the whole assembly to the three holes drilled in the stern.  I slipped the escutcheon plate down to the hull and used wip-on poly applied with a little paint brush to fix the plate in place and job done.

post-273-0-91142600-1396695949_thumb.jpg

post-273-0-62439600-1388204433_thumb.jpg

 

 

Cheers

Slog

Edited by Captain Slog
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