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Tools That Are a Waste.


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So I remember this topic from the old forum and I thought it good to start a new thread where people can reccommend which tools not to buy for us newbies.

 

Although I don't have one or ever bought it, the Loom-A-Line got quite a bit of attention on the old thread as being a waste of money so maybe we can start off with that!

 

-Aaron

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Guest midnight

You can add loom-a-line , another tool that just sits in the useless tool draw . But as Andy said , there's an article on useless tools not to bother with in the Articles and downloads on the home page .  

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I recently bought a Mantua Strip Clamp in the hope that it would assist me in preparing strip wood for planking (the wood supplied by Panart is a much use as firewood as anything else). When I checked to see how accurate it was, I found that the center area was a good 1.2 mm lower than the ends. That's OK if you want to make planks that are bowed in the middle. My solution to the problem was to remove the metal strips and sand the top face on a sheet of glass. Things are now quite accurate.

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i bought this tool to hold small pieces so you can sand shape them better. its basicaly handle with a vice and 4 ,etal pins that fit in the holes on top

i have tried to use it a few times : either the piece drops or moves or you have clamp marks

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Jay, without looking for your Calculator (it's somewhere underneath those plans in the corner) what is 7 13/16" in Metric? ;)

 

:cheers:  Danny

(7+13/16)x25.4 mm is the answer. I never said that I don't use a calculator, Danny. Mine is much easier to take out of the drawer right in front of me. I would have more problems finding a paper conversion chart and if you have a smart phone you have a calculator right there.

 

 

That is no longer true. The 'standard' is 25.4 mm to the inch. It used to be based on the meter but a few years ago that was changed.

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The Loom-a-line is not very useful. If you construct the ratlines with this, rigging the whole assembly on to the ship is a difficult task. It is much easier to rig the shrouds in pairs. The only thing good about this tool is that it does make it easier to space the rattlings more uniformly.

 

Vince P.

So I remember this topic from the old forum and I thought it good to start a new thread where people can reccommend which tools not to buy for us newbies.

 

Although I don't have one or ever bought it, the Loom-A-Line got quite a bit of attention on the old thread as being a waste of money so maybe we can start off with that!

 

-Aaron

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If you wish to be pedantic - the calculator (8 digits) conversions are 25.399956 and 0.0393701

 

It would be kinda tough to measure out to 5 significant places.  :)   When I was in Engineering the rule was:  "Measure with a laser inferometer.  Mark it with a piece of chalk.  And cut it with an axe." :D  :D  :D

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Was that mm or cm or dm?? I thought that it was 2.54 cm to the inch. Really the last two hold outs the US of A and Liberia. We both us the good old British Imperial system and the rest of you blokes use metric.

As far as change over it would be easy. Most of out stuff comes in and it's metric already. Try to us an old set of sockets on a new car. You really need both sets.

 

What is so funny is the idea that folks can measure out to that last place anyway. Look at the post above by Mark to get the idea.

 

Later 42rocker

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1) As far as change over it would be easy. Most of out stuff comes in and it's metric already. Try to us an old set of sockets on a new car. You really need both sets.

 

2) What is so funny is the idea that folks can measure out to that last place anyway. Look at the post above by Mark to get the idea.

 

Later 42rocker

1) I always thought that seeing a sign advertising: "3/8 drive metric socket sets" was hilarious, but the alternative would be replacing all of our ratchets, extensions and breaker bars...

 

I have to admit that my professional life would be a lot easier if everyone just used metric, instead of the hodge-podge mixture depending on vendor and client that we have in the U.S.

 

2) I'd love to see someone hold 5 places on a Sherline or Micro-lux, or a sanding block--On second thought, after seeing some of the work posted here, some of you guys probably can...

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Was that mm or cm or dm?? I thought that it was 2.54 cm to the inch. Really the last two hold outs the US of A and Liberia. We both us the good old British Imperial system and the rest of you blokes use metric.

As far as change over it would be easy. Most of out stuff comes in and it's metric already. Try to us an old set of sockets on a new car. You really need both sets.

You are only considering socket wrenches? What about all the machine tools used in the USA, and the building industry's use of lumber, steel rods, aluminum extrusions, etc. etc. 

What about replacing all the nuts and bots,. taps and dies, rulers, etc.. Easy? I don't think so.

Will it happen gradually? May be, but not completely in our life times.

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You should see my toolbox at work. Maintenance on cnc machinery and metal parts fabrication.  We have machine built in america from the 1940's to present, then we also have machines from Japan, Germany, England, Australia, Sweden, China, Taiwan, just to name a few. Some were partially built overseas then finished here, makes it a real nightmare to work on them   :blink:

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"""You are only considering socket wrenches? What about all the machine tools used in the USA, and the building industry's use of lumber, steel rods, aluminum extrusions, etc. etc."""

lumber as it is it's not true size anyway---

steel rods and many other items are measured in other units as it stands now. #3 or #5 rebar come to mind

names are about all that need to be changed.

"""What about replacing all the nuts and bots,. taps and dies, rulers, etc.. Easy? I don't think so."""

Sears carries all of the metric stuff now. Our industry's are held back because they have to use two standards -- one for the US and Liberia and another set if they want to do business with the rest of the world.

Talk to anyone from Germany or any country there and ask how easy it is to use metric.

One other thing that might scare a lot of folks is the fact that most engineering folks and those in the tool and die industry don't use fractions like those in the building industry. They use the decimal system. Which is very close to the metric system. Also you will find that a lot of measuring tools one push of a button and it's into metric or the system that America uses the old British Imperial system. My lathe will cut threads in the inch system or the metric system as another point. China will build machines for the US using whatever system but most of the tools that they build are in metric.

 

After all George Washington used to measure in rods. A good old standard. Know what a rod is in feet? or Yards if you prefer? Also several of the industry's in America use their own systems. Weighted anything in pennyweights lately? Or Dram's? Or carets? They are used everyday here in the States and most folks have not a clue as to what they are. Long ton or a ton or a short ton. How about a peck? or a cord? or the fun one, acre of land? How many rods is that or square yards or square feet.

 

Also check out hexnut's post about this.

 

Mark

In having more fun with this had a survey done a few years ago and they claimed .001 feet on their figures. I totaled up one side and the 100.000 ft came out to 100.1 when you added everything up. LOL. Some folks don't understand that if you state 2.54 inches that means that you could measure to .005 inches in order to place the .04 part of it correctly.

How thick is that pencil line?? Cut middle or right side or left side. LOL

 

Later 42rocker

Edited by 42rocker
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I was brought up with centimeters, meters, kilograms, etc. I would love to convert this British inheritance of measuring in inches, feet and miles.

All I am saying is that is not going to happen universally, not in mine nor your lifetime. Hopefully I will be wrong, but there will be lots of other businesses besides what is imported and exported to the US. I mentioned the building trades for one.

 

I am still working from drawings that show my model in fractional inches and the first thing I do is use decimal inches (my vernier calipers and 6 inch ruler, for example). These kits are made in China or where ever, so why not change that first? We now have blocks and other parts that are listed in inches and some in mm. What size lumber do you use for planking? Now that is crazy for such a small market.

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Even NASA got it wrong with the Mars Climate orbiter which crashed because of:

 

The primary cause of this discrepancy was engineering error. Specifically, the flight system software on the Mars Climate Orbiter was written to take thrust instructions using the metric unit newtons (N), while the software on the ground that generated those instructions used the Imperial measure pound-force (lbf). This error has since been known as the "metric mixup" and has been carefully avoided in all missions since by NASA.[16]

 

Never mix units!  Well, except for ratchet drives   ;)  

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