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Moony

*WRECKED* Vernon Langille 1979 by Moony - a 34' Tancook Whaler 1/24 - small - First wooden ship build

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Hello to all of you...

 

"Every voyage starts with the first step." is an old Japanise saying... so I'll step foreward in a brandnew terrain to me.

 

The kitfree built I start is about a Nova Scotia Museum's Tancook Whaler built in 1979 and still afloat - last known pictures are from the Small Reach Regatte 2014 - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?161372-A-celebration-of-small-schooners  - she was driven by John Eastman and Ben Fuller. My information is from the book of Rob. C. Post "The Tancook Whalers - Origins, Reduiscovery and Revival". The drwaings with in are very fine and - as I enlarged them they stayed fine. The planset can be found on page 62 and 63 the also scaled sail plan is printed on page 81. (If I'm lucky with building this schooner - I'll buy the Chapelle plans from the Smithsonian.

 

 So I decided to dare the first scatchbuilt with a small boat in a big scale.. so the result will be one foot long - as long as  a modern Tamiya tankkit. 

 

It's a really tricky thing you do!!! My deference to all of you... 

...modelbuilding without any even semi-manufactured model part... a completly new experience to a modelbuilder spoiled by Tamiya oder Dragon kits. So thinks differ a lot to plasic kit building.

 

:blink:

 

Okay I got it - the hull is bult upside down... and the  bulkheads are rectangular to two planes - the baseboard as the the CWL. 

the bulkheads are slipped in the mortises of the baseboard -  looking that CWL comes equal to CWL. I've bought some 4mm plywood for the innerhull (the stem and stern are 4mm thick. And I've got a flat 12mm plywood pice fore the yardboard I'll vave to fits everything on. I#ve found this very often in here - so I copied this.

 

This is what I got by leafing through the webside. But now I've got some questions left:

 

But how do I get the stem and stern to the basebaord - can I glue them to it? 

I think I'll have to look at every singe bulkhaead if it is open to the top my comparing with the profile drawing - and the drawing the new lineing in there - is that right? 

 

Thanks for your intrest and your answers.

 

Yours,

Moony

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Edited by Moony

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And as I was in a good mood I worked on and identified the bulkheads and made some progress in understanding plans. The waterlineplan is like a  mountan map with contour lines . For you some interesting drawings from the book I found them very helpful. They are showing some further detail... and giving a realistic picture to the threesided drawings. Showing the cut-lines for the bulkheads through the hull. 

 

And the topview of the hull is detailed without lines - but my sideview with all teh details has no detailed lines for the bulkheads - so I'll have to copy this plan again and draw the bulkheadspositions in there. 

 

Am I still on the right trap with my thoughts?

 

 

edit:

I had to delete the last picture due to teh fact that both  boats were pinkes (I learned to see the diffrence in the thumbstone and the higher sheerboard)

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Edited by Moony

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Moony,

 

You are thinking of using the "Hahn method" then for building.  You can build it upside down or rightside up.  If upside down, make your frames longer such that the ends will extend into the baseboard and glue them in place.  If you're doing bulkheads instead of frames, put some length and install into either slots or use wooden spacers screwed or glued to the baseboard. 

 

The stem and sternpost can be put in after the frames are up or jigged into place. 

 

I hope this helps.

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Thanks a lot Mark, this was very helpfull.

 

After furter looks into the book and the forum - I think I'll have to mix both technics. The front part to the bow is encloses and there is no need to built frames - but the after part is open and the formers can be seen - between the bilge stringer and the riser - so I will be forced to show them. But I have no idea about the measurements - the look quite heavy on the pictures from the museum's buildingyard workshop.

 

Tomorrow I'll do some further work on the drawings.

 

Yours

Moony

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:blush:  Sorry.  :blush:  But I have had to decide to put my cat to sleep at the vet - so I'm unable to do anything at the boat tonight.

Edited by Moony

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Tough call on your pet Mooney, our cat died a couple of years ago and if he had not died in his sleep that last night I was going to have to do what you did.

My condolences.

 

I will follow along on your boat.

 

Michael

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A short thanks to all of you!

 

Now it's getting crowded arround my workshoptable... starting to look like a cinema with all these chairs!  ;)

 

 

Thanks foryour intrest, answering & help,

Moony

Edited by Moony

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But back to topic - and to some good-feeling deflexion in my sad mood:

 

(As you see I made progress in reading Mr. Post's texts in the book.)

 

Howard I. Chapelle wrote that the whaler was built "with not above seven bolts the entire hull structure (...) excepting the small ones to secure the iron work." (Post, The Tancook Whaler p.20) and entirely constructed from local woods:

 

  • the posts were made from larch - using the lower trunk and roots
  • the keel was made from birch
  • the oiuter shoe was from beech or elm
  • the planking was a local pine "which was harder than any white pine I have ever seen".

So the biggest stock of wood I'll need is pine fore the palnking and larch for the stem and stern posts.

As I wrote here and in a book about modelbuilding I should use ash wood instead of oak - due to the finer graining - but it is done in 1/48 or scales of bigger reduction. 

  1. Do I have to scale the building materials down in my big scale?
  2. What kind of wood a good substitution for pine and lerch in 1/2inch scale?  
  3. And what kind of wood should be taken for the deck?

 

Thanks for your help & intrest,
 
Moony

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Edited by Moony

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Hello friends,

 

now I dealt with the idea of the bulhheads.

 

As the CWL in one layer parallel to the yards/baseboard I decided to errect the  single bulkhead orientated to this. So I cut the A3 plywood layers in two 125mm stripes. So I got to delivered edge as baseline - due to the fact that I wrecked three layers of ply wood while trying to cut them into 90mm stripes... they were  :huh:... I wasn't able to get them flat.  :angry:  :(

 

So I decided to redo and use the fabricatet edge as baseline - than I set two points 80mm above this edge and connectet them with my steelruler. 

 

So I got the CWL line on the board - and I hope I'll get all the same to all the bulkheads.

 

I don't think it's not very tricky sophisticated... it's the way of a less gifted and more carefull modelbuilder. 

 

Yours Moony

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Very cool build you have going on here Moony, I will have to follow along 

 

Best Regards,

Pete

 

Thanks a lot, Pete...

 

but am I on the right track to get a well done moulding by my decission to take this way?

 

Here my first scetch right into the plans - perhaps you can see what I mean... everything shoul be perpendicular but the drawings perspectiove forces me to draw it in a skew way. Sorry for this... 

 

And were do I have to cut the PoF-frames on the pink or the black line?

 

 

Yours

Moony

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Edited by Moony

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The board between the pink and black lines is the clamp.  It goes the length of the boat, holds the tops of the frames and is a support for the deck.  In the top view, at the orange line, you see the edge of the hull plank, then the end of the ribs (frames) and then the clamp.  I leave the frames long, then put in the clamp and cut the frames flush with the top of the clamp.  In this case it would be the black line.

 

Bob

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One very interesting detail I noted on your plans.  The scantling view in the Chappelle book shows ribs perpendicular to the keel, where your more detailed large scale plan shows ribs that look somewhat tangentially perpendicular to the gunwales; i.e. wider spacing at the keel than the gunwales and slightly different angles. (unless that's just photo distortion?)  

 

What rib arrangement will you go with?

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Thanks a lot, Bob, that's great help... I computed the panks will be 0.926mm thick and the frames 1.2mm - so everything is very fragile and brash in 1/24... it's more a working with vaneer than with wood.

Should I plank the hole hull on moulds and then lift it and fill the planking in afterwards? 

Yoours,

Moony

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Yes, Bob Marvin,

 

you are right - it's looks like... :o

 

But when I took a geometry set square I figure out... they were parallel in the drawing of D.W.Dillon (who redraw the Chapelle's drawing from the 1930th) and perdendicular to the waterline. So everything is easier and I could relax...

 

Yours

Moony 

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Thanks Bob - so it willbe the better idea to left the moulds as bulkheads inside and use the maroon-red board in the drawing as a backbone. Stiffing the bulkhads to eachother by adding woodstick-speaders between them. Certainly only where they were not to see.

 

But the formers seem to bee very fine and tiny to me... :o if I look on my scaled drawing. 

 

I got the idea to add lets call them "former-moulds". They will be bulkheads narrowed by the thicknesss of the former - due to preform the woodstrips to be set in the right form by water and an electric soldering iron. After They were dry and cold I would gue them into theyer place.

 

What do you think about this?

 

Or shoud I just don't think and plan too much - and just mak'ing a start?

 

Yours,

Moony

Edited by Moony

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Moony, it is everyone's dream that when they do something for the first time it will be a masterpiece.  But that never happens.  We all, even after years of modeling wonder, 'how do I do that?'.  So we do what we think is best and if it doesn't work out we take it apart and try again.  If you look at the other build logs you will see many ways for doing the same thing, but in the end they are all fine boats.  This is a hobby.  It needs to be fun or you won't continue.  So build the hull as you said.  It may turn out to be the way you build every boat from now on.

 

Bob

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Hello...

 

NOW I'm rant and rave at me due to the boat I "voted" to build. I took an example that is open... so you can see the inner details...

As I started to cut them out I' saw them as to be a bit thin and light... :huh:  

 

So I'll have to chanmge my plans because the poplar plywood is very flexible. and I decided to strenght the formers because I'm unable to bent 1mm oak veneer as I planed to do. The exact rigt 0.9mm thick white oak sprips got always broken...  :wacko:  :unsure:  

 

So I think I make a mockery on myself between all this wonderfull projects I like so much - and can measure at - but I want to :dancetl6: "fight through" :dancetl6: this project and not to get stuck... so I'll have to extemporise. 

 

I spare you the battlefield of dissipated time, wood and sweat (hot water to bent the veneer.)

 

 

 

This is the tricky way I 'll go - and below what doesn't work:

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Edited by Moony

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:angry:  It doesn't work!!!  :angry:


 


I tried to cut slots in the bulkheads to get the openings for the backbone - and the were broken...


 


I wrecked the hole thing. 


 


 


:blush:


Moony


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Edited by Moony

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Hello Moony, Upon looking at your frame layout, it looks as if you have the keel slots running with the grain wich could have caused them to split, perhaps try your layout against the wood grain, and go slowly on critical cuts

 

Best Regards,

Pete

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Pete's right about slow cuts, and careful fitting of the framing onto the keel piece.  Don't ever force the wood framing/bulkheads onto the keel.   At least I think that's what you're saying went wrong.   Is this plywood or single thickness wood?   Thin plywood won't (or shouldn't) split.

 

Any pictures of the wreckage?   Was the white oak veneer the problem?  

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