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Thats my life.....7 days a week in the shop for a minimum of 10 hours a day.  So I am gonna take two days off.  Normally we would head to the beach for a long weekend or something with the family.  But that is not an option during the apocalypse.   So two days just hanging around is the best option to recharge.   I am already feeling anxious like Im just wasting time.   I dont know what to do with myself.....but cant even step foot in the shop.   So its time to start a jigsaw puzzle while watching stupid movies.    Will watch the new Tom Hanks movie about WW2.   Supposed to be good.   

 

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On the 7th day Chuck should rest !   

 

Yea, I can empathize with the isolation, I can't stand being in my basement model shop either. And even tho I am near mountains, I still have no place to safely go.  Even eating take out is getting unappetizing.  

 

Get some rest, Chuck.   You deserve it.  (Admiral and I watched that movie couple days ago. It is good action movie)

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Enjoy your rest, well deserved.

 

Greyhound is indeed a good movie and at about 1 ½ hours way to short. I never watch movies twice but I watched this one a second time two days later. 

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Chuck, I never did understand you even back in the day at the ship model club meetings and now this.  You say you only work half days (10 hours) and expect sympathy?????   Puhlease.......

Kidding of course!   Have fun, enjoy, forget work for a couple days, you deserve it.

Allan

 

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Malcolm is one of the few professional ship model builders who actually earns a living from it. But it took him 53 months to build Agamemnon and for the price it was sold one can see it's not a path that will make one wealthy.

https://www.ft.com/content/bd64d87c-cd6c-11e8-8d0b-a6539b949662. The way to go would be to be the private ship model restorer for the Kreigsteins but I think that job is taken.

 

Looking forward to seeing updates of your Winchelsia Chuck. It's very Malcom-esque.

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Whenever shop time, boatyard time, or any other enjoyable activity starts to become too much of a chore and not enough of a pleasure, the only solution is to get away, drink a few beers, and think something, anything else.

 

Naps are good.

 

Martin

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6 hours ago, Chuck said:

You would never know that by how quickly they head out the door.

Chuck, I don't know whether to click the like button or not. 

I can understand it is hard to get inventory balanced, so you're not running out of parts constantly. 

Hope you really enjoyed your weekend. 

 

Cheers

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It was a nice break. Unfortunately you guys will be waiting longer for restocking. I had a not so pleasant development with my supply chain.  I have lost my guy who mills all my Boxwood, Cherry and Cedar.  
 

This is why you only see Basswood being used by MFGs in The USA.  Its impossible to get the quantities of better wood sheets from any place and must develop your own supply chain here for anything unusual.  So I am now forced to personally mill and thickness my own sheets as well as make parts.  
 

With the hundreds of sheets needed it will be a good while before kits are restocked. I need around 250 sheets of Cedar and Boxwood for example in various thicknesses to make just 6 longboat kits.  
 

So i am busy milling sheets as we speak.  Anyone know anybody who wants to make a few bucks milling sheets who has a good bandsaw?  On average I typically burn through about 200 - 400 sheets every month.  It depends on what needs to be made.
 

I will supply all the wood billets (Boxwood, Cherry and Cedar) and pay for milling and thicknessing services per board.  Contact me if you are interested via PM.  Northeast coast location is preferred. 
 

I really wish somebody would jump into this space and really miss Hobbymill!!!!

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That’s quite unfortunate, I’m sorry to hear it.


Is it simply too cost prohibitive? I was looking for some sheets to do a future scratch build and I can’t really find much (anything really) and I don’t have the tools (or really want to purchase them right now) to mill my own. Feel like I may be a little locked into kits for some time.

 

I assume this may have a significant impact on your windlass mini kit?

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My capstan kit.....no not really.  I actually have a dozen already made and ready to go.   I just havent had time to write the instructions so I can offer them yet.   I am spending all my time milling wood and making parts and rope.  I will get there.   But its gonna take time.   If I stop work in the factory to write for a few days then I would fall too far behind making stuff so its a delicate balance.

 

So if someone who has the tools wants to make a few extra bucks milling wood let me know.  It just takes so much time to do and also make kits and parts.   The tools needed to do milling of this kind of wood is expensive so start up costs are high.   For someone getting into the business of milling wood it is cost prohibitive.   To buy enough wood billets to mill is also very expensive.  For example I just received about $2000 worth of excellent quality Boxwood billets.   8/4 stock.  For anyone wanting to do this as a side business.....if you needed to also buy a bunch of Swiss Pear, Holly, Cherry and Cedar and Maple of good quality would cost around 12-15,000 to get started with a decent quantity.   Not to mention the cost of machines......and dust control.  And the space needed!!!

 

So I get it.  Its not for everyone.  For me its just 3 species so its not bad.   I can personally mill about 50 sheets per day finished accurately.  Its hard work.  So it will take a few weeks to restock with material to have enough around to make kits.   I have next to nothing left right now  because my wood guy didnt want to tell me and kind of strung me along until I had nothing left........ so it sucks right now, but once I get a decent stash it just needs to be maintained.   I would rather have someone else do this however.   But nobody wants to do this kind of work anymore.   Younger folks just dont have the desire or skills.   So the search continues.   

 

Otherwise I have to switch to readily available wood to make my stuff which I dont want to do.  Its why Model Shipways and Bluejacket only use Basswood.  You can get it pre milled easily.  The only stuff you can get pre milled easily is basswood, poplar, and maple.  Not really good wood for ship modelling.  I can get Boxwood from Europe pre milled but it would be twice my current cost.  So thats out as it would be too costly.  Nobody does this work in the states any more.  I am the only source for pre milled Cedar and places like Ocooch refuse to mill woods other than the typical stuff you see available not appropriate for ship modelling.   Its a real issue so I dont blame MS and Bluejacket for only using Basswood....its really the only option at these quantities needed.

 

Chuck

 

 

 

 

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Not good news on the milled wood, Chuck.   I wish I was in a position to help out but all my old equipment is long gone.    BTW, I have found cherry milled but the price and shipping isn't that cheap from Ocoohe.   Like everyone else, I miss Hobbymill and also Jason's wood.

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If you go to any average furniture joiner here abouts, they usually are able to do such work. I myself worked in such a workshop for 3 years. Everything is there: Huge table circular saw, band saw, milling machines, thickness sanders, and so on. We sometimes made nice building blocks for children out of wood, wich was left over from bigger projects. Usually the apprentice made that. Are there no such companys nearby, who are willing to do such work? 

You maybe should move to Europe Chuck, I would organise the milling for you :)

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18 hours ago, Beckmann said:

go to any average furniture joiner

A very quick google search brought up several furniture joiners in New Jersey (I think that is where Chuck is).  Perhaps someone that knows what to ask could contact them and find out if they are open to do the milling for Chuck, assuming Chuck approves of the idea.

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By the way, I just received 3 lovely antik etchings from E.W. Cooke. They were sent of from Manassas Virginia / USA on July 27. And arrived today. That is very fast shipping even in times before corona. The mail seems to be okay now.

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It's always nice to be missed and appreciated!

 

I didn't have a very good experience with furniture makers, but my experience was a long time ago and limited to just a single venture.  My guess is that it's a little more complex than just finding someone with equipment.  Most of their equipment is larger so there are safety issues and they are used to thinking that 1/16" or 1/32" is very accurate.  Also in my case there was a lot of waste.  Still a good idea to help out source some of the work.

 

When I was milling, the majority of my time (up to 70%) was taken up by the sanding and dimensioning.  After band sawing, I used the equivalent of a Jet 16-32 drum sander with a 3/4" carrier board made from baltic birch.  I could run 3-4  3"x24" sheets through at a time, but you had to hold down the sheets on both sides of the drum to keep them from moving.  Normally took about six passes and due to the cantilever design of the sander the sheets had to be rotated after each pass.  My sander was fairly parallel to the bed but there was still a variance of about .010" over the 16" span.  I rotated them around on the board, end over end, and of course flipping to get both sides. Took continuous measurements at each end and middle of every sheet during the rotation process.  It was a slow, dusty, and noisy job.  Seems like that 16"x36" piece of plywood never got lighter as the day wore on.

 

I would shoot for around +.040" oversize resawing on the bandsaw, so most of the time you're not taking off that much stock.  Used 120x sandpaper exclusively.  Guess I could have gone with 100x and that would have saved some time.

 

I guess if I were to do it again I would look to automate and speed up the sanding process.  Things like adding rollers to hold sheets in place on the conveyor bed, faster through speed conveyor, and an automatic feeder and collection system so that you could load a stack of sheets off of the bandsaw.  Multiple drum heads would help too.  Obviously this would add to the equipment cost and space requirements.

 

In any case just my 2 cents.

 

Jeff Hayes  aka  HobbyMill

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I have actually found a few places that will do it.  But it will take a lot of time to get things rolling.  In the meanwhile I am doing it myself.   As I write this actually.  One company I have found makes architectural moldings.  They can load a 13 foot board  two inches thick and out of the other end comes ten milled pieces 1/8" thick or more.    From here they are passed through industrial sanders to be finished down to 1/16" thick.  Thats the thinnest most will do.  So I would take them down more for boards thinner than that.   Pricing is good but of course the bad part is I have to order 7,500 bucks at a time as a minimum.  They will mill anything.....If they dont have it I can supply it.   This is just one company I am talking to.   But 7 large for each order is a bit much for me.   But the price per sheet is very good.  I am making progress however.

 

Chuck

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I have also just found someone local again who will be starting tomorrow and just doing milling for me.   So things should be getting back to normal soon I hope.....But I just wanted to give you guys a heads up and ask for a bit of patience as I work through the training process and get mybacklog squared away.

 

Chuck

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I hope that readers won’t mind my hijacking Chuck’s topic with a short wood story (somewhat relevant). 

 

A side benefit to the “wood game” is that you sometimes have some unforgettable experiences.  About 45 years ago while working at my first post Navy job in the backwoods Ohio town of Marietta, my boss, a woodworking hobbyist announced that he had located a source for cherry lumber.  He and I drove out to a “woodpecker” sawmill back in the hills outside of town and I bought 50 board feet of rough sawn, 1 inch cherry lumber at 35 cents per board foot.  I don’t remember how I justified this major expense to my young wife whose father didn’t know which end of a hammer to use.

 

After air drying the wood I had to get it planed into dimensioned lumber.  Someone at work told me about a guy in Lowell, Ohio nearby who owned a planing mill, so one Saturday I loaded up my wood and drove there.  The population of Lowell was then less than 1000 so I quickly found his place, a large one story barn like building that had seen better days.  The proprietor of this place was a really old guy, at least he seemed old to me, wearing the usual bib overalls (overhauls in Southern Ohio jargon).  After considerable grumbling he agreed to plane my wood.  

 

He started up a huge electric motor that started an overhead shaft turning.  Along this shaft was a series of wooden pulleys, each pulley driving a wide, flat leather belt.  Each belt capable of driving a different machine.  His transmission system was a wooden stick that he used with considerable manual dexterity to flip the required belt onto the pulley to start the required machine, a pre OSHA setup).  About ten minutes later my lumber was planed.  I probably paid him about $5.00 to plane the whole lot.

 

Unfortunately, I doubt if guys like this still exist, and if they do they’re probably in backwoods places like Southeastern, Ohio.  As for my lumber, some of it was made into ship model cases, or a display case for my model soldiers. When I accepted a new job in Duluth, MN the remaining lumber went with me.  I lately offered some of it to an acquaintance but then winter snowed in my shop and now that we’re social distancing, my wife doesn’t want anyone coming into the house.  Maybe I’ll live long enough to use it up.

 

Roger

 

 

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Hey Chuck, what's going on over there? My order arrived today.  That's only 19 days since shipping! Even in non-Covid times I expect three weeks and recent orders from the US have taken ,ore like six weeks ! Amazing. Now I can start building again.

 

Thanks,

 

John

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