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druxey

Greenwich Hospital barge of 1832 by druxey - FINISHED - 1:48 scale

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Alan G: The original timber used was probably larch. A Royal barge draught of 1823 (ZAZ7154) has the notation "To be built of Larch, or other light and durable wood."

 

And yes, I've used trompe l'oeil techniques before, both on baseboards as well as theatrical and film furniture and sets. 

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And yes, I've used trompe l'oeil techniques before, both on baseboards as well as theatrical and film furniture and sets.

 

That explains a lot, Druxey

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Great idea using the plug to form the shape, I would have been trying to do it on the actual hull, one to remember

Lovely work druxey!!!!!!!!

Yes, me too.  She's beautiful.

 

Bob

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The first of the two coach sides is now in the process of being constructed. These are built up in the same way as the fore and aft ends of the coach. As there is a slight curve to the sides, allowance is made for some flex between each of the three lights.

 

Toni: to answer your question, I'm delaying a final judgement on the degree of reflectivity of the gold until the model nears completion. Also, the photographs don't really give the effect of the actual appearance to the eye.

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Lovely, lovely work, Druxey.  

 

For some reason, I do not use rubber bands, perhaps because the box I had was so old that they broke whenever I stretched them.  I have forgotten how useful they can be.  Thanks for the reminder.

 

Photography is often too discerning of our errors and unrepresentative of the actual visual effect, especially on reflective surfaces, but what would we do without it?

 

Larch was a commonly used wood on American ships.  The shipyard name for this here was hackmatack, more properly tamarack, the same as European larch - about 75% the strength of white oak.  Thank you, Bill C.

 

Ed

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Thanks once more for the likes and comments, everyone.

 

I had to re-do the side of the coach. I found that I had cut the lights to the wrong depth. In addition, the lights were uneven in width. So, a second round.

 

When dealing with tiny pieces, I've found it easiest to leave them over-length to glue them on (top photo). I then use a chisel to cut the pieces to exact length. The top and bottom pieces of the panel frame were cut a little overlength, then sanded using a sanding stick to trim them to exact dimension (second photo). 

 

The inner side of the piece has had card strips glued on to leave channels for the glazing (third photo). In this case I shall be using mica. This is a naturally occurring mineral that is fairly transparent. It can be peeled into very thin layers and cuts easily. The pieces will be slid into place from above before the roof is installed. The cutaway at the bottom of the side is because the hull curves inward here and this allows for the changing interior contour.

 

The last photo shows the work to this point. Next will be the inside panelling and the other side piece.

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Oh boy! Hey fellas, over here! Come and see! Druxey had a re-do!!!

 

Seriously though Druxey, it's very re-assuring to know that even the Demi-gods have re-dos. :)

 

Outstanding work all round, Sir.

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Learner: I didn't miss the panels: I simply took the photos while the sides were in the process of being built up!

 

Grant: Yes, it's true. Even professionals have to re-do things. Errare humanum est and all that.

 

Thanks for looking in, everyone.

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Thanks for dropping by, everyone.

 

The outer sides of the coach have been completed and gilded. The coach is only test-fitted together at present. I'm now in the process of panelling the inner sides and refining the fit of the corners of the coach. The latter needs particular care: take too much material off a corner and....

 

The door hardware has been added. The door knobs are of brass wire whose ends have been melted. If done correctly, the ends of the wire will form a small spherical ball. The 'bronze' hinges are pieces of bamboo treenail and paper, acrylic painted.

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Incredible work as usual druxey. It looks like your getting close! I liked your idea about the mica and may use it on my build. I have some large pieces in my shop but never thought about using it for a model. Split thin enough, it is clear as glass. Great idea!

 

Glenn

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Thanks, gentlemen.

 

Joel: The access scuttle was, I believe, for bailing. There were lockers beneath the coach seating. 

 

Glenn: Mica was traditionally used on many contemporary models so, nothing new under the sun!

 

Paul: The hinges are simple to make. Cut a strip of paper whose width is the height of the hinge leaf. Lay it down on a flat surface and place a length of 'pin' of suitable diameter across it at right angles. Glue the strip for a little way on one side of the 'pin' and fold over. Press the paper strip snugly against the pin. Let this dry. Paint the assembly a suitable color. Trim the pin and leaves to length and install.

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Beautiful work again druxey, any chance of a little "how to" on the hinges

Hi Paul

Alternative you can also make working hinges

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/12842-sms-danzig-1851-by-gerhardvienna-radio-150-scale/?p=393467

with a little bit of soldering

 

Hello druxey

 

Perfect work, incredible, that is done in such shotr time!

 

Regards

Gerhard

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And... the coach sides and ends have been completed, the 'glass' installed and the four sides permanently assembled. After some fien adjustment, the corners came together quite nicely. For the statisticians among us, there were 53 separate parts required just for the outer surfaces of one coach side alone! Next, the coach roof.

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thanks Druxey, looking awesome again, where does one get "mica"

cheers Gerhard for the link, I made working hinges on my lower hatches like yours but I think druxeys will be more in keeping for the doors on the upper deck around the captains cabin area

Edited by paulsutcliffe

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thanks Druxey, looking awesome again, where does one get "mica"

cheers Gerhard for the link, I made working hinges on my lower hatches like yours but I think druxeys will be more in keeping for the doors on the upper deck around the captains cabin area

Try 'isinglass mica'.  It was used before glass was available in large sheets, also for carriage windows and stoves.

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