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Hello.  I'm leaning towards building the Blue Jacket kit of the schooner Atlantic, and hope someone can shed some light on something I found curious. One website below shows an obviously professional build, perhaps of the same kit, and the second (scroll further down the page) has an artist's rendering of the reconstruction of the original.  On both, the underwater part of the hull is dark green.  Why is that, when the antifouling was red?   

 

I think the green color is striking below the black, so if there's any justification for painting it as such, that's the way I'd go.

 

Thanks

Art

 

http://lannangallery.com/schooners-sloops/cased-model-of-the-schooner-atlantic

 

http://www.superyachtnews.com/fleet/11903/reconstruction_of_legendary_superyacht_schooner_atlantic.html

 

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Right, I noticed that too, but the hull in the model is clearly green; there's no way that the color in such a high-resolution photo could be so far off.  On the other page, I was referring to the artist's rendition below the photograph showing the red antifouling.  It's also green in that image.

 

Art

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Art

 

My point was that while the cased model and artist's rendering were green, the full scale reproduction vessel, and the written intent of the cased model makers was red below the waterline.

 

So it seems to me like red would be the better choice .

 

But as is often said on this forum, "you're the captain".

 

Richard

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Interesting you should reply, Mark - I found your photos of this build elsewhere on this forum and they're what got me excited about the prospect of working with this kit.  Your detail and execution is superb.  Thanks for sharing.

 

I have an email out to the naval architectural firm that designed the reconstructed Atlantic to inquire as to the hull color in their rendering.  Will advise what they say.

 

Art

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I would like to see some research on the history of bottom or antifouling paint. I am building a late 1800's yacht and taking a total guess on what the bottom paint is. I went with a red oxide color. But it makes me wonder about the history and the timeline of availability of specialized bottom paint. At some point in the past the green color of copper based coatings would have come in, but at what point did the commercial paint industry mature to the point where it could market such specialty paints to the boating world? And before the iron oxide paint, were they all just using "White Stuff"? Tallow and grease and concoctions of tar? The vessel I am building is under 40' and I can not imagine the owners having the wherewithal to copper. But copper was certainly still in the greater picture in the second half of the nineteenth century, if on the way out.

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