Jump to content
probablynot

Silhouet [finished] by probablynot - Constructo - 1/60 - Dutch 'tjalk' river cargo boat

Recommended Posts

sorry to hear of your dilemma Brian.   I hope things get better for you.   my admiral loves to watch those fixer-upper shows on TV........I see some of the crap people have to put up with.  enough to make ya want to run the other way.   did it have anything to do with the leakage in the first place?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the days when I worked in construction contract management, they called this a change order. Change orders almost always cost dearly. Many contractors make a lot of money from change orders. All it takes is a deviation from original plans and you now have a change order.

I am hoping everything works out well for you, Brian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Problem's still unresolved.  I've challenged the conservatory-builders, told them they're in breach of their contract etc, and laid a whole lot of other complaints/problems at their doorstep, but they're not being helpful.  Yet.

I keep escalating the correspondence.  Gradually.  Might have to challenge them to cancel the contract and reinstate the previously-existing conservatory they trashed in order to build the new one.  I don't want to do that.  Obviously.  I just want them to get on with it and build our new conservatory!

It's one of those situations where the one who gives in first loses.

I'm not going to lose!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

What is a normal procedure in England when the contract is breached? Here we can ask a judge to rule on it. Often people have a legal insurance which takes all the work out of hand so you don't need to find a lawyer, and all the other things. You could ask a lawyer to advise you on the matter ...

If it takes to long I would ask legal advise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ever since the conservatory builders knocked down our old conservatory (and so far, failed to put up the new one) I've been making occasional brave forays across the building site to get to the workshop.
It hasn't felt as though I've been making much progress with this build recently.  But this afternoon I suddenly realised I've all but finished doing the deck fittings.  The next step will involve adding the masts and rigging.

I said I've 'all but finished'.  There are still a few eye-plus-block combos to be made and fitted.  These involve wrapping copper wire around the blocks and using it to attach them to eye pins (for fixing to the deck and/or cabin tops).  Constructo's copper wire is 0.2mm diameter (about 1/128"), so scaled-up it would represent a half-inch diameter steel bar wrapped around a 12-inch long pulley block.
Probably OK, if the Silhouet really was equipped bows-to-stern with foot-long pulley blocks (5mm on the model).  I have my doubts about this, and I'm wondering whether to substitute 3mm blocks (about 7½ inches).  But if I do, I'd still have to use that 0.2mm diameter copper wire to fix them to the eye pins.  It's not easy to work with; it kinks and breaks easily, and it's very hard to achieve a neat winding-together of the ends.
If I stick with the 5mm blocks, maybe I could use heavier copper wire?  I've got some 0.4mm wire on order, but it won't arrive before the New Year.

I'm still mulling this question over in my mind.  All help and opinions will be gratefully received.

Anyway, I've meanwhile been working on the plinth the model will be standing on.  You can see it under construction in the background of my first photo here.  The Constructo kit includes a sapele-veneered MDF slab for this, and I was supposed to finish off the edging with thin strips of basswood and sapele.  Instead I'm edging it with strips of keruing recovered from an old shelf unit, planed and routed to form a neat concave moulding.  After Christmas I'll turn the keel support posts from a piece of the same keruing.

 

post-25-0-83527800-1482524122_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-73868900-1482524139_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-76143600-1482524156_thumb.jpg

Which reminds me:
A Happy Christmas to everyone who's visited my build log in 2016!  Thank you so much for your support, for your 'likes', for your comments, your help and your advice.
Or if you just looked in, thanks for not drinking too much of my beer!
And may 2017 be far, far less horrible than the portents are indicating ...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stand is now completed and there are pins (through the mounting columns and into the keel) to hold the boat to it.

However, I haven't glued the pins - I think I might need to push the boat further back on the stand once I've got masts and rigging (and possibly sails) in place.

 

post-25-0-71920300-1483204774_thumb.jpg

My first task for 2017 will be to get the two masts shaped and stepped; then I can start on the rigging.

Happy New Year, everyone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, everyone, for the nice comments and New Year wishes.

 

When I ventured out to the workshop this evening, the temperature inside was 0°C!  Took a good half hour with the fan heater running full blast to get the environment up to a bearable level!

 

I've been turning my masts, using 8mm and 6mm dowel.  Fascinating mast shape - not something I would have expected.  But there again, the whole concept of the Dutch Tjalk strikes me as quirky.  That inward-bent freeboard.  The curious curved gaff that some of them have.  The leeboards.

But 'quirky' doesn't mean unattractive.  I'd have bought one, happily, if I'd had a few hundred pounds to spare a few years after WW2 when I was in my early teens!

 

Anyway, here are the results of my evening's work:

 

post-25-0-20204900-1483390608_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

I think there's a bit more sandpapering to do.  I spent more time after my woodturning session sharpening the chisels I was using.  Perhaps I ought to have done that before I did the woodturning ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Narrowboats are quirky, tjalks are not :)

 

You made them more quirky than needed: the ring on the boom is in ral life an iron band, as is the toone on the mast.

The lower one is a thickening of the mast, in order to have the stays and shrouds a fixing poiint.

 

Oe of the 'quirky' things (at least, if i understand correctly what you label quirky;) ) you left out: the lower end of these masts is square.

 

Jan

post-176-0-03668200-1483391802.jpg

post-176-0-24595600-1483391813.jpg

Edited by amateur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Jan. Now that you point it out, it's obvious! I'll have to see what I can do to add wood to the bases of the masts and square them between those supports.

 

I wasn't being rude when i called the tjalks 'quirky'. They're lovely boats! I was using the word to mean 'delightfully different'!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Brian and a happy New Year to you and the family.

Finally caught up with your build after a too long an absence.

Your delightfully different tjalk is really looking very lovely.  Yep, all those Dutch boats and ships look hmmmm, delightfully different, that's why I like them.  Isn't it great to have Jan as your mentor steering you in the right direction.  He has been a great help to me as well with my VOC ship.

 

Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the good wishes, Piet.     And yes, you're right - Jan's pictures and guidance are being extremely helpful to me with this model.

 

So I've squared off the bases of the masts now, and added some detail at the mainmast head.  There's still a bit more work to be done with the mizenmast - that one is only dry-fitted right now.

 

I seem to be making slow progress with this build.  That's partly because there's still a messy building site between my back door and the workshop, while I wait for the builders to resolve the drainage problem with the local authorities, but that's not the only reason.  Am I taking more care with the detail?  Or am I just getting old?

 

post-25-0-66347700-1484152912_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-32586000-1484152930_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-01760800-1484152951_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the glasses on the shelf I would say you're getting old, looking at your avatar it is rather contrary. Young or old, you are doing a marvelous job on her!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carl, the glasses are all different strengths, and they come into use depending on how close I want to get my eyes to the work!
Before I had my cataracts sorted out, my myopia (short sightedness) was so awful that my eyes came into focus at a distance of about 12cm.  I needed heavy concave glasses to see normally, but for close-up modeling work I just took them off.  Now, however, I've got ordinary vision.  I can read car number plates at 45 metres, no problem, but I need specs to focus below about 90cm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still making progress.  I'm trying to discipline myself into having at least a half-hour session out in the shipyard every day.  And I'm more or less keeping to that, although sometimes the work has to be on various bits of my beloved Admiral's jewelry instead of on the Silhouet.  You'll know what I mean - things like repairs to broken bracelet links, or replacement 'lobster claw' catches if her long fingernails prevent her from operating the ones that came with the bracelet...

 

However, I have been managing to work on the ship too.

 

Hull work is pretty well complete, except for a couple of lifebelts (still being painted) and a few places where some dabs of touch-up paint are needed.  The masts are glued into place.  The anchor has been painted and mounted.  The spars (2 gaffs and 3 booms) are almost ready (still waiting for some blocks to be attached, but that won't take long).

 

So now it's the standing rigging.  And I've started on that too.

 

post-25-0-95848000-1484862584_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-82618900-1484862604_thumb.jpg

 

I was starting to curse Constructo for not telling me where all the rigging should go, but then I remembered that there was another big plan-sheet that I hadn't bothered to unfold yet!  I took a quick look at it, and yippee, everything's clear now!  Well, clear-ish ...

 

PS:   Oh, and I meant to mention, I've attached the 'Silhouet' name transfers at the bows, and some (obviously highly significant) numbers and letters at the stern.   When I tried to do the same with my 'Enterprise' build some while back, I had had no experience of those slide-off transfers and I made a right mess of it!  This time, though, I knew I had to be ultra-careful, and it worked fine!

Edited by probablynot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

I just reviewed this build log and must say you are putting together a truly impressive model.  I've also learned a new term today.  I was wondering what that paddle hanging off the side of the ship was called and learned about Leeboards.

 

I may have missed it previously but are you planning on installing sails?

Edited by Worldway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for looking in, Derek, and for the generous comments.

 

Yes, the model's going to have sails. I'm still trying to decide whether to use the (rather pristine, evenly woven) fabric that came with the kit, or to look for something with a bit more character.

Edited by probablynot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She looks great!

About the sails, the flat bottom ships in those days carried mostly brown sails, or at least in a rather Tan stile.

If you search on Google for the words "tjalk silhouette" there is a field full of pictures from those ships, most of them have brown sails.

As a young boy, my parents did have a small flat bottom boat, and i have sailed in that for many years. It had also very tan coulored sails.

Maybe this help with your sails making?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this could be a reference
 for the very off white Carls mentions. Rather common colour for the non-working boat version of these ships.

With respect to the structure of the sails: most of them are synthetic now-adays, so almost woithout structure, but the Original ones tend to be very evenly, very fine-woven cloth. Thin, and relatively supple. So you should aim for a very thin, very evenly woven material.

 

Jan

post-176-0-57528500-1484996054_thumb.jpg

Edited by amateur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...