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Probably every modeller wants to build a model in the Navy Board style. In 2004 I started to model the American privateer Oliver Cromwell in 1/48 ( original built in 1776). Model is built on drawing from Harold Hahn's book "Ships of the American Revolution and their models". The model is not completed at this time.

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Now I want to continue working. I do not like the old decor. Now I have learned to do a lot better. I started to model head figure. This is the Roman goddess Juno (the first name of the vessel). This is only a sketch, without detailing.

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Probably every modeller wants to build a model in the Navy Board style. In 2004 I started to model the American privateer Oliver Cromwell in 1/48 ( original built in 1776). Model is built on drawing from Harold Hahn's book "Ships of the American Revolution and their models". The model is not completed at this time.

 

 

Igor,

 

your "Oliver Cromwell" is an outstanding beauty in shipwright performance and handcraft work. Love those lines ! Beautiful Photos as well

The wonderful head figure (godess Juno) does her well deserved justice

 

Nils

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Hi Igor,

 

i presume you would be intending to start your "Oliver Cromwell" model as a brand new project again under the topic 

Build Logs for SCRATCH SHIP MODEL PROJECTS

in that case you would have to follow the guide lines for the project introduction, giving the main head data. See basic topic

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/forum/47-questionsinstructions-on-how-to-use-and-post-to-this-forumsite-problems-or-suggestions/

 

it also be giving an instruction how to download (your log "head figure for Oliver Cromwell") a complete Log and paste it into the new created project under the introduction name heading you would be choosing

 

Nils

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I finished production of Juno head figure for model Oliver Cromwell in scale of 1:48 from boxtree.

 

Technological chain of next - 3D model, then CNC milling, then hand finishing.

 

First time I tried 4-axis milling. It was harder than I thought, but I coped :)

 

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Historian John Millar writes about the origins of the Oliver Cromwell, in his "Early American ships", p. 150:

 

'The late [Historian] Marion Brewington suggested that she had previously been a Philadelphia merchant ship called "Juno", while [author] V.R. Grimwood suggests that she was formerly a Rhode Island ship by the name of "Ye Terrible Creature". The figurehead of the lady could represent either of those former names, the latter being of course the first owner's wife, a joke entirely in keeping with the humor of the colonial period. Our own opinions, and it is no more than that, is that she was built in Providence about 1774. At the end of 1776, the Narragansett bay was occupied by a powerful British garrison and fleet at Newport which would have made it difficult to sail her in or out of Providence, so she was transferred to Philadelphia ownership and renamed "Oliver Cromwell" at that time.'

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