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Proxxon Micromot DB 250 MICRO Woodturning Lathe


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Hi Folks,

 

So I am totally stuck on my build at the moment, I have overcome many hurdles of a first build but I am stuck with the shaping of the mast. I just cant seem to shape to any sort of standard using hand tools and it has become a source of great frustration.

 

I am looking in to buying the DB250 Lathe by Proxxon but I am concerned that I will spend the money and then realise that the mast is to long for the lathe. 

 

If there are any owners of the DB 250 that could share its limitations or even convince me it is worth spending out on I would be very appreciative.

 

Thanks in advance

 

Marc

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Hi Mark.

Yes you are correct the any masts is way to long for the lathe.

I own a lathe but prefer to shape it by hand. Planning first . Then sanding in a pillar drill. (Modified with hole in baseplate and through bench.)

I find that a long thin mast flexes in a lathe even the stock centrepoint being used and with very sharp tooling.

The wood plane is a 14 inch so has little or no level problems. First square the masts. To the right tapper Then octagon 8 sides. Then Hexadecagon 16 sides. This leaves very little sanding.

That's my method. I know it's a lot of work but results are great.

 

Regards Antony.

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Hi Holty, I am a Proxxon dealer in the US and a sponsor of the NRG and this Forum. The DB 250 has a hole which goes all the way through it for longer dowels to go through when turning. It is held by a collet which also has a hole through it. This allows for holding the piece so as not to break it with too much side pressure from the chisel. I can provide you with a picture if you need to see how it looks.

No worries,

 

John

 

http://www.proxxontoolsdiscount.comm

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The key to making masts on a lathe, at least for myself, is to use a support for the material that follows the tool head. I do not know if this is possible with the Proxxon.

 

The Proxxon could be used for freehand turning like you would do with a drill, as long as the masting stock will fit through the hole as John mentioned.

Edited by GuntherMT
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I use the DB250 and have found a way to support long pieces that works for me.

I remove all the components on the tail stock.  The dowel slips through the head stock and then through the tail stock. I move the tail stock as close to the head stock as necessary to provide rigid support for the dowel.

At first i used a piece of foam around the dowel in the tail stock to keep it from vibrating.  That worked ok but the foam would eventually work its way out requiring me to stop work to re set it.  Next I tried a piece of dowel that would fit securely in the tail piece. I drilled a hole through the center of the jig/dowel just a bit larger than the work piece (mast).  I fit the jig dowel into the tail stock and fixed it with the locking screw provided.  This worked well.  I could slide the tail stock to the optimum distance to provide a rigid work piece (no sag or vibrating).  At first I worried that their might be burning from the friction of wood spinning against wood but that never happened.  If it did I would remake the jig from a smooth plastic. this jig is part of my lathe tool box and has been reused multiple times.

 

Also, the piece of dowel that sticks out of the feed end of the head stock can whip around if not supported.  A piece of foam there kept it steady. I show all of this in my Syren build where I was working on belaying pins.

 

Richard.

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Good idea Richard. Oddly, I've had several discussions with clients concerning this very subject yesterday. Most of our discussions centered on using an extension base for the lathe bed (which I provide), allowing for longer pieces of wood to be turned by allowing the excess to protrude through the hole in the motor case and attach to the tail stock. This can be a very versatile tool.

John

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I use the DB250 and have found a way to support long pieces that works for me.

I remove all the components on the tail stock.  The dowel slips through the head stock and then through the tail stock. I move the tail stock as close to the head stock as necessary to provide rigid support for the dowel.

At first i used a piece of foam around the dowel in the tail stock to keep it from vibrating.  That worked ok but the foam would eventually work its way out requiring me to stop work to re set it.  Next I tried a piece of dowel that would fit securely in the tail piece. I drilled a hole through the center of the jig/dowel just a bit larger than the work piece (mast).  I fit the jig dowel into the tail stock and fixed it with the locking screw provided.  This worked well.  I could slide the tail stock to the optimum distance to provide a rigid work piece (no sag or vibrating).  At first I worried that their might be burning from the friction of wood spinning against wood but that never happened.  If it did I would remake the jig from a smooth plastic. this jig is part of my lathe tool box and has been reused multiple times.

 

Also, the piece of dowel that sticks out of the feed end of the head stock can whip around if not supported.  A piece of foam there kept it steady. I show all of this in my Syren build where I was working on belaying pins.

 

Richard.

Thanks for this Richard, I will have to have a look at your Syren, I must say I do like the look of that kit

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Hi Holty

 

As Richard explains (above) the easy way to turn long masts is to take the spindle out of the tail stock and use it as a steady (making sure to support the overhang to stop the mast whipping).

 

I turned the 5 foot long mast for my Endeavour on a lathe having a 18 inch between centres. See Photo

 

post-17220-0-31312100-1463775697_thumb.jpg

 

The bush in the tail stock isn't visible in the photo but the anti whipping support is (its on the right)

 

You can see more details in my Endeavour build log.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Marc

 

If you are still considering a small wood lathe you might want to look at the Axminster Tools site. They sell the proxxon but it gets mixed reviews. In particular at 150w its fairly low on power.

 

The machine below is 350w and generally gets consistently better reviews for little more cash.

501245_xl.jpg
 
Edited by KeithAug
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