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Making Shackles my way…


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Hi all.

In my last model (is coming soon) I've been challenged to make some more metal work.

So I decided among others to deal also with the shackles. You know, the nautical item shaped as the Greek alphabetical character "Ω”...

I didn't want to spoil my lazy way of making models, so I made relatively reasoning...post-617-0-75815400-1464881427.gif

Perhaps someone has also found an "easy" way to make shackles but I'm happy with my way.

Consider, I managed to make 12 pieces in 40 minutes, with minimal failure...and there are over 30 shackles in my model.

Just give me a few days time, to set up a presentation.

 

Thx

 

post-617-0-10585000-1464881737.jpg  The ruler is in cm.

 

 

post-617-0-49893700-1464882311.jpg

post-617-0-31528200-1464882332.jpg

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Hi Thanasis,

 

those  tackle pics, says it all...... wow !

clean precise work, I love it, how did you do the fill- inforcement in the stropp eyes ? is it anealed u-profile ?

 

Nils

 

Current builds

Steamship Ergenstrasse

Completed

"Mississippi Lady"  sternwheel steamer 1:30 kit build fun boat as Xmas present

"Zeesboot"  heritage wooden fishing small craft around 1870, POB  clinker scratch build scale 1:24

Pilot Schooner # 5 ELBE

Chebec "Eagle of Algier" 1753--scale 1:48-POB-(scratchbuild) 

"SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" four stacker passenger liner of 1897, 1:144 (scratchbuild)
"HMS Pegasus" , 16 gun sloop, Swan-Class 1776-1777 scale 1:64 from Amati plan  (scratch build)Pilot schooner #5 Elbe

"Pamir" 4-mast barque, P-liner, 1:96  (scratchbuild)

"Gorch Fock 2" German Navy cadet training 3-mast barque, 1:95 (scratchbuild) 

"Heinrich Kayser" heritage Merchant Steamship, 1:96 (scratchbuild) 

"Bohuslän" , heritage ,live Swedish museum passenger steamer (Billings kit), 1:50 

"Lorbas", river tug, steam driven for RC, fictive design (scratchbuild), scale appr. 1:32

under restoration / restoration finished 

"Hjejlen" steam paddlewheeler, 1861, Billings Boats rare old kit, scale 1:50

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Very nice rigging.  Well done.

 

Bob

Every build is a learning experience.

 

Current build:  SS_ Mariefred

 

Completed builds:  US Coast Guard Pequot   Friendship-sloop,  Schooner Lettie-G.-Howard,   Spray,   Grand-Banks-dory

                                                a gaff rigged yawl,  HOGA (YT-146),  Int'l Dragon Class II,   Two Edwardian Launches 

 

In the Gallery:   Catboat,   International-Dragon-Class,   Spray

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Those look really good, I am looking forward to seeing your full presentation.

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Thank you all.

Nils, assuming that you're referring to thimbles, it might be another presentation for this...post-617-0-05007200-1464890552.gif

Thx

 

post-617-0-27810800-1464890479.jpg The ruler in in cm.

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Thanks Thanasis,

 

smart solution there   ;)

 

Nils

 

Current builds

Steamship Ergenstrasse

Completed

"Mississippi Lady"  sternwheel steamer 1:30 kit build fun boat as Xmas present

"Zeesboot"  heritage wooden fishing small craft around 1870, POB  clinker scratch build scale 1:24

Pilot Schooner # 5 ELBE

Chebec "Eagle of Algier" 1753--scale 1:48-POB-(scratchbuild) 

"SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" four stacker passenger liner of 1897, 1:144 (scratchbuild)
"HMS Pegasus" , 16 gun sloop, Swan-Class 1776-1777 scale 1:64 from Amati plan  (scratch build)Pilot schooner #5 Elbe

"Pamir" 4-mast barque, P-liner, 1:96  (scratchbuild)

"Gorch Fock 2" German Navy cadet training 3-mast barque, 1:95 (scratchbuild) 

"Heinrich Kayser" heritage Merchant Steamship, 1:96 (scratchbuild) 

"Bohuslän" , heritage ,live Swedish museum passenger steamer (Billings kit), 1:50 

"Lorbas", river tug, steam driven for RC, fictive design (scratchbuild), scale appr. 1:32

under restoration / restoration finished 

"Hjejlen" steam paddlewheeler, 1861, Billings Boats rare old kit, scale 1:50

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Most of my current ship models are being built to 1:87 scale ( yeah, HO scale, 3.5mm= 1Foot ), to fill a harbor scene on a set of modules I take to local train shows. In that scale, the shackles pictured would measure 81/2" to 9" dia.

I use a single strand of picture hanging wire, to make my shackles which measure about 1.5 mm, or, about 4".

The thimbles :o:D:piratebo5: I have got to try those, using the same wire !!!!!

I use surgical suture for the standing rigging, and sewing thread for the running rigging. I work a very fine needle a short distance up from a loop, then, using a needle threader, pull the end of suture/thread into the eye of the needle and then pull the needle up and through the body of the line, forming a seized, or spliced eye. If I were working to a larger scale, I might actually try splicing instead. In the case of a block, or dead-eye going in the loop, it is inserted and the loop tightened around it. The loops are locked in place with a drop of "super glue".

Edited by sumpter250
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Ok here we go.

Tools you will need.

The basics in your workshop but I consider also as necessary, what is shown in the below photo.

A heavy duty pliers, with some flat space (3-4 mm / 0.15748’’) at the edges of its nose.

A haemostatic pliers with as much can be narrow nose. If you can’t find this kind of pliers, you can use instead a strong self closing tweezers.

Your round nose pliers (small and larger).

One part of a small hinge, with the pivot.

Drills bits at 0,50 mm diameter.

Soft wire at 0,73 -0,75 mm in diameter (I think is suitable for the 1:24- 1:26 scale of my models). I used those in photo ear piercing nails, finding them suitable in dimensions and convenient in color (no need to paint them) …

And finally an old PC processor...post-617-0-93947000-1465028170.gif post-617-0-26194800-1465028187.gif

 

post-617-0-26408100-1465028226.jpg

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Before you start you need to make some modifications, as below.

 

a.Take the haemostatic pliers and if it’s necessary trim down (about to 4mm/ 0.15748 ‘’) one part of its nose. Then, making first a scratch mark on the surface of the same part, make a hole at 0.50 mm. You might need some drill bits here…

post-617-0-87604500-1465028327.jpg

 

b.Take the part of the hinge and modify it as in photo. Namely, remove the pivot cut off the inner support and bring down the other support so that the pivot can be as close to the main part of the hinge.

post-617-0-09691600-1465028373.jpg

 

c.Take the heavy duty pliers and place pieces of masking tape on both parts of its nose, leaving a flat space about 2mm/ 0.0787402’’.

post-617-0-62349700-1465028406.jpg

 

That’s all for now mates, thank you and stay tuned…

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Ok, let’s set a Shackles producing line….

You may choose your way for each of the following stages but I’m showing what I do…

 

-Take a piece of paper and draw two lines at the total length that a shackle should has to be, depending on the scale you work. I work at 1:24-1:26 scale so I found suitable the 8-9 mm length.

Place the wire between those lines and cut as many pieces you want to transform into shackles. In the photo is shown those ear piercing nails I use and incidentally the lines of the page are printed in 8mm space. !

-Take the heavy duty pliers and place each end of those pieces between its jaws, up to the line of the masking tape. Exert pressure and you will have a flat part on each end of the wire. Try to create those flat ends at the same level, although it will be a correction, later in the process.

Remember, the tape was placed at 2mm on the flat space, so it helps you not to measure every time how much part of the wire should be flattened.

post-617-0-47570600-1465122677_thumb.jpg

 

When you finished with the flattening, it’s time to use the haemostatic pliers.

Take each piece of the wire and place each of the flattened parts between the jaws of the h. pliers under the 0,50 hole you have made.

Then with your rotary drill, and through that hole, try NOT to make a hole but a scratch mark on the flattened surface of the wire. You might have some holes (as in photo) on some of the pieces but this is not the aim at this stage. There is only one hole in the nose of the h. pliers, so if you try to make a hole in the wire by force, you probably will need a drill bit, for every hole you open…You can finish the job later over a wooden pad by the help of the scratch marks.

post-617-0-35796800-1465122747_thumb.jpg

 

At this stage and if you like, you can round a bit the edges by the use of a thin file.

post-617-0-22412900-1465122883.jpg

 

 

Edited by Thanasis
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Next stage is to give a general “U” shape to those metal pieces.

-So by the use of a rounded nose plier on the edge of a surface (I suggest a wooden one), push each piece to bend it. Be aware, not to exert pressure at the edge of each piece but on the not flattened part of it. Because of the flattening and the hole, the edge has been weakened and you might ruin it. That’s why I mentioned “on the edge of a surface”.

 

-It’s also important to bend them symmetrical so that the edges be equal to each other.

 

-At this stage, when you have “U” shaped them all…you must align the holes on each metal piece by both axis.  

post-617-0-71328300-1465122947_thumb.jpg

 

Finally, we come to the last stage.

Take every “U” shaped metal piece and place it under that modified hinge and in specific, between the pivot and a wooden pad. Then with a round nose plier exert pressure on the metal piece at the same time at both sides of the hinge. One or two passes will give you that “Ω” shape-the result you want. No need to mention, practice always leads to improvement…

post-617-0-53504400-1465123005_thumb.jpg

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What has left is the “key” of the shackle.

You might find your way to represent that “key” but following the above method, you have to consider at least the diameter of the holes of the shackles. It’s rather rare to find something to look like nail…3-4 mm long and with less than 0,50 mm in diameter.

 

Thankfully I recalled a tip from another mate some years before.

For those who are not familiar with the inner of a pc, the processor has one of its surfaces full of pins. What I did, is to set up a small fire in my backyard and take the last offer of an Athlon processor….

Then I collected many and ready for use “keys” for my shackles.

For those who will follow the same tip, you will find that many of those pins come out with some lead on their head. Don’t panic. Just keep them with a tweezers over a lighter's flame…

post-617-0-62870800-1465123111.jpg

 

....................................................post-617-0-38460400-1465123247.jpg

 

That’s all mates. I hope at least I have inspired you and I’m sorry if you get tired with the use of English language... post-617-0-82745500-1465123436.gif

 

Many thanks

Edited by Thanasis
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very inspiring work Thanasis,

 

Those shackles look super !   Thanks for sharing this......

 

Nils

 

Current builds

Steamship Ergenstrasse

Completed

"Mississippi Lady"  sternwheel steamer 1:30 kit build fun boat as Xmas present

"Zeesboot"  heritage wooden fishing small craft around 1870, POB  clinker scratch build scale 1:24

Pilot Schooner # 5 ELBE

Chebec "Eagle of Algier" 1753--scale 1:48-POB-(scratchbuild) 

"SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" four stacker passenger liner of 1897, 1:144 (scratchbuild)
"HMS Pegasus" , 16 gun sloop, Swan-Class 1776-1777 scale 1:64 from Amati plan  (scratch build)Pilot schooner #5 Elbe

"Pamir" 4-mast barque, P-liner, 1:96  (scratchbuild)

"Gorch Fock 2" German Navy cadet training 3-mast barque, 1:95 (scratchbuild) 

"Heinrich Kayser" heritage Merchant Steamship, 1:96 (scratchbuild) 

"Bohuslän" , heritage ,live Swedish museum passenger steamer (Billings kit), 1:50 

"Lorbas", river tug, steam driven for RC, fictive design (scratchbuild), scale appr. 1:32

under restoration / restoration finished 

"Hjejlen" steam paddlewheeler, 1861, Billings Boats rare old kit, scale 1:50

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Very much a genius tutorial, Thanasis.   Thanks for posting it.

Mark
"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me

Current Build:                                                                                             
Past Builds:
 La Belle Poule 1765 - French Frigate from ANCRE plans                             Triton Cross-Section   

                                                                                                                       USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War  _(Gallery) Build Log

                                                                                Wasa (Gallery)

                                                                                                                        HMS Sphinx 1775 - Vanguard Models - 1:64               

 

Non-Ship Model:                                                                                         On hold, maybe forever:           

CH-53 Sikorsky - 1:48 - Revell - Completed                                                   Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0 (Abandoned)         

         

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

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Nicely documented technique Thanasis; thanks for taking the time to share.

 

cheers

 

Pat

If at first you do not suceed, try, and then try again!
Current build: HMCSS Victoria (Scratch)

Next build: HMAS Vampire (3D printed resin, scratch 1:350)

Built:          Battle Station (Scratch) and HM Bark Endeavour 1768 (kit 1:64)

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Many thanks for your compliments mates.

Happy modeling to all.

post-617-0-50617900-1465188603.gif

Thx

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Thanks for taking the time to make this presentation.   It never ceases to amaze me how many talented members with ingenious ideas that we have here at MSW.

 

Allan

PLEASE take 30 SECONDS and sign up for the epic Nelson/Trafalgar project if you would like to see it made into a TV series.   Click on http://trafalgar.tv   There is no cost other than the 30 seconds of your time.  THANK YOU

Current Builds - HMS Litchfield 1695 - Scratch 1:64 HMS Boston 1762 -Scratch 1:196

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanasis, I don't want to accuse you of being a 'copy-cat' as you probably don't read German - and therefore didn't see the article I published in 1980 in a modelling magazine that describes exactly the same technique ;)

 

http://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/tips/FALCK-SM-5-80.pdf

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg
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  Thanasis....Thanks for taking the time on a wonderful tutorial.......and I'm guessing mere coincidence on  technique duplication from days gone by....

 

 

JP

Built & De-Commissioned: HMS Endeavour (Corel), HMS Unicorn (Corel),

Abandoned: HMS Bounty (AL)

Completed : Wappen Von Hamburg (Corel), Le Renommee (Euromodel)... on hold

Current WIP: Berlin by Corel

On Shelf:  HMS Bounty (Billings),

 

 

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Thank you for your very goog instructions. Not all builders are willing to share their secrets so I thank you. I will keep this topic in mind for later.

 

Regards, Kees

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Thank you for the great tutorial! Great minds think alike ... Wefalck! 

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Thank you all for your comments mates.

 

wefalck . Thank you also for your notice.

Well, believe it or not I wasn't even thinking to involved with ship modeling back in 1980 (at my 18) therefore at that time I wasn't following any ship modeling magazine and especially in German language, which I don't speak or write.

Wanting or not to accuse me, and being (me) a bad user of the English language, what really bothers me in your notice, is your words "probably" (I don't read German) and the "exactly" (same technique).

By those words what I get, is that you have doubts whether this technique is not a copy and you decided to share it with the forum.

I really can't read the text in the pdf of your link, so apart from what I can see (a drawing which shows a piece of wire being flattened at its edges - what else someone could think at first making shackles), I would like to translate the text and point me out the "exact" same procedure.

Many thanks

Edited by Thanasis
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I tried to be 'tongue-in-the-cheek'

 

I often found that it is very hard to get across the intention of how you say something. The message is written and body language is not readable, the lack of intonation is a definite problem too. Besides these factors, at MSW we deal with quite a few people whom do not have English as a native language, some of which even use a translation site to be able to communicate here with us all, which I find very commendable, and which amongst other things makes this site such a great place to "hang out"

Edited by cog

Carl

"Desperate affairs require desperate measures." Lord Nelson
Search and you might find a log ...

 

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