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rwiederrich

Great Republic by rwiederrich - four masted extreme clipper - 1853

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17 minutes ago, druxey said:

Of course SilkSpan wrinkles with water-based paint, Rob - unless you pre-stretch it like watercolor paper. That solves the problem. See that booklet I referenced earlier.

This is the kind of information I'm talking about.  Hints, techniques, and processes.

I will get my hands on one...thanks.

 

Rob

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Rob,

Thanks for your compliment, pleased to help. Convincing looking sails in proper scale, are not easy to replicate accurately. Same goes for water! :rolleyes:

 

The publication to which I'm referring is not a newsletter but is the "Nautical Research Guild's Journal," which is printed quarterly for members (and now posted online — go to: www.thenrg.org). The NRG is the owner of this forum and I recommend looking into an NRG membership which will give you access to the quarterly.

 

Sail on.

Ron

 

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Thinking this through....I've decided to make both the lower topsail and the main course...but not attach them at this time.  My plan is to remove the main yard so as to facilitate the addition of the main shrouds and ratlines.  I would have to swing the yard out of the way and if the lower topsail's sheets are fixed...the yard will not move.

So its best to just leave them both off for now and follow the assembly steps I have outlined.

 

One problem(and it was brought up in Ed's log), is that of arm fatigue when rigging the top yards(and sails in my instance).  If memory serves me, I recall it was an issue with my last clipper.  With fatigue comes mistakes and even damage.

 

By following my method I believe I will keep most of the complex rigging down low and near the deck where I can rest my arms/hands on nearby bench work or sturdy fixtures.

 

I will have to identify the location of belaying pins and drill all the holes for them in the weatherdeck rail before I step any masts.  Which brings me to that very subject.  Since the GR had no bulwarks  nearly all of her sail and yard control rigging had to be belayed at the rail after it was purchased by one of six crab winches.  I think I might employ 3 of these winches to purchase the main braces.  A process not typically modeled on the average clipper.

 

Thank you for the fine compliment and encouragement.. and thank you everyone for your likes.

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

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poking my head in here Rob and marveling over the progress you've made.........very nice indeed!  mast and sails look superb.........just hate to be you  when it comes time to terminate all those lines :unsure:   I know few folks that do it this way........I'd be too concerned I'd lose track.   very well done!

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The downhauls are a slightly heavier line then the rest of the running rigging.  As I progress down the mast, I'll slightly increase the diameter of the line as heavier members are supported.  The sail rigging(Bunt, clews) will remain the same.

 

I began making the lower topsail...it and the main course will be made together.

I think I only have the lower topsail lift left..before I'm finished and I can step the mast.

 

Rob

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Then when everything was right....I removed the mast...placed the mast boot...applied the glue, placed the fife rail then glued things into place.

 

I purposefully did not glue the fife rail down at this time in case alignment issues arose.

 

Now, I'll wait till things are good and solid before my next step.

 

Do I begin the mainmast...or should I finish rigging the shrouds on the foremast...while everybody is removable..so I have plenty of room?

 

I might just do that...pull out all the other masts and focus on the shrouds and finding homes for all the line.  I'll need fairleads on the shrouds anyway before any lines find belay pins.

 

Rob 

IMG_8212.JPG

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6 hours ago, michael mott said:

Nice looking sails Rob.

 

Michael

Thanks Michael....I've spent years developing the right (from my point of view) look using paper.  They still have a natural translucency, but are not unduly wrinkled or opaque.

Plus they are easily and quickly made, with very little fuss.  I back lit them to demonstrate the natural look of them.

 

Rob

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Rob,

If it was me I'd rig the shrouds while there is plenty of room and no real interference.  Plus it might help with arm fatigue not straining around obstructions etc.  But either way its looking great.

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4 hours ago, Dowmer said:

Rob,

If it was me I'd rig the shrouds while there is plenty of room and no real interference.  Plus it might help with arm fatigue not straining around obstructions etc.  But either way its looking great.

Yeah...Dowmer...I think I might just rig the shrouds and get the foremast secure... before moving onto the next.  Having the most room aft will be quite beneficial.  

 

All these sails really require loads of control rigging and I can tuck that all away nicely after the fairleads are installed on the shrouds.

 

I'll work on that tonight.

 

Rob 

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31 minutes ago, GMO2 said:

Do you have a tutorial on your technique for making these sails from paper.They are really nice looking,and I have wanted to add a few to the C.W. Morgan I'm starting to rig.

GMO....the only tutorial I have is the images I posted....AND any information your require...I can personally tell you...walk ya through it stuff.

 

If you need any assistance just ask, and I'll be more then happy to walk you through it.

 

First...you need a piece of paper(Copy).  Draw on the scale panel lines for your scale.  Remember to draw both sides...  Making sure they are over the top of one another.   Then make double sided copies of the *Master* blank.  This will be your starting point.

 

Rob

 

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I removed the tape that held the rigging and now I am aligning and separating them to prep them for, either belaying or fixing them with blocks and their purchases.  The lower topsail yard halyard needs its purchase rigged too.

First I had to drill and mount a number of belay pins on the main weather deck rail.

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IMG_8214.JPG

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Next..I had to decipher the lines and determine their belay locations.

I then fixed the halyard to its proper padeye at the base of the mast.

 

I want to get some of these lines that will be belayed to the spider rail and fife belayed so they are out of the way when I begin to rig the shrouds.

 

Rob

IMG_8216.JPG

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