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rwiederrich

Great Republic by rwiederrich - four masted extreme clipper - 1853

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Added the rest of the upper topsail rigging.  Just a few touch-ups and some detailing left.

 

I'll step the mast..then begin the main shrouds.  I have to swing the main mast port/starboard to make this the simplest it can be and that means I cannot fix the lower topsail until that work is complete.

 

Have a fine evening.

 

Rob

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Here are some pix of the stepped mast from several angles.

 

Got to let it dry for a couple of hours before I begin to focus on deciphering the many lines and getting the correct ones belayed on the spider band. 

 

I'm enjoying the speed of the build at this point...I truly think this technique of nearly finishing each mast before stepping....makes the completion look as if it's not years off.......

 

Rob

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Working through detangling and assigning the royal and topgallant sail control lines...I will give them special attention running them down through the top fairleads  at a later date...  Now the fife and spider rails are in and collecting their specific lines.

 

Slow going...but after I spent a week working on my wife's hair dressing station...I'm going to focus back on the build.

 

I'm finishing up the Port side...then, I'll flip the model round and have at the starboard side.  So much to do.

 

Rob

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Some top detail of the topsail sheet blocks.

 

The spaces around these items is extremely limited and I have already damaged several things by bumping into them with my hand....Grrrrrrrrrr

I hate repairing hard to fix rigging.......

 

This is why I'm slowing down on the main mast rigging....when I finally get to the shrouds...I'll be out of real danger for the most part..but as I begin to work around these fragile yards and masts...I need to slow down and make each move count.

 

Repairs behind me.....    For the time being.

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I read an account that briefly noted the distinct red color of the counter wheels....not sure if it was a preference of McKay's or not. (I'm sure there was a logical reason).

It makes for a far more dramatic note then simply being black as was typical....but the Great Republic was not to be typical.  She was a ship of *Firsts*. 

Just how McKay designed her...he did it his way.  Twice as big as any other clipper, carried the most canvas hung on the longest yards, used a steam engine to work winches, had 4 full decks with 8ft ceilings, complete/full extended weather deck, patented building ventilation and tween deck lighting, four masts, the list goes on.

 

I'm just sad that many modelers won't even model her because they do not like the way the spanker mast appears to be ill designed, giving her an off balanced appearance of afterthought.  Comparing her to more modern German cargo carriers that were of the 4 masted barque design.

Personally, I think this is a shortsighted view to base their opinion on.  There is so much ingenuity and distinctiveness about her to make her a centerpiece of any collection IMV.

My preference in ships is clippers...and(for modeling purposes), not just the *average* clipper, but those of distinction....those so unique that conversation surrounding them with expert and novice, can lead to a greater fondness of the lore of these magnificent ships.

 

Rob

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Personally, I think a 1/96 model of the Constitution as a receiving ship would be an awesome project....I'm considering it.

I did the derelict Ferreira(AKA Cutty Sark).  What a conversation piece. 

 

Few people realize that the Constitution served in other capacities.

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Rob,

 

One question about the pictures. The planking between the waterline and the sheer of the original ship appears to be uncaulked (in the second picture, it almost appears lapstrake). It also seems to protrude (or maybe cover) the wales. I wonder if this was an additional layer of planking while she was a receiving ship?

 

Is there much information out there for the years she was a receiving ship? That would make for a fascinating model.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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12 hours ago, capnharv2 said:

Rob,

 

One question about the pictures. The planking between the waterline and the sheer of the original ship appears to be uncaulked (in the second picture, it almost appears lapstrake). It also seems to protrude (or maybe cover) the wales. I wonder if this was an additional layer of planking while she was a receiving ship?

 

Is there much information out there for the years she was a receiving ship? That would make for a fascinating model.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

Harvey...From what I gather.she was resided only in clapboard to simulate her *building* appearance and to *clean her up* as it were.  I will provide some more images for your pleasure.

I completely agree...in this state...at this point in her history..she would make a fascinating model.  Something you just don't see everyday.

There are plenty of models of her during her original rig and some during the war of 1812 and even later...but none of her in her less attractive days as a receiving ship.

I'd love to know if you would consider building her...I'd love to follow that log.

 

There are lots of images and articles about her as a receiving ship on line.  Good luck.

 

Rob

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Edited by rwiederrich

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great job on the main mast so far Rob........the rigging is very good.......looks awesome!  :) 

 

 

I never knew that about the Connie........don't know why I've never heard about it.   I happen to have a connie kit in the closet.   this could be very dangerous info to pass onto me :ph34r:

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13 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

I never knew that about the Connie........don't know why I've never heard about it.   I happen to have a connie kit in the closet.   this could be very dangerous info to pass onto me

Hopefully dangerous enough to spur you to action...and you attempt to build her as a receiving ship.  I'd follow that log with great interest.  

Really, all one needs is the two hull halves of a Revell 1/96 version and they can scratch build the rest with the help of HO scale lumber from any number of HO scale logging kits....or simple strip styrene...scale windows can be had easily as well......

 

There...I got you started.....ready....set.....go.

 

Rob

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32 minutes ago, Dowmer said:

Rob,

I noticed the orientation of the bottom deadeyes on the channel.  Is that correct?

 

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Good catch.....I intentionally placed the channel deadeyes upside down to facilitate the means by which I attached the deadeyes to the channels.

Holes were drilled up and into the deadeyes so a wire could *bolt*(In my case glue) the deadeye in place.

if the scale of the model had been larger then 1/128...say 1/96 or 1/72...I would have stropped the eyes with banding as would have been typical.  I chose the more expedient compromise.

Like I've said before...I'm not a purist...but I sure know the difference.  Nearly 48 years of passionate study of the subject allows me the license to alter minor details to satisfy the need to actually have a completion date for this model......

 

In my case the modification nearly goes unnoticed....unless close-up pics are provided to give away the modification.

 

I've been found out.

 

Here are some finished foot ropes...that are NOT typically fixed with clove hitches.

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10 minutes ago, rwiederrich said:

Good catch.....I intentionally placed the channel deadeyes upside down to facilitate the means by which I attached the deadeyes to the channels.

 

In my case the modification nearly goes unnoticed....unless close-up pics are provided to give away the modification.

 

I've been found out.

 

😀  No worries Rob, I’m not really that anal.  It’s just one of the things I look for since so many people get the orientation wrong (unknowingly).  I understand, sometimes it is just practical at the scale you work.  We all make sacrifices. 

 

The ratlin’s look very uniform and tidy BTW.  Nice job.  👍

 

 

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19 hours ago, Dowmer said:

 

😀  No worries Rob, I’m not really that anal.  It’s just one of the things I look for since so many people get the orientation wrong (unknowingly).  I understand, sometimes it is just practical at the scale you work.  We all make sacrifices. 

 

The ratlin’s look very uniform and tidy BTW.  Nice job.  👍

 

 

Thank you very much.

I too, tend to pay close attention to details that may go unnoticed on other folks models.  As you rightly pointed out..some, young in the hobby, make mistakes unbeknownst to themselves...and others, cleverly disguise or distract alterations/modifications for some unknown practical purpose. (Not forgetting the need at times for great artistic license due to lack of credible information).  Both of these characterizations will cause the discrete educated observer to question.  I appreciate your observation and most of all your desire to point out a blaring error that without proper explanation could leave a model and its builder with less than  a reputable reputation.

I'm no expert....but I'm also no novice.  More like a *Hack* then a purist.

 

Rob

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When I begin the lower topsail...I had hoped to create a bit of wear on the sail by creating a discolored panel...or simulate several repaired panels by making them slightly darker.  It was not unusual to have even fairly new canvas that was not perfect looking....there were slight differences in the panels.  I think the added detail will greatly add to the authenticity of the sails.

 

I even toyed with the idea of making the main sheet billowy as if being furled or nearly unfurled. And the Mizzen main furled.

Similar to this image of Glory of the Seas.  Any opinions with that idea? 

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2 minutes ago, ccoyle said:

Just a personal opinion, of course, but I'm not a fan of the billowy look. I think that it's hard to pull off in a convincing fashion.

Yes...a convincing billow with all the activity of the buntlines and sheets does present a real issue...however, working with paper that has been wetted and then molded into a convincing shape and then dried can be done successfully.  Once fully dried the sail is then painted and rigged just as I have outlined with the other sails.

I appreciate your opinion...and I tend to agree with you.  I'll fully experiment with the technique before I conclude it will be good enough for the model....but I have high hopes.

I'll keep everyone informed of my progress.

 

Rob

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