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Beforehand - sorry for my ugly English,i'm a novice.

 

Everyone know how old,colorless wood looks like.How can i turn my normal woods on my model to something like this?Simple gray paints won't work i expect.Real hull and deck looks like this:

 

b68db2ff2eab4d4719493eeec27401cd.jpg

 

How can i do the same but with my model?

 

P.S. one guy make something like that and i must to say he succeed,how does he perform such a result?

post-25495-0-57157900-1468235711.jpg

post-25495-0-77007000-1468235713.jpg

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Hello Engeland, 

 

First of all, I believe your picture does not show a real wooden ship, but instead a replica used for movies. The extreme left of the picture certainly shows an iron hull where the orange spots are rusty patches. If so, the ship is something like a ghost ship where gray-black planks, masts and even sails would seem appropriate.

 

But natural wood from which sailing ships were made doesn't show this colour neither at the beginning, nor when it goes older. Instead they look something like this:

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/20110417_Lelystad%3B_Batavia_Haven_12_ship_at_Batavia_Harbour.JPG

 

The hulls were made of oak planks protected with a mixture of pitch and tar. When saying tar, you would not think of nowadays tar derived from oil which is mainly black, but instead of some wood distillates which were mostly brownish in colour. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

There are a couple of basic questions to ask first:

 

- is the model made from wood or other material, namely plastics ?

 

- if it is made from wood, do you intend to keep the appearance of the real wood it is made from, or do you intend to cover it in opaque paint ?

 

There are various painting guides around the Internet for aged wood, namely in the railway and diorama modellers realms. Some use real wood as a basis and other plastics.

 

In the case of real wood, this is usually stained in some grey, controlling the process to keep perhaps some of the original wood colour. Applying white, black, and burnt umber as washings allows to modulate the basic grey. At some places a technique called 'dry-brushing' may be applied to highlight surface features.

 

On plastics, you would apply similar processes, but you would start from an undercoat of light ochre to simulate the wood.

 

Like the Old Master, in principle all the various aging or weathering effects can be achieved by painting. However, in particular the plastic modeller community has developed a range of processes that involve more or less controlled random processes, such as stripping paint layers with adhesive tape, deliberately reducing the adhesion of paint layers in order to partially strip them later to achieve a flaked impression, etc., etc. Again, there are numerous tutorials on the Web as well as in printed form available.

 

In think I pointed to some of my own work in a similar thread. This is a 'resin' modell with an ochre undercoat and various washes of burnt umber (both acrylics). In addition water/salt 'stains' were applied using white pastel chalk:

 

BotterModel-080.jpg

 

BotterModel-088.jpg

 

In the scenic setting of the above model I used real wood for the landing stage etc. that was treated with stains and acrylic washes:

 

BotterModel-197.jpg

 

I tried to give some keywords to search for in the Internet that give more detail than this short post.

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