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Robin Lous

Greek Bireme by Robin Lous - Dusek - Scale 1:72 - First wooden ship build - FINISHED

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True...although....about 550 BC...thread and fabric were likely not as fine as in more recent years.

But the ingenuity and craftmanship of the ancient Greeks were amazing, so who knows?

 

the "curtain lines" (does anyone know a better word for this?)....

 

I take the evening off...done enough for today  :rolleyes:

 

Robin :)

bireme build122.jpg

Edited by Robin Lous

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I was going to say clew and bunt lines also. Those are the terms that I have seen them called on most ships but, due to the era and region of your particular ship they could be called something else.

 

Excellent work on the sail, mast and rigging so far. I agree that I love rigging the first mast also... after that well.... :P

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Thanks a lot gents!

 

As you can see, I still have to do the clewlines (the ones on the edge of the sail).

The brass eyes for them on the yard are already there, but I'm unsure about loops on the sail for them.

Didn't spot any on the Olkas photo's. I think I do just one loop in the middle, so the line won't wander off that much.

 

What shall I do? A furled sail or a deployed sail?

Historical....sail + oars are a no no. the Greek didn't use both together

I planned to do a furled sail, because of that, but with the added details a deployed sail can look nice. I don't know what to do now!  :(

Edited by Robin Lous

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Good point Don and OC!

 

With the sail furled, the rigging, deck and general appearance of the ship will be more visible.

Together with the historical sail/oar "issue"....I guess I better stick to my plan.

 

EJ....I come from planet Plastic and I'm used to do stuff never to be seen again. 

Something the Admiral loves to point out. :blush:

Edited by Robin Lous

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Good point Don and OC!

 

With the sail ruffled, the rigging, deck and general appearance of the ship will be more visible.

Together with the historical sail/oar "issue"....I guess I better stick to my plan.

 

EJ....I come from planet Plastic and I'm used to do stuff never to be seen again. 

Something the Admiral loves to point out. :blush:

Me too  i once built that Fab plastic sub with all the intside details, that after building and painting inside and out - was glued shut never to see the inside again.

 

OC.

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But hey, if you take your model/s to a contest, you can be sure some judge/s will be there with a flashlight looking inside every possible opening to see whether you finished everything inside or not.

Been there and done that many times in the past. 

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It's been a while since I checked your build, and I can only say how impressed I am with what you've achieved.

 

I have to make shields as well for my dromon and so far I haven't found a satisfactory way to do it. Maybe I can emulate your method. Can you provide some more detail on how you went about it?

 

Steven 

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Hi Steven,

 

Sure...I used 0,15 mm thick brass sheet (Albion Alloys).

To shape the bowl I drilled a 1 cm hole in a scrap piece of 2mm thick plywood.

Lay an oversized piece of brass sheet on it and pressed the bowl with a round tipped hammer.

I didn't hammer...just pushed and turned it around until I had a nice bowl in the sheet.

Pushed the edge next to the bowl flat...think I used therear end of an Xacto handle for that...not sure.

Cut out the shield with scissors and filed the edge until I was happy with the result.

A trident decal, painted the edge black, gloss varnish.

 

Since the brass sheet is very thin, it's easy to shape.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Or...your build is 1:50 scale, that's very close to 28mm wargaming scale.

Take a look at this...

 

http://www.victrixlimited.com/collections/greek-ancients/products/greek-unarmoured-hoplites-and-archers

 

Robin :)

bireme build123.jpg

Edited by Robin Lous

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A bit quiet on the bireme front at the moment. 

December is a busy month for me. Not much shipyard time...and when I have time, I'm often too tired to do anything.

For a while I thought I was able to finish this build before the end of the year, but I'm afraid it will take me about 2 more months.

 

I more or less finished the yard, sail and most lines involved (6 more will go on...4 of them after I fixed it to the mast).

 

With the sail loosely pulled up. It works! :)

 

I'll tighten the sail to the yard a bit more and fix the tight bundle with sail coloured sewing thread. That won't be visible.

Even when tightened to the max, the sail bundle will be somewhat too bulky, but not too bad I think.

 

More... semi-soon I hope!

 

Robin :)

 

 

 

Edited by Robin Lous

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Thanks Carl...and...yes...I read and thought about that, but I wasn't sure about what to do with the sail, so I kept the full size.

I was also curious about the the curtain system, so I made it 100% functional.

 

I'll reduce the size of the bundle more, but it will still be oversized.....for future builds I'll use half size or tissue paper.

 

Edit:

 

I just checked what's possible with what I have now...on the photo shown the thickness of the bundle is 1 cm (loosely pulled up).

When I pull it tight and press the sail together to the max it will be about 5 mm thick (35 cm converted to real size).

I think that's acceptable, specially since the sail wasn't tied to the yard...just pulled up by the bunt and clewlines.

 

I plan to tighten the centre part of the sail (8 buntlines) and let the edge (the clewlines) sag a bit. (pulled down by the sheet lines (Dutch: "schoot"). 

 

Note: the 8 buntlines will go to the large pin rail on the rear deck. The 2 clewlines and the sheet will go to the pin rail on the railing on the rear deck. Lines from the tip of the yard will also go there. With 1 stay going aft...15(!) lines altogether. This will result in the typical ancient Greek "harp look" rigging.

Edited by Robin Lous

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Today I finally found some time and...more important...energy to do at least something.

 

Finished the yard :rolleyes: (hey! it's something!)

5 of the lines will go down alongside the mast. The rest will go to the several pin rails on the rear deck.

The 2 sheet lines and the 2 lines from the tips of the yard can wait.

 

I'll now "do" the mast. Not too much work...6 stays and 5 blocks fixed to the top of the mast...plus 6 blocks on the end of the stays.

 

Maybe the mast and yard can go on before Christmas? That will be nice.  :)

 

More semi-soon again!

 

Robin :)

bireme build125.jpg

Edited by Robin Lous

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Thanks Messis...I can't thank you enough for the photo's you send me. They help me tremendously!

It's not only nice for my build, but to know the purpose of all lines and blocks made me understand the rigging of ancient Greek ships.

 

Without your photo's it would look like..."ok, it looks a bit like something greek"...but not even close to the real thing.

 

Thanks a lot! 

 

Robin

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Merry Christmas to you all!

 

The kind people here make my build even more enjoyable! I'm not even sure I could manage to do it without you guys.

Not even asked for much advise, but the encouraging words are very helpful.

 

I'm so looking forward to continue and finish the bireme. 

Extreme december business now.....think 450+ customers per day who need advise and gifts wrapped. It's insane!

The shipyard will go full swing again soon...right now I'm glad I survived the day!

 

Thanks guys!

 

Robin

Edited by Robin Lous

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I'm back on the shipyard!

 

Things slowed down early december and I've done nothing at all the last 2 weeks, but now it's January and I have the time, peace of mind and energy needed to work on my build again.

 

Where was I? Ah! yep....the mast!

 

Here I go again!....more soon!

 

Robin :)

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Mast done.

 

Nothing spectacular and the only reason I post this is because it's a "I'm back on track" photo.

 

So I placed the mast with the 6 stays attached to it (1 goes forward, 1 goes to the rear and 2 to each side).

I now must do the blocks. One on each stay and the same amount of blocks attached to the ship to tention the stays.

 

I'm still struggling with the proper nautical word for them. In the Dutch language...and nautical terminology... these blocks are called "jufferblokken"...dead eyes in the English language. The Dutch language makes no difference between one or three eyes. They serve the purpose of a dead eye block...just 550 BC...with one eye. It's what the ancient Greek used. English nautical terminology call one eyed blocks...heart blocks.

I just don't know how to call them here.  :(

 

Pfff....anyway....the first update in almost 3 weeks.

 

Now...12 blocks (give them a name...I don't know) to do to attach the stays to the ship.

 

With some luck....monday.

 

More soon.

 

Robin :)

bireme build126.jpg

bireme build126b.jpg

Edited by Robin Lous

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Call them what you want it's your log! :D

 

I do like to try to use the proper word for a part both for my education and that of who ever is reading my post. That being said, I still don;t always do that. Often times I am trying to explain something that either I or my readers do not fully understand and therefore common wording must be used. I run into that a lot on facebook when I am sharing with my friends and family. If I use wording like abaft, gunwale, bulwark, even port and starboard they can easily get lost. At that time I have to decide how much typing I want to do. Do I explain every term or do I just simplify? Simplify usually wins.  :P 

 

Anyway, welcome back to your build! As you said, it may not be much but it is another step forward and a little closer to finishing.

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hiya EJ!

 

Yeah....the difficulty is...we (the Dutch) have the odd habit to feel superior, because we used to bully half the world with our infamous VOC.

We find it hard to realise we're no longer on top of the food chain, so we keep pretending...against all odds and reality.

 

Aren't we cute?  :rolleyes:

 

About Facebook....search for my name. Friends and family are my wooden ship adventure cheerleaders. 

When I tried to explain....it's not a good idea to slam a bottle of champagne against the bow when finished...they simply claim the bottle to drink! (clever gits!) It's tough to be Dutch! ....specially since we have to deal with the Dutch each and every day ourselves!

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