Jump to content

Flexament cement


jdbondy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Has anyone tried using a fly tying adhesive called Flexament? I am trying it on seizings that are done with synthetic fly tying thread. Since I am trying to swear off of the CA for fixing seizings, I have tried dilute white glue (doesn't bond well to synthetic thread) and flat topcoat/varnish (requires setting overnight). Flexament appears to be a possible solution. It appears to be thinned rubber cement, or at least it certainly smells that way! So far, testing a seizing made with 6/0 Unithread appears to be giving a pretty fast and durable bond.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Les here. This is news to me, as I would like to have something on hand besides CA. My only concern would be the long term holding power of this adhesive. Having to go back and tighten things would be very bad. Best to go to their web site, contact and ask some questions. Let me know as I am interested.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problems I am encountering using varnish as an adhesive are: 

 

1. I'm not sure how secure of a bond is created between a synthetic fly tying thread and a cotton/linen rigging line with varnish.

 

2. Since varnish has to dry overnight, I have to leave my knot gluing until the end of the work day, so I just have one cleanup after gluing multiple knots. As a result, I lose track of which knots I have tied and need to be glued up. It would be nicer to have something that can be applied when the knot is tied, bonds pretty quickly, and doesn't require cleanup.

 

I'll see what info I can find out from the manufacturer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problems I am encountering using varnish as an adhesive are: 

 

1. I'm not sure how secure of a bond is created between a synthetic fly tying thread and a cotton/linen rigging line with varnish.

 

Strong enough. Since they are static, not working items, a minimal amount of strength is needed.

 

2. It would be nicer to have something that can be applied when the knot is tied, bonds pretty quickly, and doesn't require cleanup.

 

Hmmm.. this is exactly how I work with varnish. Never needed clean-up

 

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Les calling back. This is a case of six of one or half a dozen of the other. CA vs other 24 hr adhesives. Rigging is always a stressful time in any project. So much work in such a confined space. Whats not to like! When I screw up my courage and go for it I want to carry through to the end as quickly as possible. It's not that I don't  like rigging as it I get satisfaction from this part of the build, as it's just as important to get this right as the hull and all the other goodies that make your ship, boat or whatever. If you can wait overnight good, if you need to power through great. Sorry for the vent. Do what works for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ulises, my point about cleanup was that I was typically applying the varnish with a brush, which I then have to clean up with spirits. So I was tending to keep that to the end. However, your comments have made me rethink the application process. I've started applying varnish like I do CA, with a pair of tweezers dipped in the varnish. Now, cleanup consists of wiping the tip of the tweezers with my fingers! Much easier.

 

Now I have 3 separate tweezers, one for CA, one for varnish, and one for Flexament. Each is appropriately labeled.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les, I've been in touch with the makers of Flexament, and they describe it as intended for bonding synthetic and natural fibers, with the ability to hold up in adverse conditions such as wetness and sunlight. 10-15 seconds for it to start working, and set in 1 hour.

 

I made a seizing using Unithread around some Morope, applied Flexament, and let it sit overnight. I cannot get the Morope to budge within the seizing without applying a really high amount of tension, far more than we would put on a model's rigging. 

 

For now I think my plan is to use varnish/topcoat on seizings or knots that are entirely natural fiber, and Flexament on seizings or knots that are a mix of natural and synthetic fiber. I am trying not to use CA at all, except for curing the tips of rigging line for threading purposes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I have been using fly tying "head" cement for years.  My father in law tied flies and when he was teaching me to do it, all I thought was what a wonderful adhesive this was for seizing.   Most cements had a strong odor, but pretty much all today are oderless.  I have not tried Fixament.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Securing' a knot with glue/varnish means that you overcome the springiness in the thread that has a tendency to unravel knots by some sort daub. This something very different from glueing two materials together. In the first case the process of knotting forms an interlocking, mechanical connection, that is not there in the second case. When your knot does not form this interlocking connection, then something is wrong with your knot. Seamen's knots are always secure.

 

I use a fast-drying clear varnish for the purpose that is very similar, in fact, to nail-varnish. The advantage of varnish is that you can loosen the knot (or belaying) again by putting a drop of solvent on it. Comes handy when you discover mistakes, or when you need to tighten/loosen something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I wanted to update a recent experience I had this past few weeks.  Over the years, I used "Headly's" fly head cement, which is epoxy based and has an odor than will drop a fly a 1000 yards, has a quick cure time, and required acetone to clean up.  I dropped my jar and it broke so I went to the outdoor store to pick up another bottle and they informed me they no longer carry it.  They gave me a water based, non toxic head cement called "Loons Clear Head".  And they are correct, not a odor at all.  Better yet, I can put it in a hypo needle and apply it and then wash out the needle with hot water to reuse.  It has a slower cure time but can spray a dab of their water based solvent on the area of application and it cures almost instantly.  The epoxy based cement always had a high gloss when cured, this new cement dries dull.  I am about 70% through putting the sails on my Constitution and have used it on all my knots and seizes on the mizzen with happy results.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...