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G.L.

HMS Triton cross section - FINISHED - by G.L. Scale 1:24

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Wow, the painting of the friese is looking great.

One suggestion: if you choose this kind of presentation, it should be good to paint the inner side wall red. this can be seen in contemporary models and also in the Marshall paintings. If it's not possible to change this detail it is also fine

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On ‎22‎-‎3‎-‎2018 at 10:09 AM, AnobiumPunctatum said:

Wow, the painting of the friese is looking great.

One suggestion: if you choose this kind of presentation, it should be good to paint the inner side wall red. this can be seen in contemporary models and also in the Marshall paintings. If it's not possible to change this detail it is also fine

Thank you for your appreciation Christian.

Thank you also to let me know the Marshal paintings. They are marvelous. 

Your idea to paint the inside walls red is good, but I will not do it. With the gangways and the brackets in place it would be too difficult to do it. I used HMS Victory as an example, on the Victory The inner bulwarks are in ocher, so I believe that I am not completely wrong in my color choice.

 

G.L.

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I read on this forum that the Mermaid class frigates underwater hull were painted with white stuff and later (for HMH Triton in 1779) were coppered. Some of the cross section builders show both versions, one side white and one side coppered. I decide to follow their example. Starboard side will be white and port side  coppered. Here you see starboard side:

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In our local garden center I found copper strips to protect vegetables in the kitchen garden against snails. It consists of a copper foil strip which is self adhesive. Probably  effective against snails, but certainly effective for ship modeling.

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To obtain a nail pattern on my copper strips, I draw the pattern on a piece of wood and drill the nail holes (ø 1.5 mm).

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In each hole I put a 1.5 mm nail of which only the head sticks out of the wood surface. As I will glue the copper sheets from under to above and from aft to forward, I wait to place the nails of the upper- and left edge. They will be each time covered by the previous layer. When gluing the upper layer, the upper edge will be nailed as well.

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To imitate the nail heads on the copper plate, I lay the copper strip on the nail bed and rub with my finger over the copper sheet until the nail heads are embossed in the copper foil. Thereafter I cut the copper to the right dimensions, in this case 2x6 cm).

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As the copper foil is self adhesive, the fixing on the hull goes easily.

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Coppering finished!

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Edited by G.L.

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Thanks for your appreciation, Ward.

It is the moment to make the most important equipment of a 18th century warship: the artillery.
I want to cast the gun barrels in tin. To make the casting mold, I turn a model of a gun barrel in wood. I start with drilling the hole for the trunnions next to the center line of a piece of olive wood.

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Then I turn the barrel in accordance with the plan.

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I leave a funnel-shaped appendix at the gun mouth. It will form the pouring opening in the casting mold.

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The mold will be made in a small wooden box in which fit the gun model. The purpose of the two small planks with the conical wooden pins next to the box will become clear soon. The two nails in the trunnions keep my gun model in the middle of the box and will also make two air tunnels in the mold through which the air can escape when pouring the melted tin in the mold.

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The mold will be made with a heat resistant silicone. It consists of a red colored raisin which has to be mixed with 2.5% hardener.

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My box has a volume of about 22 cl. I start with making 10 cl of silicone and pour it in the box. I press the gun model in the silicone until it sits approx. halfway in the fluid.

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 I lay also the two planks with wooden pins on the box in such a way that the tops of the pins are sitting in the silicone.

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A day later the silicone is hard (or soft like rubber) and the pins can be removed. They form four conical holes in the top of the bottom half of the mold. All silicone spills on the wooden gun model are removed. I spray some release agent on it.

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Now I mix again 10 cl silicone and fill the box.

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A day later the mold can be dismantled and the two halves can be taken token apart. In the bottom half of the mold are the four pits of the wooden pins and in the upper half four protrusions which perfectly fit in them. They make it possible to join the mold perfectly.

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I use tin for plumbers to make the guns. It is sold as rods of about 30 cm long, pieces can be sawn of with a metal saw. My melting furnace is a simple spirit fire and a small sauce pan.

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The melted tin is poured in the mold.

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Some ten minutes later the mold can be opened. Be careful because although the tin has solidified, it is still very hot.

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The pouting funnel is sawn of and I drill out the mouth of the gun.

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All the mold seams are filed and the barrels are blackened.

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Thanks for your reaction, Patrick

 

To make the gun carriages, I refer to Cross section HMS Triton log of Tkay11. Tony wrote an in my opinion very clear handout to make the carriages. I follow his handout for the most part and do not intend to rewrite everything that he wrote before. I will only expatiate where I went my own way.

Sawing the jig for the gun carriages assembly.

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The jig with the brackets for 2 carriages in it.

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Sawing the brackets for 2 carriages in one go.

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Making the axel trees. Here I went some more artisan than Tony. I sawed out the wheel axles square with the jigsaw

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Then I filed and sanded the square axles round.

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Plying and soldering the rings.

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The small side of the stool bed must have a rounded notch. I make it with a round file

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The bed lays with a nick on the metal truck. The nick is sawn out with the jigsaw.

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The parts of the gun carriage

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The gun carriages are assembled with the help of the middle piece of the jig.

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Gluing the transom.

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Gluing the stool bed

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To make the cap squares I make simple jig. I saw a piece of hard wood in two, clamp the two halves together and drill a hole in the middle.

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Giving form to the cap squares is now simply done with the help of a drill and a hammer.

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Two finished gun carriages after being stained.

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Edited by G.L.

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2 minutes ago, G.L. said:

 

 

Edited by G.L.

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I think that something went wrong with the post of my last report therefore I repost it.

 

To make the gun carriages, I refer to the log Cross section HMS Triton log of Tkay11. Tony wrote an in my opinion very clear handout to make the carriages. I follow his handout for the most part and do not intend to rewrite everything that he wrote before. I will only expatiate where I went my own way.

Sawing the jig for the gun carriages assembly.

339.thumb.JPG.0829840c80b0aab44125186f9171e1c1.JPG

The jig with the brackets for 2 carriages in it.

340.thumb.JPG.3cd7f212b1e60e6d0f2fc5fa1237ce12.JPG

Sawing the brackets for 2 carriages in one go.

341.thumb.JPG.a8bfe37c2a1af7833e2ba7a7d5e2ed27.JPG342.thumb.JPG.9580753123983fcdc57fd17a59917ecd.JPG

Making the axel trees. Here I went some more artisan than Tony. I sawed out the wheel axles square with the jigsaw

343.thumb.JPG.a454b4dc4dabcbeb5b87b6f184ef613b.JPG

Then I filed and sanded the square axles round.

344.thumb.JPG.01a464d4f7268fb96be3b191c5ff6899.JPG345.thumb.JPG.a3c1ab4966e3044c15e6f967313f5ee5.JPG346.thumb.JPG.7e089311a0343d75a2bc1144bb5e9d43.JPG

Plying and soldering the rings.

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Foto 347, 348, 349

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The small side of the stool bed must have a rounded notch. I make it with a round file

351.thumb.JPG.9e5de61631c935833bf64d0655b79758.JPG352.thumb.JPG.697a748462c7da89c42c51694c0f118a.JPG

The bed lays with a nick on the metal truck. The nick is sawn out with the jigsaw.

353.thumb.JPG.91fe3f92a39ce07fdb1aa8fa5eee7d8b.JPG354.thumb.JPG.1064fde109d91ad9922341c1431b2fb2.JPG

The parts of the gun carriage

355.JPG.472e266a312ef4db4cd1756b7e7a0a3e.JPG356.thumb.JPG.5c04caa075ca5b29d228e0aab757f4b9.JPG

The gun carriages are assembled with the help of the middle piece of the jig.

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Gluing the transom.

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Gluing the stool bed

359.thumb.JPG.345c9262cf9a9c8e05f59c7c7cf47ca4.JPG

To make the cap squares I make simple jig. I saw a piece of hard wood in two, clamp the two halves together and drill a hole in the middle.

360.thumb.JPG.9fc914315b4d2dd0aacc7452ce11aae9.JPGFoto 360

Giving form to the cap squares is now simply done with the help of a drill and a hammer.

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Two finished gun carriages after being stained.

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Edited by G.L.

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Thanks Jan.

It has been a while since I made my last post. To be honest: I completed my cross section in the meanwhile, but during the last two sunny and hot months I disliked it to spend much time behind the desk and computer. Now I carry the consequences of my lazy behavior: I have to finish my story.

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I will rig the guns in a secured for sea position (not ready for action).
Therefore I need eight blocks. I saw first the sheaves for the blocks, 2mm slices of a brass rod ᴓ 3mm.

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My cross section is a stationary model, so the sheaves of the blocks must not be able to spin. I glue them on a small wooden lath on which are glued at regular intervals pieces of wood.

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Another lath is glued on top of it and the individual blocks can be sawn.368.thumb.JPG.d813293b028a1d521e03952905a5de2c.JPG

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The blocks need now some shaping and sanding and they are ready.370.thumb.JPG.b314ce482295ca69a22b0b15d28470a8.JPG371.thumb.JPG.457ad459b50e7a0709f96cd23a6d5ff2.JPG

The only further thing to do is rigging the two guns.372.thumb.JPG.0ac8b22e9836e3d47d18c3cfe987acc1.JPG373.thumb.JPG.a89b6539ad9cd00f4968bb947f2ef398.JPG

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Thanks Patrick and Mark.

Before showing some more pictures of the finished cross section, first some pictures of the making of a showcase. The base plate of the case is a MDF plate, painted in light grey. The small recesses at the corners will hold the four struts.375.thumb.JPG.289a9319c63f104c68d0d1971094e28f.JPG

In the middle I make a little cadre which fits in the bottom of pedestal to prevent the model to slide.376.thumb.JPG.d7c98f60f7c9a9f4ec3bacc6a4a30fce.JPG

The four struts are placed. Each strut has two grooves to hold a 3 mm glass plate.377.thumb.JPG.54aad65da49f0425de99fb9bf3cf30a4.JPG

With the top frame placed. There is no glass yet in the case. The top frame is liftable to keep the showcase accessable.378.thumb.JPG.bf824d7ee6c65f36ebc3a5725a24d7fd.JPG

The inner edges are finished with mitred oak strips.379.thumb.JPG.996d44c60cf07f2ac3c4b084f20fdc3c.JPG

The outer edges. The nail heads will be punched with a pin punch and the holes will be filled with malleable wood paste. The show case will be stained dark.380.thumb.JPG.dc8f41daa25fcaf945a427ec583d331e.JPG

The showcase with the cross section in it.
The model on top of it is the 'Belgica' of my modeler friend Ward (can be followed on this forum). We meet with some ship modelers every month to show each other the progress of our projects and to share experiences.

 

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Edited by G.L.

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23 hours ago, ChadB said:

Woohoo! Great work and congrats on the completion!!! Now the obligatory question... whats next? 😉

 

Chad

Thank you for the compliment, Chad.

For the question 'what's next':

I still have a project running: Oostends schipje (Ostend shrimper) by G.L. - scale 1:20, building first POF Edition 2

My log on that went a more or less to dormant mode, I urgently need to inject some life into it. Although the next step is making sails and I wait until winter to do that because than it is mostly too cold in my workshop to work there. Sail making has to be done in house where it is warm and I have my wife available to introduce me into the wonderful world of the sewing machine.

Last week a started a log on a new project, also a cross section:              Cross section Fishing Smack by G.L. - Scale 1/20, POF, approx. 1920.

It is my goal to update this log every Sunday.

Edited by G.L.

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