Jump to content

What is your preferred work height?


Recommended Posts

My preference including eating is to stand up. Reloading, leather work and tooling, bench work in the shop or working with tools in the shop all are done standing.

  Reminds me of an old Truck Driver question.

What is the first thing a truck driver looks for after leaving his truck? Most look for a place to sit down. Watch, it's true.

jud

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on what I'm doing, and if I'm sitting or standing (my length: ~6' 5.5"

 

Chisel and wood: standing, bench hight 3' 4"

Airbrush: standing, tableau hight 4'

Cutting, plastic parts/wood: sitting, bench/table 2' 8"

Working on a model: sitting, between 3' 4" and lower, depending on the height of the model

Edited by cog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is information I found on a website:

 

Guess these values can be used for fixed stations as well.

 

I found that the countertop height of 36" is perfect for me when standing, while 30" when sitting.

Depending on the chair. :P 

Then again adding a machine on the top and suddenly your work height has changed.

Maybe I have to do some mock ups before going the whole way out.

 

 

  • Height for Sitting Adjustable Work Surfaces
    • Minimum: 25” - 30”; Range = 5”
    • Optimal: 22” - 33”; Range = 11”
  • Height for Standing Adjustable Work Surfaces
    • Minimum: 38” - 42”; Range = 4”
    • Optimal: 35” - 47”; Range = 12”
  • Height for Sit-to-stand Adjustable Work Surfaces
    • Minimum: 26” - 40”; Range = 15"
    • Optimal: 22” - 47”; Range = 25"
Edited by Nirvana
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have different heights depending the work station.. My main build table though means I have to stand as top of the build board is approximately 1 foot above the work surface yet it matches the other work areas.  Top surfaces of all the work areas (including my build board) are 36".  I do have a wooden "bar" stool that allows me to sit if I don't feel like standing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I switched to the adjustable one (just $400 in ikea, http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/00263218/)and am really happy ever since.

No more head or neck pain, bending in a weird pose, etc. I move it a lot when working, depending on the type of the operation.

It is heavy and stable.

That is how it looks. Max height is 1cm below the drawers level.

post-5430-0-89492900-1477345599_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mike Y
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike,

What is the size of your work area?

​Not included in price.

Per,

 

Here they have but one measure 160 cm x 80 cm => 5' 4"  x 2' 8" for the Ikea desk, but I saw some larger ones 6' wide at the same price, or slightly more expensive

Edited by cog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine is height adjustable, which I have at the maximum of 36.75" which suits me for standing work, but it will lower to 31"

 

For seating I use a height adjustable draughtsmans  chair which allows for most of the height variations I require.

 

The bench is 5' long  x 2' deep, ideally I would have preferred one  3' deep, but that would have restricted other working space.

 

post-11-0-92372000-1477407909_thumb.jpg

 

 

B.E.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike,

What is the size of your work area?

​Not included in price.

They exist in two versions - 120cm and 160cm. But you can buy a frame only and attach any table top to it, which gives you a better flexibility in terms of size. The frame is quite stable and done well, so bigger table top will not be a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A surgeon usually works at about elbow height and everybody else adjusts to that level. I like to do fine work at a little higher level, somewhere between elbow and armpit height.  My daughter who is a glass artist, has vertically adjustable forearm rests for intricate work, and places her forearms on them about mid-way between elbow and wrist.

 

A couple of other minor tips.  To do fine work between thumbs and forefingers (such as threading a needle), sometimes it's helpful to touch the pinky and ring fingers of your hands together.  And sometimes when careful one-handed work is needed, rest the wrist of your dominant hand upon the wrist of the other hand, or use a maul stick as painters do.

Edited by Bob Blarney
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are right Bob, surgeons typically work at elbow height.  But the reason for this is because the sterile field extends only between the surgeon's waist and shoulders.  For certain operations, hand, ear and tonsil surgery for example, we usually are seated, with the patient still at relative elbow height for the same reason.  It has nothing to do with ergonomics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not much choice, my work-benches have writing-desk height. I am also like the lorry-drivers mentioned in the initial post: as am working all-day at my computer, I also like to sit down for the modelling work.

 

The bench-height I think it is a sort of compromise. For some types of work, you want to have the desk more or less at ellbow-height, in other cases you would like to look down on the work. Watchmakers and Goldsmith have heigher desks and adjustable fore-arm rests for intricate work. In the old days the watchmakers apparently also put the wooden storage boxes of their lathes on top of their stools so that they could look down onto the lathe clamped to the desk.

 

For rougher classes of work I have a foldable work-bench on which I would work standing. usually outside because of the dust.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are right Bob, surgeons typically work at elbow height.  But the reason for this is because the sterile field extends only between the surgeon's waist and shoulders.  For certain operations, hand, ear and tonsil surgery for example, we usually are seated, with the patient still at relative elbow height for the same reason.  It has nothing to do with ergonomics.

Hah! Ask a tall or short first or second assistant about the ergonomics of the operating field.  An extended procedure spent holding a retractor without being able to see what's going in the field can get somewhat uncomfortable. 

 

Hmm, another thread might suggest surgical instruments that are useful for modeling work... let's start with curved Halsted mosquitoes, a 6" right angle, 6-7" crile-woods needleholder, mayo scissors, iris scissors, and Brown Adson forceps, and maybe some ligature hooks.

Edited by Bob Blarney
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, another thread might suggest surgical instruments that are useful for modeling work... let's start with curved Halsted mosquitoes, a 6" right angle, 6-7" crile-woods needleholder, mayo scissors, iris scissors, and Brown Adson forceps, and maybe some ligature hooks.

 

Yep, bought a couple of eye-surgery scissors and recycled some of the anatomical(?) tools of my late father, who trained as a medical doctor during WWII, such as (heavy) scalpels, cartilage scrapers, etc. Also, the arsenal of dentists and dental technicians contains useful implements.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My table is 34" wide X 55' 4" Cannot stand due to numerous back surgeries, ( 25 yrs taking a beating in boats  ) Standing and leaning is excruciating :(. Found a barber chair at Good Will Large arrests, heavy seat and backrest, footrest, hydraulic foot pump up to 3 foot. Had to put on rollers. $ 25.00 US. Best I found yet, but can only work 3 hrs max. Before I found this chair could only work  1.5 hrs max.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Hoping my setup from my RC plane building days will work for ship building.

I have two surfaces in my workshop. One is a large oak desk with all my tools in wooden boxes from Ikea. Then I have a sold oak dining table that has been raised to counter height to work standing up. I find staying in one position for too long hard on my back. I also have a few different chairs and stools I switch back and forth.

Edited by Pierretessier
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...