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Hi Pat

 

I’ve been a non-drinker all my 56 old years on this planet, but, man oh man, for me trying to do those rigging screws and eye bolts would be enough to drive me to drink!  You sir, have the skills of a surgeon.

 

Mighty fine work...and how many of them do you have to do? Oh my....

 

Amazing stuff.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

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Thanks Dave; appreciate your comments.

 

Some further small updates; I think the photos show all.  First is the completed (minus firehose/rack) of the Downton Pump area; then the foredeck with chain blackened, and the funnel with its stay chains and finally the painted purchase winches.

 

106924973_DowntonPumpsandERSkylight.thumb.JPG.c3162d4c083cef4d97228fba8a246b82.JPG  449845305_ForedeckTopview.thumb.JPG.adaaa0d3b0e6addc881191b51558868c.JPG  470938507_FunnelandHammocks.thumb.JPG.d377adc677637cb2664aaf2033e76d60.JPG  1768612172_PurchaseWinchesPainted.thumb.JPG.7666dde3c350f3647ddebe5c927989ee.JPG

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

 

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Thanks Ed and Rob, very much appreciate the comments and encouragement.  I have a ways to go yet to achieve the same level of quality you guys produce, but learning with every 'mini-project'

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Posted (edited)

Hi folks.

 

Not much progress to report as I research the masts and rigging plan.  In the meantime I am starting to assemble the 'Rigmaiden Lanyards' which were used in-lieu of deadeys and lanyards.  See my earlier post here: 

 

 

I have had most of the brass strap parts photoetched after drawing them up to scale.  However, I have had to solder a small ID thin walled tube to the ends of each of the chain plate  straps to represent the eye.  these were cut off flush to either side after being soldered.

 

The Contract called for "Lang's Eye Plates" so I am assuming this different (to the usual chain plates) arrangement is what is meant but I am open to suggestions :)  

 

To help cut the slot in the eye to accept the bottom part of the Rigmaiden Lanyard, I milled a slot into the end of some brass square stock then made a sleeve to slide up and down to hold the 'plates'.    the sleeve weas needed to stop the strap bending as they were half-etched at a few point to facilitate consistent and sharper bending points.

 

This jig was then held in a vise which had been mounted into my Vandalay Milling table adapted to hold my Dremel in the horizontal.  For this job, the table was 'adequate' but I would not recommend it for any precision work (simply to much play once the y-axis cross table is added.

 

I think the photos show the principle.  I had to use a longer extension of the jig to approach the saw blade due to the very small blade diameter and not being able to get the table to close the distance (obstructed)

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

272734701_StrapJigOpen.thumb.JPG.9e3db507405f700f40620d35a27b25cb.JPG1238699295_StrapCuttingJig.thumb.JPG.c6855d18e8555e4950e4c2699965499e.JPG605460872_StrapJigFront.thumb.JPG.3feb4cab348e054e0371aab50b743a43.JPG490435048_JiginVise.thumb.JPG.d20dda950ab310b3e746aafb066048ca.JPG281036549_VandalayTablesJPG.thumb.JPG.36c4ee27c73cea0b8ae8aa6695b96e15.JPG

Edited by BANYAN

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Posted (edited)

Hi folks,  thanks for the interest in my little project.  I am still in the learning stages and I am sure some of you more talented/experienced folks could suggest some improvements.

 

Carl;  that contraption is a modified "Vanda-lay Industries' milling tool.  See http://vanda-layindustries.com/

 

Keith;  thanks the jig works well, I just wish I could have got the cross-table closer to the work (shortened the extension of the holder).

 

p.s.  the reason the work is further away is that I had to flip the positioning of the dremel to the back of the tool rather than the front to get the blade rotation (approach to the workpiece) in the right direction so that it minimised the risk of bending/breaking the straps on contact (and there was not enough travel in the y-axis to have it at the front anyway :( ).

 

Rob;  it took a while to sort out the concept, but it was a bit of fun (and frustration) thinking it through.

 

Michael;  See link above re Vanda-lay Industry Tools.  This was one of my first 'adventures' into tooling and worked fine for a while.  However, as I mentioned earlier, I find the tool (as a milling machine - ACRA mill +) much to unstable (too much play  in the Y-table especially).  However, it is a great tool for other purposes.   I asked for a modified plate (L shaped)  adapter by which to fix the dremel holders to allow more positioning flexibility and he was happy to produce it for me.  I use this with the dremel saw arbor / attachment for many tasks where I prefer to spin the cutter/grinder in a fixed position and offer up the work (making templates and the like especially)  It is basically a part from the http://vanda-layindustries.com/html/hold-it_plus_jr_.html  which is adapted to fit on the cross-arm of the Z-axis (see here http://vanda-layindustries.com/html/mill_accessories.html )  which I then asked for modified fixing plate rather than straight one that was being offered.  I am not quite sure where I picked up the drill arbor/attachment; if I recall I will get back to you.

 

I have no affiliation with the company, merely answering the queries :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

Edited by BANYAN

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Interesting bit of work, Pat.  My first thought about the overhang problem was that perhaps you could rotate and invert the tool holding fixture, putting the Dremel in backwards,  to move the axis of the tool closer to the vise, but perhaps you already considered that.  Hard to tell from the pic if it would work.

 

I have the Vandalay thickness sander and really like it - robust and well made - with a big motor - saw me through Naiad and YA.

 

Cheers,

 

Ed

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Hi Ed and thanks for your feedback.  I had tried inverting it, but I would need to redrill the existing, or get a new, Z-Axis bar to mount the tool to.  But even then unfortunately the y-axis table will still strike against the base :(  It was never designed to work in this configuration unfortunately.  If I used it  more often I would consider doing some modifications but I really only use it for template making and the like now (in a more basic set-up) as I use the Sherline for all my milling etc.

 

I would have used the Sherline if I had a way to turn the work through 90 degrees as I have a slitting saw for that. 

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I would do such work on the lathe perhaps. One would need to figure out a work-holding for the cross-slide. If one has a quick-change tool-post, one could hold the square brass bar in that, which has the benefit of limited adjustability in Z. If have done template and scraper cutting that way.

 

Otherwise, as the head of the Sherlin mill can be swung into the horizontal, it should not be too difficult to mount the vise in a way that you arrive at a similar configuration as for the Vanda-Lay mill. Or I did not understand very well the geometric constraints.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi Eberhard, some very sage advice as usual - many thanks.   The idea of  using the toolpost is one I had not thought of; I will stow that suggestion away for future use :)

 

My mill head does rotate through 90 but I have never tried it with the fear I would need to realign things all over when reverting to the vertical.  Call it FOMU (Fear Of Mucking Up) if you like :) 

 

When I did think of that option though, I was wondering how to mount the vise and keep the work at the right level (low enough) - and finding a slitting blade with a suitable diameter that would still clear the cross-slide.  

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

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20 hours ago, BANYAN said:

Call it FOMU (Fear Of Mucking Up) if you like

Pat, I know why you think this and indeed I don't do it frequently but it isn't all that difficult to get it back to vertical. All you need to do is rough set the head back to vertical and then mount a bar in the chuck at right angles to the spindle axis. Attach a dial indicator to the end of the bar and the check the reading against table surface - swing the bar through 180 degrees and check the reading against the table surface. If the readings are different adjust the head verticality until they become the same. It might take some time when you first do it but with practice it becomes a 10 minute job. If unclear I can supply photos.  

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Keith; you are right it is probably an easy task and just FOMU from me :)  I will give it a go soon.

 

I have one more task to complete before taking a break (overseas holiday) soon and wish to try and finish these 'Rigmaiden' lanyards before I go.

 

The problem I am currently having is bending the top strap through 90 degrees either side of centre (back on itself) such that the pre-etched holes all align and I retain a 'neat' loop at the top though which the wire rigging/shackles were attached.  My efforts to date have been inconsistent as can be seen in the two photos of one strap I have tried to bend.

 

I have tired bending the strap around a mandrel (pin in hardwood) then using a pin through the bottom two holes (one either leg) to keep the bottoms aligned, then pressing together with flat-nosed parallel pliers.  I have also tried using another pin behind the mandrel to stop the strap moving away from the pin.  The problem is that the two legs do not always come together exactly (out by .5mm - which is enough to stop the various pins I need to add from being inserted correctly.

 

I have thought of trying to 'fix' one leg of the strap at a preset length such that the bend will always be at the centre point of the strap but the strap keeps slipping and it is difficult to bend the remaining length.

 

Any ideas/suggestions most welcomed :)  Please note none of these elements have been 'cleaned up' (filed etc) yet and the assembled strap is a crude prototype to show what I am trying to do.  The chain plat as you can see has been slotted through the soldered eye.

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

 

439770156_LaniardComonents.thumb.JPG.cce3e46af9ff05cce32f3d7d5868f604.JPG761333697_BentStrapSide.thumb.JPG.23914ffd218cd73be4d8cb75d7df4bb5.JPG

449258132_BentStrapTop.thumb.JPG.c75c1c8adff00f7a87e2d7cd02bd84b2.JPG

163786598_AssembledLaniard.thumb.JPG.2e16033f530d3b79ad1a592566553dc1.JPG

 

Edited by BANYAN

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Pat,

 

Bend the strap around a round bar, oval would be even better. use a piece of metal wire to align the first holes (the ones at both ends) and start pressing it flat together.

 

Starting with a rod, gives you some flexibility in "folding". If you use an undersized rod, the ends will meet and can be flattened already, by using a handtool. Using a small nail or wire makes it possible to align the first hole and press on.

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Pat, perhaps one of those dapping-blocks with half-round grooves would help:

 

2-5-inch-designer-dapping-block-500x500.

You position the strap symmetrically over the groove (you can use a piece of tape as stop) and then push it down with a suitable piece of round rod. Finish the loop with round pliers while the rod is still in the loop.

 

As you have a mill you can mill a half-round slot also in a piece of metal or hard wood, using a ball-nose end-mill or a round burr. The diameter should be the inside diameter of the loop plus twice the thickness of the etched brass.

 

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P.S. one could also take say a 5 or 10 mm thick piece of metal or hard wood, drill a hole of the right diameter through it at the edge and then mill it down to half the diameter - you get half-round channels, voilà.

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