Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Entry by Woodeater,  I thought his method was pretty slick.

 

Click on woodeather (2nd down) not Bob Cleek's at the top though that's useful information as well. 

Edited by Keith Black

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi all, and many thanks for the feedback/suggestions; they are much appreciated.

 

Mark -  the straps are already photoetched with the holes.  my attempts to drill holes at this size resulted in some very 'ugly' results :)

 

Carl and Keith (A) - that is the method I am currently using, but overnight I also thought of trying this with the stub of a suitably sized drill bit.  the greatest difficulty is getting the bend started nicely and consistently at the right point as any over pressured attempts see the legs bending at the inner most holes unfortunately.

 

Keith (B) -  mate, I am not quite sure I could achieve that at this scale :)  The 'notches' would need to be cut only .4mm deep and very accurately placed as these straps are already pre-etched.  That said, this is a great suggestion for the future as I would etch those notches as part of the process.

 

Eberhard - I will also try this today (wood version as I don't have a dapping block)  and see how it goes.  Splitting the block correctly (accurately) will be the challenge :) 

 

I am also thinking of remaking the bending jig with a narrow hardwood wood base (to fit in a vise), then fit a (broken) drill bit of appropriate diameter into one end about the length of the folded strap back from the end.  I will insert (upright) an offcut of flat brass plate the same thickness as the lower strap between the drill bit and the end (to maintain the correct separation.  If I achieve this, and using the drill bit to align the lower holes of each leg, I may be able to get better (more consistent) results.

 

I  am finding that whichever method I use, the critical step is the initial bend point being 'on centre' - that is where I am having the real issues.

 

cheers (and many thanks again)

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't realize the holes were pre-drilled.  Have you thought of small pliers (needle nose type) with on jaw that round?  I recall seeing them used.  The ones that have, the rounded part is tapered but I've also seen some here that non-tapered.  Not sure if they're custom made or can be bought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, BANYAN said:

I  am finding that whichever method I use, the critical step is the initial bend point being 'on centre' - that is where I am having the real issues.

If you use a rod to bend it around this requires far less accurate bending in the beginning. The importance is to have a rod slightly undersized, so you can get the ends meet flat-ish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, bit the bullet after some further experimenting and decided an improved version of what I was doing was the better solution.

I made a jig (see photo) which has the spacer piece in the wake of the mandrel (end of 0.6mm drill bit) - this is exactly in line although the photo does not show it too well.  The length of the 'blade' allows the legs of the strap to be folded back and roughly aligned with a broken drill bit (agin 0.6mm) used to get the bottom holes roughly in line.

1838089075_StrapbendingJig.thumb.JPG.40204d2a86e1148c11ed5697dec4c059.JPG

The important bit here as I suspected, was to put an initial bend on the centre of the strap for which I used a pair of wire bending pliers (smallest diameter).  The drill bit needs to be long enough to provide a good grip on the protruding ends as I found that if I offered the assembled rough bend onto the vertical mandrel them  applied pressure by pulling back from the mandrel it was easier to get a consistent bend.  

418737022_Roughbentstrap.thumb.JPG.e16d74444f6af0e04324995fb5501190.JPG

The other important part of the technique was to apply pressure to the full length of the straps as starting at the mandrel end resulted in kinking of the legs and overall bend.  Bit tough on the fingertips but no blood donated to this part of the build (yet) :) 

1213728876_Roughbentstraponthejig.thumb.JPG.052c95220550604fd99955188793b8e8.JPG

Once I got on a role it only took 30 minutes to produce 40 of them.  the result is not too bad and once filed (cleaned up) should look acceptable.  Here is one rigmaiden lanyard I have assembled but not yet attached to the chain plate.  Still some cleaning up to do, but to the eye they look pretty good - this is taken at macro range.

1254112755_FoldedUpperStrap.thumb.JPG.67b97ff84ece3654e719dd289c4ecab4.JPG

170711470_FoldedStraps.thumb.JPG.e055962b32784a66a6ce548d689d0915.JPG

Next job is to solder a small piece of plate in the throat of the bend above the upper holes which acts both as a spacer and as a preventer (to stop the untensioned lines/shackles for the shrouds sliding down between the straps.

 

I also need to build a jig to hold the chain plate eye steady while I pein the end of a brass nail (cut to length) placed through the split eye of the chain plate and the larger hole in the end of the rigmaiden lanyard.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pat

 

I've been reading your build log from the beginning and I just wanted to stick my head in to compliment you on your work.  You've produced some very fine details which is a real challenge at this scale, and the model in general is looking very sharp.  Very clean work and pleasing to the eye. 

 

Gary 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi Pat and Steven, thanks for looking in and the compliments guys, much appreciate them as they are great incentives to keep progressing the build.

 

Steven, the ruler is bi'lingual' -  some posts just don't show the metric part - but you have the gist of it :) 

 

Things have been quiet in the dockyard  while I have been researching the 'rig' and sail plans.  In the interim I have been progressing the 'Rigmaiden' lanyards so they are ready to go when I need them.  I have also started making the carriage components for the broadside guns.

 

Things may go very quiet for about 8 weeks or so as I am about to head off on a holiday to the UK, and when I return I have to go in for the first of the 'bionic' replacement parts (total hip replacement) so that will slow me up a little :(   The 'Admiral' has insisted I put as much effort into prepping the holiday as researching the ship, or..... :)  

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, BANYAN said:

The 'Admiral' has insisted I put as much effort into prepping the holiday as researching the ship, or.....

Knowing the amount of effort you put into ship research, is such a thing humanly possible?☺️

 

Steven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Ah, the essential missing information. Hmmm, so you should have been in bed, but are stealthily moving through the house and in the workshop ;) 

Edited by cog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just back guys and catching up on all the logs - great furlough (as Patrick puts it ;) ).  I was able to visit Portsmouth (Warrior and Victory), Bucklars Hard, Royal Yacht Britannia and SS Great Britain amongst the other tour visits - so very worthwhile.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, BANYAN said:

I was able to visit Portsmouth (Warrior and Victory), Bucklars Hard, Royal Yacht Britannia and SS Great Britain

You did get around Pat - and which was your favourite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Keith - HMS Warrior by a long shot :)  There was a very informative guide on Warrior who gave us a lot of his time discussing the armament and other fittings.  We (4 of us) also had unfettered access, with another guide taking us into areas normally not open - which was great :)  Also, I must confess as she is contemporary to Victoria (as was SS Great Britain) this sways me a little.

 

That is not to say I did not enjoy the other, it is just that the Warrior visit was less 'tourist' oriented.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...