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I find that  I don't sharpen my chisels often enough because it is a pain to clear off workbench space, pull the sharpening stones and alignment guides out of the drawer, soak the stones, then clean up the water afterwards.  I tend to wait until I need to sharpen a bunch of blades and end up working with a slightly dull instrument if it is the only one that needs sharpening.

 

Do any of you have suggestions for some way of making this easier?  Any solutions for some sort of limited space sharpening station?  

 

thanks!

 

Dave

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Kurt - I strop like crazy.  I have a good leather strop and stropping compound. After cutting enough notches in deck beams the edge needs refreshing despite the stropping.

 

Grsfax - I could use a single grit for my bigger chisels. I have an alignment guide that holds them at the same angle for sharpening all the time.  For my little chisels, which I use a lot more, my alignment guides aren't as precise, so generally start with a rougher grit and work up.  I used to free hand them, but have been getting a lot better edge with some guides.

 

Mumin - I've thought about this, but the soaking doesn't seem to be my limiting step.  I throw the stones in a bucket of water first. Once I've moved everything that would get damaged if it got wet, cleared some bench space, and gotten the chisel in the alignment guide, they have soaked long enough.  I need something that helps with the whole process.

 

Just wondering what other people do.  Lots of people on the site seem to maintain sharp small instruments despite having limited workshop space.

 

thanks!

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Grsfax - I could use a single grit for my bigger chisels. I have an alignment guide that holds them at the same angle for sharpening all the time.  For my little chisels, which I use a lot more, my alignment guides aren't as precise, so generally start with a rougher grit and work up.  I used to free hand them, but have been getting a lot better edge with some guides.

 

thanks!

davec

No need to use a guide.  I just give the edge a few light strokes along the 6000 grit periodically to keep the edge keen.  I find that I don't need the guide except when I have irregularities in the edge to work out.

Edited by grsjax
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Do you have a 'luthier' workshop nearby?  I visited one to get some advice as their work required constant sharpening of small chisels etc.  i wanted to know which type of chisels and planes to use/purchase and how to maintain them.

 

He was kind enough to spare me some time and his advice to me was to set up a sharpening station and leave it set up; and to hone often, as keeping them sharp was the first priority.  Do you have room somewhere nearby to set up a permanent station rather than at the bench you are working at?  A short walk to the station may be quicker than the constant setting -up and putting-away?  His station was set up in a large shallow plastic tray that he could stow out of the way but then have it nearby to where he was working at the time.  I spent about 3 hours with him, and I think I saw his off-sider sharpen/hone tools at least twice in that period - all by hand.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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cookie sheet  with a felt or something backing might work for you if you can find a space in a cupboard or shelf to slide it into, cupboard would help keep the dust at bay. Lots of stuff in the kitchen that can do double duty. Bread pans filled with charcoal, set alight and dug in under the watering trough keeps the ice at bay. Being in fear of harm, I obtained my bread pans at a yard sale.

jud

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If you like diamond stones, then this clearance sale at Constantines might interest you.  If you can only buy one, then you might consider the medium or fine.  I have a double-sided medium/fine DMT diamond stone. When I need something coarser or finer, I spritz them down with window cleaner (house or car), and then lay silicon carbide wet/dry paper and wet it down too.  The paper will stay put on the DMT stone, and so I can take advantage of the stone's very flat plate.

 

http://www.constantines.com/diamondstones.aspx

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Many thanks for all your responses.  I apologize for my slow response, but ended up working overnight on Tuesday and going to sleep early yesterday.

 

Pat- My workshop is a room off the garage. I probably need to set something up for sharpening in the garage.  I have some room, and wouldn't have to worry about getting my model wet.

 

Grsfax - I need to get better at sharpening free hand.  I used to sharpen without a guide, but have been getting much better results with one. It might have been I just needed more practice.  Would definitely save me some time if I didn't need it.

 

Bob - I mostly use Japanese water stones, and like them.  I use a coarse diamond stone to keep the water stones flat.

 

Toni and Jud -I can probably get away with taking a plastic container from the kitchen, but will have to sharpen all the kitchen knives in return.  I go through mass sharpening just before Thanksgiving every year.  Makes the turkey carving go really well.

 

Dave

Edited by davec
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Hi Dave,

 

I'm one of the guys who uses honing guides. I use a Veritas guide (Lee Valley) for larger chisels and plane blades with Japanese water stones. I've recently been using Kell guide, below, for chisels from 1/2 to 1/16 inches (some shop made). It's pricey, but works really well and has the feel of a very finely made tool.

 

I keep my water stones in a Tupperware tub, with a bit of chlorine bleach, on top of a cookie sheet lined with some non-slip cabinet liner I pilfered from my wife. It a pretty compact and storable sharpening station.

 

Best,

John

 

 

Kell Shapening Guide Link: http://www.garrettwade.com/kell-british-made-deluxe-honing-guides-gp.html

 

post-18302-0-14357900-1479435658.jpeg

Edited by Landlocked123
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Hi John -

 

I use the same two guides and agree that they work really well.  I also use a Grobet graving sharpener for smaller chisels that the Kell doesn't hold well.  Any chance of your posting a picture of your sharpening station?  It sounds like it is what I am looking for.

 

thanks!

 

Dave

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dave - here you go. I think it's all pretty self explanatory. But, the black pieces are the Veritas sharpening guide from Lee Valley. The other is the Kell guide and the stone in the plastic box is to flatten the water stones (a very important part of using these stones). If I recall correctly, the three stones are a 1000, 2000, and 3000. I've had them probably 20 years.

 

Best,

John

 

Kell - http://www.garrettwade.com/kell-british-made-deluxe-honing-guides-gp.html

Veritas - http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=33001&cat=1,43072,43078&ap=1

 

post-18302-0-72681000-1480183654.jpeg

 

post-18302-0-31504000-1480183682.jpeg

 

post-18302-0-96573800-1480183718.jpeg

Edited by Landlocked123
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John - many thanks for posting the picture.  I have space for this.  I really like the use of the non-slip cabinet liner.  I have been using a stone holder that came with one of my stones.  I've accumulated stones of different sizes, so switching stones takes a readjustment to the holder - another step that slows me down unnecessarily.  Agree re the guides- I use the Mark II veritas guide, which works really well for me, and a diamond stone for flattening the other stones.  I was worried about the stones getting mildew in the damp.  The bleach sounds like a good idea.

 

Dave 

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