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Rossi46

What is the most EPIC kit available???

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Hey folks,

 

Im currently mid way through building the HMS Surprise and would like to start researching for a future build. I was hoping to hear your opinions on what is the ultimate kit out there in terms of detail, quality of wood and parts, instructions and sheer presence.

 

What are some of the very highly regarded kits out there... Royal william, SOS, Victory etc... Or any large scale models of smaller boats. Im looking for something very stunning or with a really cool story behind it. Or a high quality large scale viking boat. Any guidance would be appreciated.

Edited by Rossi46

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I don't think or know of any kit I'd describe as "epic" as by nature, all kits have issues, be it wood quality, instructions or sometimes just outright fiction.   However, any kit can be bashed and modified to produce the look and degree of authenticity you wish including details.

 

You'd have to define "stunning" or "story" as those vary by the beholder.  

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I agree with what's been said so far. If you want something truly epic, start with a kit you really like and then super-detail it. In order to make a buck, kit manufacturers have to cut some corners. You find out where the corners were cut, then un-cut them, so to speak, and voila -- epic model. For some good examples of this, check out any of the builds done by dubz; he's quite good at it.

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I agree with everybody. Many of the kits out there are 'stunning' or 'beautiful' or 'majestic' or whatever ..... but they are just kits. To turn a kit into an 'epic' you will certainly need to add extra detail. My advice to you is to seek out a kit that has extensive plans that go beyond what is supplied in the kit material and do your research.

 

Pete

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Look around at the various builds that are on here. There are some huge ships with a lot of details and ornamental carvings or there are smaller ships with less decoration but, due to the design of the hull, rigging and colors it can be even more beautiful to behold. As said, this is mostly in the eye of the beholder as to what qualifies as "epic". As to a kit being "epic", it has already been said that that won't happen. However, any kit can be bashed into an epic model with enough patience and determination of the modeler. 

 

As with all projects I say, find the ship that you think is cool and sparks that passionate interest in. Then however you choose to build it, be it kit or scratch, go above and beyond what it called int eh instructions and push your skill past your comfort zone and into the next level. Then you will have an epic model.

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With your current tool selection I would recommend buying the wood from one of our sponsor sites that specialize in wood for ship building. They are on the front page, lower right. You can get milled lumber in any dimensions you would want as well as sheet material. This would be preferred as you do not have the tools to cut and mill rough cut lumber that could be obtained at a lumber yard.

 

Starting a ship from a pile of lumber is a hard thing to do. I would start trying to modify kits and see what types of materials and tools you may want or need before diving into scratch building. This will familiarize yourself more with ship building and also allow a slower accumulation of tools which will make scratch building easier.

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Rossi,

 

    Where do you live?  It sounds like you are looking to venture into the dark side; heavy kit bashing at (dare I say) scratch building.  If there is a model club near you, I would recommending getting with them as well as interacting here.  Sometimes face-to-face discussions and demos can be invaluable.

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I live in windsor ontario.  I'm leaning towards kit bashing, but could easily see myself ending up scratch building and really getting into carving.  I had no idea what the possibilities were until I started digging into the posts on this site.  But I don't want to get ahead of myself with the scratch build stuff, which is why I'm looking at kits that get you on your way.  I'm looking more and more at smaller boats done in larger scales ie. greater than 1:40, to get that authentic look.  so much to sift through its overwhelming.  My dad just got the Chaperon, and that looks like a blast to build. 

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As others have said, "epic" is in the eye of the builder. I am just finishing a model of the lobster smack Emma C. Berry. This is not huge. It has no intricate detail or challenging rigging. But it is a beautiful model. And as a plank on frame it is very challenging to build it to scale and to a nice finish. Maybe i was lucky, but the kit i got from Model Shipways had great wood and plenty of it. I found it quite enjoyable to build. Did a bit of bashing. My motto is slow and easy; so it's taken me a couple of years to complete. I'm quite proud of the result.

Walt

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When the Amati 1:64 Victory comes out that might be described as epic.

I've heard from a few people about this kit, noone seems clear when it is getting released, but its on the to do list.  I think I'll be able to finish the surprise and then do one more before tackling that beast.  I'm leaning towards the billings boats Oseberg Boat.  Not as detailed and appointed, but I am really interested in its story and have always loved the lines of the old viking boats.  Plus a smaller project will put me in the right frame of mind for the monster Victory:)

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To me, it's not so much the ship that makes a kit EPIC, it's the story behind the ship of the history of the ship that makes it epic. Take for instance a ship that started it's life on the open sea as a slave ship during the height of the slave trade, then eventually was captured and turned into a slave ship hunter that actually went out and hunted those bastards down. Like the Amistad, a slave ship, where the cargo (slaves formed a revolt and took control of the ship). Even the HMS Bounty is a ship with a colorful history. But these ships weren't well adorned nor pretty. To me if it's just eye appeal, you can't beat the Sovereign of the Seas or Wasa for prettiness.

 

To me it's the history of the ship that makes the build come alive. Like the model I'm currently working on now, the Spanish ship Montane's. I liked the history of this ship because the spanish people of the mountain area financed the construction of this ship.

 

mike   

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The epic kit.......that's easy. For me it was Amati's Pegasus then it was Amati's Revenge then it was MarisStella's Trabaccolo then it was MarisStella's Barque Stefano.......................and the list goes on. The first rule in this hobby is "Thou shalt hoard kits" second rule "if you like it buy it"

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I have 3 'epics' to date:

 

My first wooden model build, Emma C Berry

My current, Chaperon

And my next, I don't know what that is, I like the larger scale, working boats, the old eyes are not what they used to be so I avoid intricate rigging. This riverboat is a blast.

 

Len

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"Epic" kits are something that I would not have the knowledge to comment on. But in my opinion the HMS Naiad 1797 1/48 by Albert would certainly be a strong candidate for an epic build.

Wow... Thats all i can say about that build!

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I concur with the above posters dkuehn and Rossi46.

When I started reading this thread my mind was thinking:  "When it comes out, Amati 1/64 Victory could be labeled as epic"

Size, details, ornaments and a myriad of other things we had the opportunity to see while Chris was building the prototype make it a strong candidate.

Edited by Ulises Victoria

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Well i have settled on my next build, and it is in a different direction than i anticipated. Ive just placed an order for the Real by Dusek. My dad sent me link, knowing some of the characteristics i like and he was right, i loved it immediately. It has some beautiful flowing lines, elements of the old greek briremes and just enough rigging, masts etc... To add to the visual appeal. And to cap it off, Daniel was a pleasure to deal with here on the forum and the kit looks to be of a good quality. I havent found a build log, but would love to see one. I will be doing a detailed build log of la real once ive finished with the surprise build.

 

Any info on the real kit would be appreciated

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