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Machine a curer les ports 1750 by guraus (Alexandru) - 1/36

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Now I start wondering: how did this machine actually work?

I though it was somethink like the modern machines, with a number of scoops mounted on some kind of belt, but that wouldn fit on these large wheels, so.... could you explain?

 

Jan

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1 hour ago, amateur said:

Now I start wondering: how did this machine actually work?

I though it was somethink like the modern machines, with a number of scoops mounted on some kind of belt, but that wouldn fit on these large wheels, so.... could you explain?

 

Jan

The scoop was man-powered.  People got inside the wheels (bit like mad hamsters) and spun em round to get the scoop to raise and lower as was needed

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So, two people running a whi,e day likemad hamsters, to get one (or two) scoops up, and down....?

how didthey empty thosescoops? Every timethe scoop was raised above waterlevel, they put a boat under it to empty the scoop?

Sounds like a very time consuming proces.......

 

Jan

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Jan,

 

There will be two scoops - one on each side and they work alternatively: one scoops the bottom of the sea while the other is pulled back in the start position.

 

The big wheel is used to pull the scoops towards the back of the ship via a chain and this is the move that actually does the work - thus the need for more power produced by the bigger wheel with a bigger diameter. The small wheel is used to pull the scoops back in initial position via a rope (less strain on it). The wheels are turned by man power in one direction then in opposite direction.

 

The full scoop is raised above the water and a small boat goes under it and its content is discharged through a lid on the back side of the scoop which is released by a piece of rope acting on a lock mechanism. Once empty the lid is closed and locked in position and the boat moves so the now empty scoop can start its reverse move by turning both wheels in reverse direction.

 

It probably was a time consuming process but it also was the most efficient way to keep the ports clean for more than 250 years.

 

There were 4 anchors dropped from each corner at some distance and these allowed to boat to advance after each pair of scoops - this produced two long cleaned trenches  on the bottom. Then the boat was moved sideways by a couple of feeds (the width of the scoop) and to the process started again to do another pair of trenches next to the previous ones.

 

Probably the best way to understand the process is the picture from G. Delacroix's monographs below (hope he won't mind).

 

Alexandru

 

IMG_0167.JPG

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Thank you all for your kind words.

 

Here is another progress report - I've made the small boat used to transport the dirt scooped from the bottom of the port.

 

Alexandru

DSC07051.thumb.JPG.9a3f8f64564ad7d3cd2687e2be514a8d.JPGDSC07056.thumb.JPG.9eb38298599aedac86117470823fdf1b.JPGDSC07055.thumb.JPG.92483e85e40139324e111f845c68e758.JPGDSC07056.thumb.JPG.9eb38298599aedac86117470823fdf1b.JPGDSC07057.thumb.JPG.bf99a64d61404a4b08dccf19f7c87007.JPGDSC07059.thumb.JPG.a5683654750cb39491d0839a4d839795.JPGDSC07062.thumb.JPG.54a1a57e4d719afe5d9f4c18d56da573.JPGDSC07063.thumb.JPG.883bc0c5917a7af7b83fd1c3d97625f8.JPGDSC07077.thumb.JPG.dadc51325e82475c497d1e97b1114952.JPGDSC07066.thumb.JPG.d24b1d99a4ac7d629324cd292c22b0b0.JPGDSC07069.thumb.JPG.404365436cde80d2e5c9ff7b8b0e4571.JPGDSC07072.thumb.JPG.eab216ac2d4369dcd10ec1cb8e50c035.JPGDSC07073.thumb.JPG.716e79fd931fbef8b1c5db5d99778279.JPGDSC07076.thumb.JPG.9d86dbef0f4d3d03f08e45ad9dd4d4a4.JPGDSC07077.thumb.JPG.dadc51325e82475c497d1e97b1114952.JPGDSC07079.thumb.JPG.2d302489d306a58d43fe16523b06ba79.JPGDSC07080.thumb.JPG.141598b2b5340e67df9a2e36cc233d09.JPGDSC07082.thumb.JPG.d7ca842527399bd1787163945a5460af.JPGDSC07086.thumb.JPG.3f54fbb497545d8f444282ca849eb3b9.JPGDSC07088.thumb.JPG.4c473a2a3b766d3d61f2ec0ed1f15abd.JPGDSC07091.thumb.JPG.d6d4ea5cf538337cc045a81d25992648.JPGDSC07092.thumb.JPG.26d1d54e8540f87bd5b935b05f9473a0.JPGDSC07094.thumb.JPG.3a48f9faa780afc237281d466d18254c.JPGDSC07095.thumb.JPG.7a7f82d1edd8b8b61dbf5b767e5b5899.JPGDSC07097.thumb.JPG.9ea4bb48b3f2d8bdfeca7c7ef03d873c.JPGDSC07099.thumb.JPG.a2b9c2983958e8a942d01b536c8836e9.JPGDSC07101.thumb.JPG.2bf380e64dadf38a7c96fbb48ff62f18.JPGDSC07102.thumb.JPG.269350b106611ba40b8ead003f0fb88f.JPGDSC07103.thumb.JPG.4aa0f94b98a3a46a919442c84cd01504.JPGDSC07106.thumb.JPG.9d98d3f6a17495c2c400e10ae6f2b498.JPG

 

DSC07053.JPG

DSC07065.JPG

Edited by guraus
Order of pictures messed up

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Thank you all for your interest!

 

If you want to see more pictures on the finished model I have them on my personal web site here: http://www.alexshipmodels.com/2017/10/15/machine-a-curer-les-ports-gallery/

 

For now I haven't decided on the next project but I am thinking about the schooner "La Jacinthe" based on Ancre monography. But before starting that one I will probably make some small changes/additions to the models I already built - I usually do that  in between big projects. Like adding the pins on my Victory pinrails or finishing the base for a case I have for my Japanese Fune model.

 

But if I start something new I will definitely post the build on this site.

 

Regards,

Alexandru

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Great work Alexandru; your metalsmithing in particular is very good.  An interesting and unusual subject to model.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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