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Gaetan Bordeleau

74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

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As they say as usual this is quality.   

https://www.paulsfinest.com/Sharpening-Stones-Canada/shapton-glass-stones-canada/#sortBy=r.rating&sortOrder=asc&mode=append

I ordered one from this Canadian site. I tried it and effectively it does the job  in a more efficient way, faster  than a water stone. It is called Shapman glass stone and the bottom of the stone is made of glass. So I ordered other for the finishing and I am sure that I will be happy  with it. In fact, water stone are also effective but there is an aspect that I did not like about these, especially for the lowest grade. Before use  you have to soak the water stone in the water for few minutes and, literally, you see bubbles coming out of the stone.

 

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I'm pretty sure the meteorite metal handle doesn't make it cut any better :)

 

Glad the Shapton stones are working for you Gaetan, I was sure you'd appreciate their efficiency, no need to soak them in water, and the much less mess. Not to mention that they also remove metal faster than anything I've seen.

 

BTW, I only go for a mirror polish on the cutting edge itself. The main body of the blade I usually intentionally flatten down by sanding with 1200 grit or so - I find a large mirror surface like that causes distracting (and sometimes blinding) reflections. If that doesn't bother you, by all means mirror those surfaces.

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Hello Gaëtan ;

 

I do not know if I can speak French language with you ; anyway, I am myself working with Boudriot's books (l'Art du modélisme) and my future intention (project) is not to use boxwood for the sculptures (you indicated that you have no boxwood in Quebec), but tagua nut, which is also called vegetal-ivory.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetable_ivory

 

What do you think of it so far ?

 

Good or bad idea ?

 

Cheers from Versailles (France) !

 

Empathry

 

 

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HI Empathry,

 

There is no obligation to use boxwood. I did some marquetry wit tagua nuts not sclupture. May be it could be good but tagua nuts are small.

There are other woods suited for sclupture in miniature. The idea is to get some hard wood or fruit wood or exotic wood. By opposition, if you wood use balsa, it would be useless; because you cannot add fine details. Boxwood can take fine details like fingers.

 

Sometimes I use boxwood. We have boxwood in Quebec, a  typical tree is 2 feet high.

 

What is your future project?

Why would you not use boxwood?

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Dear Gaetan, I am fond of XVII th century vessels for their obsolete aesthetics and their civadieres.  I obviously have not your skill in sculpture (nor the skill of certain foreign masters) and this is the reason why, making my own historical researches, I am trying to find new subjects (vessels) which should not be directly extirped from Boudriot's drawings.   

 

My favourite scale is 1/75th and this is more easier for me to extrapolate from those less famous vessels.

 

Located in Versailles, and able studying directly within the archives of French "Musée de la Marine" (which is not that difficult), my project was mostly around LE FULMINANT which is the sister-ship of the AMBITIEUX.

 

I had then an accident with my right hand, two surgical operations and reeducation which took me a very long time.

 

Meanwhile, French "Musée de la Marine" closed (maybe for many years) and I do not know if I will be able to wait anymore those many years ... and maybe I will realize only the AMBITIEUX.

 

As for tagua nut, I have some and intend to make tests with it, in the "ivory style" ; this means that I will assemble tagua raw material together in order to make a suitable large piece (sufficiently large enough for a sculpture).

 

My personal reason (for this research) is to try to find other "quaint" solutions than boxwood.  

 

😏         

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There is no Musée de la Marine in Québec, but we have an old french Arsenal in Montréal. Around 30 years ago, I was authorized to manipulate with gloves a copy of Duhamel de Monceau, Traité de construction... If I remember well, this book had many owners and the clergy has been one of them.

 

 I like your idea  to try other wood than boxwood for carving. I  liked to try a lot of exotic hardwood, one of the first reason for color, but I stopped, too much expensive. Last week, I got a piece of cocobolo about 1 by 5 inches by 4 feet; $175, expensive, for all the colors of this plank. Now, I use almost 100% cherry wood. I also tried it for carving, was not so bad but these were not extremely detailed.

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Dear Gaëtan ; I know am a new-bee in this forum.

 

I started hereto a topic for the calculation of the scales on ancient plans, directly based on Duhamel de Monceau recomendations.

 

Accordingly, I also gave a link for the "Elemens de l'architecture navale" edited circa M.DCC.LII (1752) avec approbation & privilège du Roi, as follows :

 

http://www.babordnum.fr/viewer/show/648#page/n297/mode/1up

 

I suppose that you will be one of the few persons in this forum to have the satisfaction to read it "in the text" ...

 

Please Gaëtan, take a new pleasure by reading it again !

 

Empathry

 

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The basis for this theory I had proposed in the a.m. topic "for the calculation of the scales on ancient plans" is extensively described on Duhamel de Monceau' Préface, page fifteen (xv).   

 

Other instructive topics to read are the relative effects of 36 pounder cannons v/s 24 pounders !

 

😉

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On 15/3/2019 at 11:42, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

Como se suele decir, esto es calidad.   

https://www.paulsfinest.com/Sharpening-Stones-Canada/shapton-glass-stones-canada/#sortBy=r.rating&sortOrder=asc&mode=append

Ordené uno de este sitio canadiense. Lo probé y efectivamente hace el trabajo de una manera más eficiente, más rápido que una piedra de agua. Se llama piedra de cristal Shapman y el fondo de la piedra está hecho de vidrio. Así que ordené otro para el acabado y estoy seguro de que estaré contento con él. De hecho, la piedra de agua también es efectiva, pero hay un aspecto que no me gustó de esto, especialmente para el grado más bajo. Antes de usar, debes empapar la piedra de agua en el agua durante unos minutos y, literalmente, ves burbujas saliendo de la piedra.

 

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Good morning, Gaetan.
First I want to congratulate you for what is one of the greatest works for me that can be seen here.
Secondly I would like to know if these stones that work with dry samples or with any element such as water or oil. I just ordered a 1000 grain, and I would like to know more about your experience.
I encourage your model, because it is good.
A greeting from Spain.
Amalio.

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Amalio said:

Secondly I would like to know if these stones that work with dry samples or with any element such as water or oil. I just ordered a 1000 grain, and I would like to know more about your experience.

Amalio, to use Shapton Glass stones, you just put a few drops of water on them, there is no need to soak them. Don't use oil, that would make them hard to clean. Use just a few drops of water and a few more along with a paper towel to clean them up when done.

 

You're also really going to like the speed at which they remove metal, it's very fast.

Edited by vossiewulf

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Thank you Amalio, I am sure you will enjoy it. It is a perfect size to sharpen knife. One of the nice aspect of these stones size is the flatness, very effective to straighten a blade profile.

 

photo 1,2: Just finished t to shape  another 100 parts:  deck beams for the first deck 32beams made of 3 parts each and 3 beams, already made of 1 piece.

 

photo 3, 4: I found a perfect application for my new knives, the fourth one shows how effective it is. Third picture show how the beam rest on a block. It is easier to make the notch if I do not have to hold the part so I can concentrate on holding the knife with 2 hands.

 

photo6,7: gages to measure the width of the deck beams. photo 6 the gage was also use to locate the notches on the frames.

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LED Lighting  https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/LED-Light-Sources/ci/12248

 

Actually, LED lights are the best type we have on the market. By example BH photo sells all kinds.

With this lighting, you take photo as if you were outside in the sun. If you take a photo, you will get the real color and you will not need to ''white balance'' the photo and the white will be white not yellow.

 

Now the bonus side, these LED lamps can also be use for regular lighting in your work. LED lights are very powerful, in fact you must not look directly.

By comparison, if you compare an ordinary lighting with it, you will realize it is like day and night. As we can see at the photography store, there are many prices. If you buy one, buy  the best you can and you will not regret it. 

 

This morning, I took one of my Matthews stand which is usually fitted on a base and I inverted the post and screwed it in the ceiling, so I can add a LED lighting.

Before the Led lights, with other types of lights, surgical light were much more effective than home lighting.

This type of lighting used in photography, especially for video,  is less expensive than  a surgical light of today and it is as much effective.

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Today's photos.

 

Yesterday, I got a Sashimi knife. I did regrind it in a V shape. This way, this knife, can be use with both hands; left or right. To give an idea how it performs, I easily got few millimeters thick slices in a very mature tomato.

 

I did try the last knives I got, and it is clear that scalpels are out of the game. As the doctor said scalpels are made to cut skin. I said many times that scalpels works fine, and it is not false, but a knife with a stronger blade can be as sharp as a scalpel blade and greater strength can be use, a better control with a heavier knife is also possible.

 

I tried the knife from Vossiewulf and it works better than a scalpel also. You just need to add a handle.

 

Just like there are many shapes for carving knives, there are also many shapes for a hobby knife depending of what we are cutting.

 

May be, another avenue, to buy a ready to use knife, I also got, yesterday a knife from Flexcut carving tools. I already have one from this company which is OK. The new one is Wittlin jack with 2 blades. I will try it to compare...

 

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Don't hold your breath waiting to be impressed by the sharpness of Flexcut, their steel is just average. I bought one of their knives, it ended up being used to open boxes that arrive at my door.

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Vossiewulf, for a model ship maker, I find it difficult to find a good place to buy a  ''good'' knife. Rarely, they mention the kind of steel and often the price is in relation of the name but not in relation of how good it performs.

 

 

 

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Lots of knives here from reasonably good to extremely good. Western and Japanese knives. If you want to try western knives, try Pfeil and Two Cherries and they also carry Ron Hock's blades. And any of the Japanese marking/woodworking knives here are going to be Rc63 or so and therefore sharpenable to a very good edge. You just regrind them to whatever you want and make a handle.

 

And if you want an insanely good edge, buy really good Japanese marking knives, they'll be pushing Rc64-65, but edge fragility is an issue.

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