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Gaetan Bordeleau

74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

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As they say as usual this is quality.   

https://www.paulsfinest.com/Sharpening-Stones-Canada/shapton-glass-stones-canada/#sortBy=r.rating&sortOrder=asc&mode=append

I ordered one from this Canadian site. I tried it and effectively it does the job  in a more efficient way, faster  than a water stone. It is called Shapman glass stone and the bottom of the stone is made of glass. So I ordered other for the finishing and I am sure that I will be happy  with it. In fact, water stone are also effective but there is an aspect that I did not like about these, especially for the lowest grade. Before use  you have to soak the water stone in the water for few minutes and, literally, you see bubbles coming out of the stone.

 

FUJI8798.jpg

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I'm pretty sure the meteorite metal handle doesn't make it cut any better :)

 

Glad the Shapton stones are working for you Gaetan, I was sure you'd appreciate their efficiency, no need to soak them in water, and the much less mess. Not to mention that they also remove metal faster than anything I've seen.

 

BTW, I only go for a mirror polish on the cutting edge itself. The main body of the blade I usually intentionally flatten down by sanding with 1200 grit or so - I find a large mirror surface like that causes distracting (and sometimes blinding) reflections. If that doesn't bother you, by all means mirror those surfaces.

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Hello Gaëtan ;

 

I do not know if I can speak French language with you ; anyway, I am myself working with Boudriot's books (l'Art du modélisme) and my future intention (project) is not to use boxwood for the sculptures (you indicated that you have no boxwood in Quebec), but tagua nut, which is also called vegetal-ivory.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetable_ivory

 

What do you think of it so far ?

 

Good or bad idea ?

 

Cheers from Versailles (France) !

 

Empathry

 

 

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HI Empathry,

 

There is no obligation to use boxwood. I did some marquetry wit tagua nuts not sclupture. May be it could be good but tagua nuts are small.

There are other woods suited for sclupture in miniature. The idea is to get some hard wood or fruit wood or exotic wood. By opposition, if you wood use balsa, it would be useless; because you cannot add fine details. Boxwood can take fine details like fingers.

 

Sometimes I use boxwood. We have boxwood in Quebec, a  typical tree is 2 feet high.

 

What is your future project?

Why would you not use boxwood?

3d minerva.jpg

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