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Gaetan Bordeleau

74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

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As far as I can tell, the rudder groove started around 1750 and lasted for around 40 years.  This seems to be one of the French experiments of which they did a lot.  Unlike England, they had (if I recall correctly) 5 main designers and also a school to train for that purpose.   The designers would use what worked for a ship of given size and rating and experiment.  They did exchange ideas and designs so the rudder groove may not have been universal.  

 

I hope someone who knows for certain can be more definitive that what I've posted.

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On 8/4/2020 at 11:01 PM, Jaager said:

  19:81-85  with illustration       chatter strip   16:236

The article Chatter Grooves is 5 pages and was in Issue 19 on Pages 81-85 and was written by John Harland a recognized authority.  A bit more than should be considered fair use.  It is not yet available on the NRG store but I will extract it and make it available by contacting the office and telling Mary the name of the article.  The cost is $2.50 payable by card or PayPal.  She will have it by Monday morning.  It is a PDF and will be emailed.

The citation from Vol 16 - page 238 will also be included - it is a single paragraph question that appears to have been answered by Harland's article.

Kurt

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3 hours ago, kurtvd19 said:

The article Chatter Grooves is 5 pages and was in Issue 19 on Pages 81-85 and was written by John Harland a recognized authority.  A bit more than should be considered fair use. 

There is no need to copy the entire 5 pages. Somebody who did read this article, could have given us an idea in 1 paragraph. 

This way, everybody, could advance in ship modeling.

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Fine.  I thought the idea was somebody was going to post the 5 pages.  Recap it like you suggest.

Anybody who wants the whole article it's available.

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18 hours ago, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

Mark, it is a very simple modification,  but the question apparently will remain: Did it work?

Good question.  I have no idea.  If had been a success, I would have thought that other nations having captured ships would have copied the idea.  

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Without having experienced it, my technical training in fluid dynamics suggests that with the thickness of the rudder blade and the sharp change in shape (tail end of the blade) there would be considerable turbulence experienced which would be felt back through to the tiller, possibly resulting in shaking things up a bit.

 

I am certain each country did "borrow" any improvements in design that they discovered in captured warships of the time, and it was a busy time full of design changes.

 

Kurt, although I look forward to reading a short synopsis on the subject here, I appreciate the availability of the full article and will be getting it.

Thank you.

Alan

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There is another remark about chatter grooves in the same volume Clyde M. Leavitt;NRJ19(1972), 257 - 258, in a modern application.

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