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Alfons

Gloucester Fishing Schooner by Alfons - Blue Jacket - scale 1:48

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Fellow ship builders. A small update from a visual point of view, but rather big from a time perspective.. :)

 

I am detailing the deck, starting my way from the bow. The holes for the deadeyes are drilled trough the main rail and further trough the respective stanchion.

 

Thanks for dropping by.

/Alfons

 

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Thanks for the "likes".

 

I have updated the first post of my log to contain a small background and some other information.

 

An update of my progress is around the corner, stay tuned.

 

Thanks for dropping by,

/Alfons

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Thanks Shamrock.

 

Next update, showing the completed forward deck, is still around the corner. I can't seem to find the time to complete the last parts.

 

/Alfons

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Alfons, after looking at your work, I believe I'm going to ship my PT Boat to you and let you finish it for me!    :D 

 

I must say you are doing a magnificent job, you should be proud of yourself!

 

Tim

Edited by Timothy Wood

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Thanks Tim and Bob, I am quite happy with the result so far.

 

Tim, judging by your progress so far, I am quite confident that you will produce a superb model. At my current building pace, I am afraid that shipping your PT to me would have you waiting for its return for a number of years..

 

/Alfons

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Finally, I got around to finalize the structures and most of the details on the fore deck. There are still some touching up to do, final painting of the barrels for instance, but I feel I have done enough to shoot some pictures.

 

Thanks for looking in, please enjoy.

/Alfons

 

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Alfons:

The deck details look terrific. That is really wonderful work. The paint work is really very good.

 

Russ

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Alfons,

 

That looks super. The color of the deck very much compliments the white painted furniture, the rigging ironwork, the windlass, and hull details. You sure have your painting technique down. All of your painted finishes are opaque, and smooth, and brush stroke free. All of it is impressive, but the area which catches my eye is the interior surface(s) of the dory - small features, the rail over hang, and the inner plank surfaces are clean and smooth. Really really nice work there.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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Alfons,

 

I wanted to join everyone in congratulating you on really amazing work.

 

I too am struggling with Smuggler and your build log has been an inspiration and much needed additional guide. Your excellent photos help explain some of the difficult to understand text included in the kit. This is just my 2nd build, BlueJacket's Yankee Hero being my 1st. Although I really had fun with Yankee Hero and it did get me hooked on the hobby it certainly didn't prepare me for the difficulties with Smuggler. So, again thank you!

 

I do have a couple of questions; What paint are you using? Are you air-brushing? If you prepared the wood for painting what technique did you use? The BlueJacket guide suggest Floquil paint but they no longer manufacture that brand (or at least that is my understanding) and Floquil is difficult to find! Your paint job is so perfect that if you could share your techniques it would be very helpful.

 

Again well done on a fantastic job.

Frank

Edited by Overlander

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Thank you very much for the kind words, and for hitting the "like" button.

 

I am quite happy to have the major deck structures in place, the next step is is to add those small details that really brings the model to life. I am thinking about making a seine, to place on the seine grating. I think the biggest problem will be to pile it up in a way that looks to scale, and to find a material suitable for the net. My initial idea is to cut my mosqito net to pieces, add small white pearls to simulate the corks, and then to spray glue the whole ting to proper shape. Any other suggestions? 

 

Anyways, the last details will have to wait for still some time, first I need to finalise all of the deck and then mount the model to its brass stands. 

 

Overlander. Warm welcome to MSW, I am glad to hear that you are working on the smuggler as well. It sure is a beautiful boat and an excellent kit, and I am glad to be able to provide you with some help and perhaps also with some inspiration.

 

 

 

I do have a couple of questions; What paint are you using? Are you air-brushing? If you prepared the wood for painting what technique did you use? The BlueJacket guide suggest Floquil paint but they no longer manufacture that brand (or at least that is my understanding) and Floquil is difficult to find! Your paint job is so perfect that if could share your techniques it would be very helpful.

 

I mostly use Humbrol enamel paint, but more importantly, a proper primer based on aceton. All paint is applied with a good quality brush, I did not use an air brush so far.

 

My experience is that the painting result mainly rely on two important things. Firstly, a proper and thorough surface preparation. Secondly, several thin layers of paint, rather than a few thick ones. I prepare the surfaces by sanding them smooth, last sanding is down with fine steel wool, then I apply my aceton based primer. Once the primer is proper dry, I gently rub the surfaces with the steel wool again, smoothing out all the fibers that has risen up. Then just apply your paint, careful not to stroke the same area twice. And thats it :) There are also areas were I didnt use any primer, for instance the main deck, the jibb boom, and the cargo hatches. The reason for this is that I wanted the paint to really soak in, creating the worn look that I wanted to achieve. Once dry I gave these surfaces a good rub with stel wool.

 

I also plan the painting process in detail before the actually assembly of the parts, most of the time I paint small subassemblies or single parts prior to assembly. I prefer to do it this way rather than building the complete structures and then having to use loads of masking tape in tricky places. (Speaking of masking tape, I find the Tamiya tape to be outstanding). Here is an example of what I mean, the split lines between the different colors and structures are (if i may say so) perfect. This is because the parts are not glued together prior to painting.

 

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Needless to say, I really like sharp lines and clear cuts :) I´d be crying if the crisp woodwork I had spent hours to achieve got messed up by bleeding paint and fuzzy lines. 

 

I hope that my answer will be of some use to you, I am happy to help. Please consider starting a build log for your schooner, I´d really like to follow you along. It is very simple to get a log started and it does not take much time to make an update avery now and then. Had I not started my log, I am pretty sure that the Smuggler would be tucked away in my drawer long ago..

 

Thanks for dropping by.

/Alfons 

Edited by Alfons

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Alfons,

 

Thanks for taking the time to share your techniques and your advice. Those edges are razor sharp and obviously are what make your work so much admired.

 

A build log, well maybe one day when I reach an acceptable skill level.

 

I have found Humbrol paint on Amazon, but I am having trouble finding primer based on aceton (or as they label it here in the States, acetone). I have not given up and will keep looking. Waiting with much anticipation for your next update.... No pressure. :)

 

Frank

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Overlander. I am quite sure that any acrylic based color will do the job, I have worked with other brands besides Humbrol as well. The key is not to apply the paint to thick, I got myself a can of thinner that I use every now and then to get the right thickness.

 

Same for the primer, there is no need to go for the acetone based ones in particular, I am sure there are others just as good. The important thing is to treat the surfaces after priming. I use steel wool but you can use a fine sanding paper as well.

 

As for starting a build log, dont hesitate to do that, all levels are accepted and apprechiated. This is my first build, we have all been beginners at some point.

 

I will keep my eyes open for your build log, no pressure :)

 

/Alfons

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I am thinking about making a seine, to place on the seine grating. I think the biggest problem will be to pile it up in a way that looks to scale, and to find a material suitable for the net. My initial idea is to cut my mosqito net to pieces, add small white pearls to simulate the corks, and then to spray glue the whole ting to proper shape. Any other suggestions? 

 

Any ideas about the seine?

 

/Alfons

Edited by Alfons

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Alfons,

 

Ships in Scale had a 5 part article about building Smuggler and in the Sept/Oct 2012 issue the author describes how he made his seine net. If you don't have that issue I can copy the text for you. I ordered the back issues and they arrived this week.

 

Overlander

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Ships in Scale had a 5 part article about building Smuggler and in the Sept/Oct 2012 issue the author describes how he made his seine net. If you don't have that issue I can copy the text for you. I ordered the back issues and they arrived this week.

 

Overlander

 

Thanks for the generous offer. If possible, please send me a PM with the article in some form, I am sure there are loads of interesting stuff in there. Ordering these magazines from the US tends to be rather costly.

 

 

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Excellent work Alfons. Everything looks so crisp and clean. Usually the fishing dories on a New England fishing schooner were stacked up in a nested fashion, as many fishermen would leave the mother ship to fish for cod by themselves. When these fishermen returned back to the mother ship, their dory would be stacked on top of one another for storage.

 

Montani semper liberi   Happy modeling

   Crackers     :)  :D

 

Thanks Jerome. That is one sweet stack of dories. I think my schooner will have just one, I need to spend the little available time I have to complete the rigging. But who knows, maybe I´ll build a second dory in the future. I can see an interesting "stand" for the bottom dory in the picture, I was wondering how those might look, maybe I´ll steel that design :)

 

/Alfons

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Hi Alfons

 

Just catching up on your build log, you have and are doing a great job on your fishing schooner, keep up the great work. I am in the midst of building the HMS Victory and have around 6 months at least before she is complete. My next build will be a scratch build on an a early 1900s fishing schooner the Annie M. Parker that my Great Grand Father commanded in the early 1900s. So far I have the hull line drawings and also the sail plans, that is a start for sure. I intend to order some wood and plywood for the frames in the next month or so. I like the way you have planked your deck, did you bevel  the edges of your planks to get this affect ?  Also may I ask what type of wood did you use, it sure dose look great.

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Canoe21, thanks for the kind words, I am glad that you like my work.

 

It sure sounds like an interesting project that you are planning for. As you perhaps have noticed, there are quite some knowledge in the forum related to early 1900 schooners. What scale do you plan for your build?

 

As for the deck on my Smuggler. I used the schribed veneer that came with the Blue Jacket kit, the type of wood is Bass wood. I then carefully cut plank by plank from the sheets of veneer, and cleaned up the edges. The only thing I regret is that I didnt cut the planks in proper lenghts, allowing for planking buts at appropriate frame positions.

 

The schribed veneer is available from the Blue Jacket web shop by the way.

 

Thanks for stopping by.

 

/Alfons

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Hi /Alfons

 

Yes I have always had an eye for the Fishing Schooner, I built the Bluenose 11 many years ago and now when Victory is completed around the first of the year I want to build my Great Grand Fathers fishing schooner the Annie M. Parker. I do have the hull lines drawings, I am looking at a 1:50 scale that would give me a moulded hull size of 25.416" .I believe that this size will give me a lot of room to add a bit of detail. I was kind of leaning to a mahogany planked deck, just love the bevel plank edges that your ship has. Thanks for your interest in my little under taking. ENJOY.

 

Regards Lawrence

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Hi Alfons,

 

I too am building the Smuggler as a first build and have read through this log several times. I'm about ready to build the masts and stays and the tackle the rigging (quite scared actually). For some reason, I am unable to see the photos you posted on Dec. 23, 2013 and I sense they would be quite helpful to me. Is there anyway you could repost them? If that would be difficult, I would be glad to send you my email address. I hope you can help and am looking forward to your future posts. Thanks.

 

Best,

Steve

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Hi Steve.

 

Thanks for looking in to my log, and for pointing out the corrupt files.

 

I have edited the entry from December 23:rd, hopefully you will be able to see the pictures now.

 

I hope your work with the Smuggler progresses well, would you mind posting a picture of your work so far? You are welcome to do so in my log if you like.

 

Best regards.

/Alfons

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Thanks Alfons,

 

The pictures came through just great. I'll see what I can do about posting where I've gotten to so far. I'm not much of a photographer these days, but my wife has a nice digital camera and I'll see what I can do. It's probably a good idea for me to learn how take and post pictures. After having put down the build for about 5 years I'm extremely committed to finishing. Buy going through this site with a fine tooth comb, I'm beginning to see that what I saw as an insurmountable hurdle (masts & rigging) can be handled if you take a deep breath, plan ahead, and take one step at a time. Thanks again for your inspiration and I hope I'll be able to get some photos up this weekend.

 

Best,

Steve

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Hi Alphons,

 

I have been working steadily to clean up my shop and move ahead with finishing the Smuggler. It has been uncovered in the basement for about 7 years and has gotten quite dirty. Any ideas other than water to clean it up? I've blown all the dust off with my compressor. I've been thinking of Naptha since it removes grease and dirt with out dissolving finishes. I'm also thinking about repainting the deck and the deck furniture. The deck and roofs I had previously painted a buff color which is pretty insipid. I figure nows the time to make changes if I want to. My plan is to finish the cleaning and painting, build the masts, spars, gaffs, and booms and then attach the desk furniture. If I've got the order wrong please tell me. I'm still working on figuring the camera and when I do post some pics.

 

Best,

Steve

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Steve. I'm sorry to say that I cant offer you any advice related to cleaning of your model. I have no experience of this what so ever. Try to place a post in the forum section about painting, and someone with more experience perhaps can give you some advice. As for the assembly order you plan to use, I am thinking to use the same.

 

Michael. Thanks for your kind words.

 

/Alfons

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Hi Alfons,

 

How did you make the sheves for the jib boom? I'm think I can cut a small section of dowelling and wrap the circumference with a sliver of copper tape, but your's are very cool.

 

Best,

Steve

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