Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I picked up this kit second hand and thought it would provide lots of fun and challenge.  Although it is no longer available from Model Expo there are 4 or 5 build logs here on MSW.  

IMG_0894.jpg.316fe9c67b26e450cd6b85192f891a16.jpg

 

IMG_0895.jpg.de768d28244568db871f21c7ce44b389.jpg

The PdN is also the subject of a book by Philip Reed - Period Ship Modelmaking - An Illustrated Masterclass.

IMG_0893.jpg.1cdf27aacb9a558deada2fb12f729afb.jpg

I'll dispense with the kit contents photos as you can find them on other build logs.

 

Wish me luck - I think I can use it!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The keel and the bulkheads are solid basswood 3/16” thick for keel, 1/8” for bulkheads. Nicely laser cut and easy to remove keel.  (It left lots of spare stock for the proxxon saw!)

 

The bulkheads were not quite as easy to remove from sheets and feel delicate. No fairing guides burned into o them as there are in the Syren kit.

 

Delicate is a good word for the bulkheads - I'm trying to be very careful but I ripped one onto the floor and and split in half - it was one of the bulkheads with an extra mast cutout so there wasn't much wood holding the two halves together - I had to drop that one!

 

Most of the bulkhead positions on the keel require a very light filing to take the bulkheads snugly but not bind them - broke another bulkhead before I got that right.  Only a few slots were not deep enough to make the bulkheads flush with the top of the false keel.

IMG_0821.jpg.37b04d99167fb9cb136123256d6f873b.jpg

 

The false keel has cutouts for the masts.

IMG_0823.jpg.21bb4017dfbc36d512f68762926b01dd.jpg

 

 All in all it was quite a pleasure installing the bulkheads.

IMG_0824.jpg.af8ebbf90b18c8736290586a3dc6bccb.jpg

IMG_0825.jpg.6687ec5cc8aedf6b747bbf03c831068f.jpg

 

IMG_0826.jpg.b0a8e43974ebb6ea450d9088b62c839b.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the look of the hull to come!  But I've learned how much work I'll have to do to prepare the bulkheads for planking.  And yet these bulkheads are so delicate!  I know - why don't I put spacer between them to strengthen them!

 

So I started cutting spacers - I have the saw for it now so it seemed like the right answer.  And the model maker seem to create only 2 different gaps  between bulkheads 1" and 5/8" (US model - imperial measurements!)

 

IMG_0867.jpg.8cfe3bc0c8c77b83bb535ddde5a37f69.jpg

 

But wait a minute!   I've learned that is is a good idea to read/think/plan ahead.  Since I tend to forget things pretty quickly that means re-reading instructions to remind myself what's coming.  The instructions make a point of how the deckplate has an integral role in positioning the bulkhead extension in the correct spot.  But my spacers are making the bulkheads more rigid to prevent them snapping - I wonder if there'll be a conflict.  So I better check out the deckplate.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks nice and straight.  Good start.  The beauty of wood is that any breaks can easily be fixed with glue.  I had a good chuckle when you said you ripped one to the floor, the one with the least amount of wood.  It's like dropping a buttered piece of toast, it always lands butter side down.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Riccardo1966

looks like a very attractive ship, and you don't truly own something 'till you've broken it ;).

Good start, will tag along if I may.

Cheers Richard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome all.  

 

Richard, I expect I will "own" lots of parts of the kit before long. (see my next post for an example)

30 minutes ago, Worldway said:

That looks nice and straight.  Good start.  The beauty of wood is that any breaks can easily be fixed with glue.  I had a good chuckle when you said you ripped one to the floor, the one with the least amount of wood.  It's like dropping a buttered piece of toast, it always lands butter side down.

That's why I keep the floor so clean!  Now if only I had w rubber floor in the shipyard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The deckplate!  

 

Popped right out of the the laser cut sheet but boy is it thin - only 1/32".  Delicate.

 

IMG_0900.jpg.396d359018dfd45405b2daa5fb66407e.jpg

 

The last deckplate I had to deal with was twice as thick and 4 times as robust!

 

A couple of easy breaks:

IMG_0902.jpg.1e42514063d9c96c4a099c502deb8c83.jpg

 

IMG_0896.jpg.4769a35e928516aeb2b3bf3fcb787f05.jpg

 

The alignment of the bulkheads wasn't too bad!  Every bulkhead cut needed a bit of trimming - every one was too tight.

 

IMG_0903.jpg.1cbb0e49ef3f4e079879c8b37d356a82.jpg

 

With a little work I discovered the advantage of thin deckplates - it bends:

 

IMG_0908.jpg.d925bdf6f52766ccf9e0ccc45711b50a.jpg

 

IMG_0906.jpg.bff11536a87f94bc547e650ab0dc8e6a.jpg

 

Unfortunately the cuts aren't deep enough  - and of course the deckplate is a bit delicate:

 

IMG_0910.jpg.d9053888ae138991347cbf4015eb68a1.jpg

 

IMG_0911.jpg.86a224ae87dc0197ab3351123819802b.jpg

 

Back to thinking about how to proceed - drat.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some progress on the deckplate.  I was tired of the thin basswood snapping off small sections so I strengthened the bow end (where it is most fragile).

IMG_0913.jpg.e4e96576fb3048d61c172c599ea6e722.jpg

 

To eliminate the excessive camber I had to lengthen almost all the cutouts for the bulkhead extensions.  I found the easiest way was to use dividers to get the length between a pair of extensions,

IMG_0915.jpg.d57697148e9398f87fbd44c9b630b6ed.jpg

 

then check the deckplate 

IMG_0914.jpg.4ba919837564e316d23c5a74e7a7df04.jpg

 

and trim it back as required - using the dividers on the deckplate to make sure that it was balanced on both sides of the centreline.

 

Refitting the deckplate (and snapping a bit more basswood where the fit of the extension was still a smidgen too tight!) and voila - deckplate fits!

 

Lesson learned:  rather than fix one tight spot and hope that will be enough to get by, be consistent and thorough - measure and then fix.  

IMG_0918.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug, I was just wondering about the deck if it the wrong one provided from ModelExpo.

You should send that picture to their customer service and ask them to check other kits.

They might have sent the wrong deck piece to you.

 

Edit: Is there any popcorn available as I pulling up a seat, I need to follow this build.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, tigoe said:

Pulling up a seat. The deckplate and the gunport strips will cause problems. If I had that part of the build to do over again, I would not use them.

 

- TIgoe

Hi Tim, Welcome aboard.  

 

You mention problems with deckplate and gunport strips.  I've read over your log (and the few other PdN logs available) looking for a heads up on problems I may encounter.  Saw you mention the deckplate but not the gunports themselves in your build. (unless it is the interesting discussion on carronades ...).  Any specific advice about fitting the gunport strips?

 

Great to see you back to your Prince as well!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Nirvana said:

Doug, I was just wondering about the deck if it the wrong one provided from ModelExpo.

You should send that picture to their customer service and ask them to check other kits.

They might have sent the wrong deck piece to you.

 

Edit: Is there any popcorn available as I pulling up a seat, I need to follow this build.

Nirvana,  Happy to have you join.  Buttered and salted?? Help yourself!

 

I don't think there is a problem with the deckplate sent with the kit - everything lines up too well in other regards.  I might have avoided the snapped off bits if I were just a bit less impatient and heavy handed.  I'm using this new hobby as way to alter my "natural inclinations". Hopin' this old dog can learn a few new tricks.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would avoid using the gun port strips. Rather, I would take the port locations off the plan and frame them in with square 1/8" stock. You will get a much better result.

 

My gunport strips were very stiff, and did not flex well to the hull as I moved aft. Since the PdN was on of the first ships I ever started, in my inexperience I forced and CA glued them into place leading to a variable result.

 

That is why my PdN still is not finished, because I use is a reminder to the mistakes I made from either inexperienced or rushing. I putter on the ship now and I will finish it, but the many ships I have built since I started the PdN have taught me that planning, process and execution must always be approached in a thoughtful, methodical manner. 

I also am following Philip Reed. You will find if you use the gunport strip, your Gunades trucks will fit. If you decide to create sleds and turn them into Carronades sleds you will need to lower the sill height in relation to the sheer.

 

I hope that helps.

 

Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Heronguy said:

Nirvana,  Happy to have you join.  Buttered and salted?? Help yourself!

 

I don't think there is a problem with the deckplate sent with the kit - everything lines up too well in other regards.  I might have avoided the snapped off bits if I were just a bit less impatient and heavy handed.  I'm using this new hobby as way to alter my "natural inclinations". Hopin' this old dog can learn a few new tricks.

 

 

One of the problems is this is a discontinued kit for Expo, not sure you would be able to get a replacement. Or more importantly, if you did -- if it would garner a different result.

 

- Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Tim.  Yes, that explains it.  I must admit to admiring your depth of interest and research into the ships you build.  I'm so new to model building in general, and ships in particular, that I lean heavily on the instructions and on advice from others.  I can (ok, have -  if I'm honest) get myself into corners by making adjustments to the directions given to make change that made sense to me without really understanding the consequences.  I'm wary of that now but hoping as experience accumulates I'll avoid some of those mistakes.  My ultimate goal for the models I've started is not so much to have display pieces as it is to develop some new skills, learn a bit about these beasts that sailed,  and convince my kids and friends that I'm not the complete klutz I seem to be :D!

 

All said - I appreciate advice and/or constructive criticism!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it is going to go quite a bit more slowly now Joshua.  Lots of fairing, figuring out the gun ports (did you notice Tim's suggestion?), all that planking ...  I expect you'll be onto the rigging before I catch up!  Though I'd be pleased if we ended up working in tandem at some point - two heads better than one.

 

Keep working on the house - once my local spring comes it will get me away from my "shipyard".

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug,

I wish you the best as you continue on this model. I think it is a beautiful model and worth finishing even if it does have some frustrations. I regret not having bought the kit when it was available as i think it is a great looking ship.

 

I think I'll follow along as long as you keep the posts going. Thanks for sharing.

Walt

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Walt, I was was lucky enough to pick this up from an estate sale - you may find one someday too!

 

As your signature line says:

Patience, patience; slow and easy makes the model.

 

So I will whittle away at the stern blocks and they'll be done when they're done.  It is a bit cathartic to vent occasionally though!

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I know the feeling all too well, Doug. I can only pass along the old joke about the famous sculptor who, when asked how he managed to create such exquisite mythological figures, replied, "Well, I start out with sharp tools and the best Italian marble, then remove everything that doesn't look like a goddess." Hang in there!

 I've built the Prince twice now, though that was many years ago, and it has always been a personal favorite subject. I wish now that I had bought an extra. I'd love to have another go at building this sleek privateer but the few offerings I could find on the net were prohibitively priced. Guess I'll have to settle for being a "voyeur shipwright" and enjoy watching your progress from afar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Preliminary results.

 

The file was useless (partly I think because I have to cradle the hull in a pillow to prevent breaking it so the pressure on the file isn't applied to the wood)

The razor saw is awkward and can't make deep cuts without binding.

The sand paper is very slow at removing material - I'll us it for final shaping and smoothing.

X-acto knife - ok but not great.

 

And the winner is La La ...  oops I mean the flexcut carving knife!  Now I just have to hope the stern block end up  looking like a bit of hull and not like a duck's head.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't look at a picture of a duck while you're cutting away.

I take it the blocks are already glued in?  I did blocks on my Niagara model by marking the bulkhead shape on the front surface and the top (deck) shape from the deck, then cut that much off with a coping saw.  It gives you some parameters.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point about the duck's head Joel!  I'll get a picture of the PdN in front of me.

 

I tried marking the block and planning the cutting before glueing but I don't have any particularly effective way to hold the block while sawing - no decent bench vise or clamping surface.  Also I have pretty poor 3D visualization skills to confidently get much material off the block even if I could hold it.  This is my 2nd (ever) attempt at shaping a block  and I blamed my  original problems on "concrete wood".  However this stuff was about the same - no excuse there.

 

The good news is that the carving knife is really working well and I can probably finish the rough shaping in a hour as long the I can limit the blood loss through my thumb.  It seem carvers have cute little leather thumb guards!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a pair of cut resistant gloves on Amazon for less than $20.  I believe, but don't quote me on this, that they are Kevlar.  I do a lot of cooking and on occasion have ran a knife into my thumb or finger.  Because my knives are very sharp they tend to go in deep.  With these gloves, the knife doesn't penetrate at all.  Maybe something to consider.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Doug,

 

Looking real good, totally agree regarding fairing the blocks. I just spent the weekend with band aids on my thumb. Not that I'm much of an othority on this but I am finding that a pillow and various blocks of wood with coarse sandpaper the best assurance to a nice hull. It's taking a lot of time and patience, trying to keep it all in one piece is key. All in all it's pretty relaxing when you just take your time..... Hey there's my new signature....

 

Keep up the good work....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...