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Schooner Halifax by rafine - FINISHED - Lumberyard - 1:48 - semi-scratch


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As I mentioned near the end of my Granado build, I have chosen to do the the colonial schooner Halifax as my next project. There are several reasons for this choice. To begin with, my age (77) and the diminishing capabilities of my hands and eyes are a major factor. I don't wish to start any project that I have doubts that I could complete. While the journey may be very important, I still like to see a finished product. This ruled out anything that is likely to take multiple years to build. I also have concluded that It will be better to do small vessels in a larger scale, rather than a larger ship in a smaller scale. I was very intrigued by the new Marisstella kit for the barque Stefano, but decided against it because it is a large ,complex ship in a smaller scale and would likely take at least two years to do.

 

In considering what to do, there were any number of possible choices, but the Lumberyard Halifax seemed to fit the criteria best. It is a true plank on frame model of a small vessel in 1:48 scale, which I really liked. Unlike the usual Lumberyard timbering set, the Halifax is offered in a version where the framing is laser cut. This was appealing to me because I have no power tools, other than a Dremel, and have no desire to hand cut all of the framing for a fully framed model. It also offers the opportunity for considerable scratch building and choice of presentation style, both of which are important to me.

 

I have chosen to post this build as a kit, rather than a scratch build because of the laser cut framing, and have labeled it as "semi-scratch", whatever that may mean. I have received the package from the Lumberyard in the past few days and am clearing away my work area and getting ready to start. Progress and photos will begin soon. I'm looking forward to the interaction and exchange that always accompanies a build on MSW.

 

Bob

 

 

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5 minutes ago, rafine said:

As I mentioned near the end of my Granado build, I have chosen to do the the colonial schooner Halifax as my next project. There are several reasons for this choice. To begin with, my age (77) and the diminishing capabilities of my hands and eyes are a major factor. I don't wish to start any project that I have doubts that I could complete. While the journey may be very important, I still like to see a finished product. This ruled out anything that is likely to take multiple years to build. I also have concluded that It will be better to do small vessels in a larger scale, rather than a larger ship in a smaller scale. I was very intrigued by the new Marisstella kit for the barque Stefano, but decided against it because it is a large ,complex ship in a smaller scale and would likely take at least two years to do.

 

In considering what to do, there were any number of possible choices, but the Lumberyard Halifax seemed to fit the criteria best. It is a true plank on frame model of a small vessel in 1:48 scale, which I really liked. Unlike the usual Lumberyard timbering set, the Halifax is offered in a version where the framing is laser cut. This was appealing to me because I have no power tools, other than a Dremel, and have no desire to hand cut all of the framing for a fully framed model. It also offers the opportunity for considerable scratch building and choice of presentation style, both of which are important to me.

 

I have chosen to post this build as a kit, rather than a scratch build because of the laser cut framing, and have labeled it as "semi-scratch", whatever that may mean. I have received the package from the Lumberyard in the past few days and am clearing away my work area and getting ready to start. Progress and photos will begin soon. I'm looking forward to the interaction and exchange that always accompanies a build on MSW.

 

Bob

 

 

I`m wishing you a "happy keellaying" session Bob,

have fun preparing your Halifax...

 

Nils

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Bob,

 

    I have the same kit.  I wanted to do a Hahn, have plans for a couple different models, but was reluctant to start.  The idea of the pre-cut futtocks appealed to me.  Dave suggested he was going to put together a practicum to assist in this construction, but I have not seen it.  One issue I have (and I will be watching to see how you deal with it) is how to properly connect each futtock to come up with the complete frame.  I have some ideas, but...

 

    I have the Hahn "Colonial Schooners" book as well as a couple articles, but they deal with using the blanks.

 

    I shall pull up a chair and watch your progress.

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Welcome aboard to all. I'm looking forward to the pleasure of all your company in the months ahead.

 

John, some people are just more optimistic than others.  :D

 

Chuck, the frames are double and should go together in a straight forward way. We'll soon see.

 

Bob

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2 hours ago, rafine said:

Welcome aboard to all. I'm looking forward to the pleasure of all your company in the months ahead.

 

John, some people are just more optimistic than others.  :D

 

Chuck, the frames are double and should go together in a straight forward way. We'll soon see.

 

Bob

In theory, you use a frame template as a guide.  The first layer of futtocks are placed...possibly glued to the paper.  The second layer is added and a heavy flat object is placed on it to keep the assembly together and keep it flat.  My experience is that when you place the heavy object, one or more of the top pieces can slide slightly, screwing up the frame.  Unlike when building a frame blank (using the regular Hahn method), there is no room for error here. :default_wallbash:

 

    Good luck!!!!!

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Once again, welcome aboard to all. your interest is always appreciated.

 

A few words about what I received from the Lumberyard, and about the direction that I intend to take. To begin with, this is a build using Hahn plans (included in the package), and the Hahn upside down construction method (a laser cut framing jig is included). The package contains laser cut framing pieces, including the keel, stem, stern post, rudder, keelson and frame futtocks. I ordered all of that in boxwood. There are various other laser cut pieces such as deck beams. I also got a sheet with laser cut pieces for the stern transom windows and carvings and the quarter badges and windows. The package also contains a good deal of sheet and strip wood in boxwood, pear and some other woods for planking and other purposes. In general, the laser cutting appears to be very good and the strip and sheet looks good, but not as smoothly finished as that from Crown. One potential problem looms. The jig and the keel assembly ( which I have put together) don't match the drawings in length. They do, however, exactly match up to one another. Hopefully, this means that the construction will proceed without difficulty, although yielding a model slightly longer than that shown in the drawings.

 

I have obtained a copy of Hahn's book "The Colonial Schooner 1763- 1775" to assist in construction. It is my present intention to plank both sides from the wales up and to leave the lower hull unplanned, although I may decide to fully plank one side of the lower hull. I intend to detail the interior of the hull, with lower decking, partitions, etc. Upper decking will be left partially open to allow a view of the lower interior.

 

I am attaching a photo of the jig, a rather poor photo of the package contents and a photo of the assembled keel. It's now time to get to work on the frames.

 

Bob

 

 

 

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...door bangs...dishevelled Aussie stumbles in.....pant, pant, puff, puff.......

 

Whew! Just made it in time for a front row seat. I see Sjors has the popcorn set up already and no doubt Mark will be along shortly to run the bar. This is going to be a real treat! Pour me a beer when you get here would you please Mark?

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Grant, there will always be a front row seat for you.:)

 

Michael, I originally received the resin parts, but remembered that they used to do laser cut wood and asked Ev at Lumberyard if they still had them.

 

Glad to have you aboard, Anja and Steve.

 

Good question Mark. The frame parts seem to match up to the drawings, so it's hard to know where the problem lies or how it will impact the build.

 

Bob

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Time to get started on the frames. I've settled on the following procedure for doing them: 

1) Remove the 9 parts for a frame from the laser sheet

2) Remove the laser char from the joints between futtocks

3) Using double sided clear tape, attach one layer of parts to the plan sheet for that frame, with the joints glued

4) Glue the second layer of futtocks on top of the first

5) Sand the faces of the frame until there is a fit to both the keel and the jig

6) Fill any joints, as necessary, with filler made of sanding sawdust and glue

7) Use strip wood to make any adjustment necessary to the keel notch on the frame

8) do some preliminary fairing to both the outside and inside edges of the frame

9) Treenail the futtock joints using the "drill and fill" method

10) Apply Wipe-on poly to the faces of the frame

11) Glue the frame into the appropriate jig notch using clamps to hold it in place and a straight edge to keep it square

12) Use the keel to insure proper fit and spacing after each pair is set at opposite ends

 

I've completed two pairs of frames now and so far, so good. The good news has been that using the laser cut pieces is a whole lot easier than cutting them all out by hand. The parts also fit the drawings fairly well. The not so good news is the amount of work necessary to get a snug fit  to the keel. Also, as I feared, the frame drawings and parts don't match up to the jig exactly, causing some need for further tweaks. All in all, I'm pretty satisfied with how it's going to this point.

 

Bob

 

 

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