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rafine

Schooner Halifax by rafine - FINISHED - Lumberyard - 1:48 - semi-scratch

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Thanks so much Zappto. Yes, I used Micro Krystal Klear. It is very easy to use. You just dip a tooth pick in it and then swirl the toothpick in the window frame opening until it it is filled. Each pane is done individually.

 

Bob

 

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Once again, some rainy weather led to extra modeling time. I accomplished a few things.

 

 First, image and mounted the rudder. The basic piece was the laser cut part from the kit. I had to add a piece to the upper portion to enable a proper fit through the deck. I then shaped the fore sideband tapered the aft side. The pintles and gudgeons were done with black painted paper (I avoid metal work whenever possible) with blackened brass for the working parts. The tiller was cut from boxwood sheet and rounded where appropriate. It was then attached to the rudder after the rudder was mounted. 

 

I then started making and mounting the various timber heads. These were made from boxwood strip, shaped with files, painted black and mounted to the cap rail with pins and glue.

 

Lastly, while access was still easy, I started drilling holes for, and mounting eyebolts for future rigging attachment, including the aft most guns.Many others remain to be done. I also added a black wire horse for the boom sheet, on the inner transom.

 

Bob

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On ‎10‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 5:48 AM, rafine said:

Work on the outer hull began with the quarter badges. As with the transom, i needed to make a decision as to how to handle the carvings. My answer was essentially the same; I couldn't make my own; I couldn't use the laser cut carving pieces from the Lumberyard; so I had to use the resin castings from the kit. To use them, I first cut out the windows from the castings and then painted them to mach the hull wood, with a bit of black background. I liked the paint better than what I had done on the transom, so I did some repainting on the transom to try and match. The windows are, again, the Lumberyard laser cut ones, again thinned down considerably. The glazing is again Micro Kristal Klear.

 

I then made up the main channels from boxwood strip, painted them black and glued and pinned them in place.

 

Lastly, I started to add moldings to the hull sides, The lowest is half round and the others are a simple double bead. All of the moldings will be painted black. The moldings were simple to place because when planking the hull I had used base pieces for the moldings in the planking and was able to just follow those base pieces when attaching the final molding pieces.

 

Bob

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Where di you get those carvings?

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Rich, the Lumberyard kit included cast resin (3D printed?) pieces for the transom and the quarter badges. These included the carvings. I cut away the carvings and discarded the rest of those pieces. I then painted them to match the hull wood.

 

Bob

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This week's work finished up the aft portion of the outer hull. This included doing the quarter deck rail, the swivel gun pedestals and the remaining hull molding in that area.

 

The largest part of the work was done on the rail, which was a complex task. I'm sorry that I didn't do any construction sequence photos, but the process was as follows: A piece of boxwood strip for the rail was bent to shape to match the cap rail and its edges sanded round; pieces of square boxwood strip were cut to length for the rail stanchions and holes were drilled in both ends of each for brass pins; holes were drilled in the cap rail for the mounting pins;  beginning with the forward most stanchion, each stanchion was fitted into it's hole in the caprail and then the railing was fitted above it and a hole drilled through the railing for the upper pin; the stanchions were then glued and pinned to the railing in turn, making sure that the full assembly fit as each stanchion was added: when the assembly was complete on each side of the hull, they were painted black and then glued into the caprails as units; the stern end rail was made up and fitted after the side rails were in place. I chose to use pins at both top and bottom of each stanchion because I expect some rigging to be tied off to the rails, creating stress that glue alone wouldn't take care of.

 

The next work was to make up and mount the six swivel gun pedestals. This was straightforward, involving cutting boxwood strip to length, filing them to hexagonal shape, drilling mounting holes for the guns in the pedestal tops, finishing them with wipe-on poly and black paint and gluing them in place.

 

The last work was to fill in the moldings, which required cutting and fitting the prepainted molding pieces.

 

Bob

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Dear Bob

 

Beautiful work!  I am hacking my way through my own build on this site, and one aspect I have been dreading is the pintles/gudgeons.  I have the rudder (3 actually....just in case I need spares!) ready, but try as I might, using copper stripping seems to be a lost cause - but then again, I have no good experience as this is my first wood ship build.  I am very interested in how you prepared and mounted your pintles/gudgeons using paper.  If you would, any response would be helpful since I would like to follow a 'paper' path to mounting my rudder as well - since it seems to be the path of least resistance. 

 

Best

Patrick

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Thanks so much Patrick. Unfortunately, I have no photos of the process I use, so I'll try to explain. First, I will admit that what I do is not "correct", but merely an attempt to create the impression of proper pintles and gudgeons. Age has caused me to resort to some tricks. For the pintles, I begin by gluing an "L" shaped piece of wire into a hole drilled in the rudder. Next, I glue a piece of black painted thin card to the rudder so that it hides the horizontal portion of the wire. For the gudgeons, I glue the black painted card to the stern post and then add an eyebolt in a hole drilled through the card. At small scales, this seems sufficient to fool the eye into seeing a seemingly proper rudder mounting. 

 

Bob

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Moving forward along the hull, from midship toward the bow, I've added a variety of items. These include the fore channels, additional hull moldings and various sizes and shapes of timber heads. I've also added eyebolts for gun tackles and  rigging attachment to the interior, as a matter of convenience at this point (holes were also drilled for  the breeching ropes but the ringbolts won't be added until the guns are done).

 

The various timber heads were all made up from boxwood strip. They were fully shaped with files on the strip wood stick before being cut off to length, brass pins added, painted black and then mounted in holes drilled in the caprail. The last attached photo is an overall shot that shows the work on the hull to date.

 

Well, there seems to be no escaping the fact that it's time to do the headwork (always my least favorite part of a build), so that will be the next order of business.

 

Bob

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