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rafine

Schooner Halifax by rafine - FINISHED - Lumberyard - 1:48 - semi-scratch

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Work on the head is now complete. It was the pain that it always seems to be, but there is also a sense of accomplishment. At he risk of boring you all, I will go through it on a step by step basis, with photos of each successive phase.

 

I began with the cheeks. These were each done as laminations of two pieces cut from thin boxwood sheet, then sanded on their facing edges before being glued together and then final fitted to the hull. Card templates were used to get the initial shape.

 

Once the cheeks were in place, I made up the main rails. These too are made as laminations from thicker boxwood sheet, using card templates. After lamination, each rail was sanded to their tapered shape. The timber head shape was then filed into the upper end. The rails were then final fitted to the hull and glued into place.

 

 At this point, I chose to make and add the upper molding and then the knight heads and timber heads at the bow. These were filed to shape from two sizes of boxwood strip, painted black and then pinned and glued in place.

 

Next were the head timbers, which were made from boxwood strip and fitted,, with what seemed like endless trial and error, until they fit between the main rails and the cheeks.

 

The next, and possibly the most difficult, task was to do the cathead supports and the lower rails .These were done in segments. The first segment was the lower rail, which was made from boxwood strip bent to shape and fitted between the stem and the hull and glued in place to the head timbers. Then came the most difficult piece in the process, the cathead supports. These were first cut from thick boxwood sheet, using card templates, and then filed and sand to shape. This was a task, since they had to fit the hull contours, as well as the angles of the catheads and match up to the position, size and shape of the lower rails. I found it necessary to use very small filler pieces of strip to mate the two segments.

 

I the added the final pieces of the lower hull molding at the bow and between the fore channels and the cathead supports.

 

The last item was to paint the 3D printed resin figurehead from the kit and glue it into place.

 

Bob

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OK Bob, it's all your fault. I have been enjoying your Halifax build so much that I went ahead and did something really silly. I ordered the kit. I know I'm not ready for it yet but want it on the shelf for when I am. Yours has been such an inspiration. 

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On 1-10-2017 at 1:43 AM, Robin Lous said:

So beautiful and so crisp and clean. 

 

Robin :)

I was wondering if I said this before.

Yep! I did!  ...and I stick to that! absolutely gorgeous. I hope I can learn from this. Every little bit I can pick up from your build is a leap forward for me.

 

Robin :)

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Thanks so much Hamilton, Al, Thomas and Robin for the very kind words, and thanks also to the "likes".

 

Al, I'm really gratified that you have decided to do Halifax based on my work. I don't think that it's silly at all, and you will enjoy the challenge. I look forward to watching.

 

Bob

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17 hours ago, alde said:

OK Bob, it's all your fault. I have been enjoying your Halifax build so much that I went ahead and did something really silly. I ordered the kit. I know I'm not ready for it yet but want it on the shelf for when I am. Yours has been such an inspiration. 

Ahem, where did you order the kit, good sir? I asume it is not the Halifax from Constructo you are talking about...

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Bob,

 

When I ordered my Halifax kit they told me they were no longer offering the laser cut stern details because they no longer have the service of the more delicate laser cutter. They now only have the resin parts. How is the quality of the resin castings? I'm sure they will be fine but I may try carving my own with the resin as a backup.

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Al, as it turned out, I used only the windows from the laser cut sheet. I found the laser cut carvings far too fragile for my clumsy efforts. I wasn't happy with the one piece resin stern casting, so  I ended up using the laser cut windows (thinned considerably), cut the carvings from the resin casting, discarded what remained of the casting and scratch built the stern. I did use the resin quarter badges, with the windows cut out and replaced by the laser cut pieces. I'm sure that I could have used the castings virtually "as is", but I enjoyed doing the scratch stern.

 

Bob

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Hi Bob -- I'm just starting the head on my Fly, and seeing your work here has solved one of the first problems:  I never thought of laminating!  And I have just been baffled over cutting the big curves of the cheeks that cross the grain no matter how they're lined up.  Plus, your nice sanding of the outer edge takes care of the task of decorative molding.  Wonderful.  Now if I can only get a few days off from work, maybe I'll get it done.  And maybe if I do it a dozen times, I can get something almost as nice as your work.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Thanks so much Martin.The grain is a problem, no matter how you do it. I have to tell you that I broke more than one piece. I've used the lamination technique in a number of ways, and find it very useful.

 

Bob

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I was hesitant posting a comment......you have so many already that voiced my sentiment ;)    I follow that rule...grain is everything.   used in your favor,  you can get the wood to bend,   creating a nice curved appearance.   but there are the times that it cannot be helped,  and it makes the part very brittle ;)    your lamination approach is really neat too........I'll have to file that one away  :)     really wonderful work Bob.......if I'm quiet,  don't be concerned....it's because I'm speechless  ;) 

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I've now done the deadeyes and chains. Fortunately, there aren't that many.

 

The chains consist of three parts: the deadeye straps, which are made from wire; the middle links, which are made from wire bent to loop shape using a simple jig made from two small nails in a block of wood; and the lower links, for which I used brass backing links that I had on hand from some past project. The deadeyes are also commercial products that I had on hand.

 

This work completes the work on the outer hull. I am now returning to do the remaining deck furniture and fittings.

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Hi Bob, she is all looking great. I was wondering about your deadeye strap technique, and how it is done. Do you wrap the deadeye with wire, give it a twist, push both ends through the channel, cut one end off then make a loop? How is the loop fixed, solder, glue or is it just left? Thanks

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