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rafine

Schooner Halifax by rafine - FINISHED - Lumberyard - 1:48 - semi-scratch

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Thanks so much OC and the "likes".

 

As far as a next build, I really don't know what I'm going to do. I made a resolution before starting Halifax to try and stay with larger scale builds of smaller vessels. Age (78) and diminishing physical skills drove this decision. I'm not sure what builds that I want to do will fit that description. On the other hand, I'm really intrigued by the Marisstella Barque Stefano, which is exactly the opposite of my resolution. We'll have to see, when the time comes to make a decision. OC, I built a Victory many years ago and have no interest in doing another.

 

Bob

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Ratlines completed. The good news: ratlines are not really that hard to do once you get in the rhythm of tying clove hitches; I only have to do them about once a year; Halifax has ratlines only on it's lower shrouds and has only three shrouds per side on each of it's two masts, thereby cutting down the number of knots to be tied. The bad news: doing ratlines is undoubtedly the most tedious, boring and annoying task on any build.

 

Having said all that, they are now done and attention can be turned to the spars and running rigging.

 

Bob

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I started off the week by making the gaff and two yards for the foremast. I then mounted and rigged the gaff and did the rigging for the headsails.

 

The gaff was made from a dowel, tapered and shaped at both ends. Cleats were added, made from strip wood. The jaws were cut from strip and shaped to fit the mast .The parrel is made from beads strung on a piece of wire and glued into holes in the jaws after mounting (not correct, but a good simulation and the best I can do at this point). None of the gaff rigging is finally tensioned or permanently tied off at this time. 

 

The plans show rigging for a forestay sail and a jib, and reflect the halyards and downhauls, and those are what I've done. As with the gaff rigging, these lines are not finally tensioned or permanently tied off.

 

Next up will be mounting and rigging the two foremast yards.

 

Bob

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Thanks so much Al, Denis and the "likes.

 

Al, ironically, I have had some issues that have kept me from playing golf and forced me to work more on my shipbuilding. If it's not bad for you, push yourself a little. I've found that the modeling has kept me from getting even crazier than usual.:P

 

Bob

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4 hours ago, rafine said:

Thanks so much Al, Denis and the "likes.

 

Al, ironically, I have had some issues that have kept me from playing golf and forced me to work more on my shipbuilding. If it's not bad for you, push yourself a little. I've found that the modeling has kept me from getting even crazier than usual.:P

 

Bob

Bob, I will for sure take your advice. It's something I love and it keeps my mind off  the pain though that's not too bad right now. I have that Halifax kit calling my name but she has to wait in line just a while longer.

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I've completed, mounted, and partially rigged the fore lower and topmast yards. 

 

The lower yard does not have a sail (at least as shown on the plan) and was given foot ropes, blocks for the topsail sheets, blocks for the lifts, a truss and a sling. The sling contains two bullseyes and a lanyard. The topmast yard has foot ropes, lifts, a parrel, a halyard and topsail clew blocks. The parrel was made using beads and trucks shaped from 1/32" boxwood strip. To shape the trucks, I lightly glued six pieces of strip in a stack, shaped them with files, drilled two holes, and then separated them with alcohol.

 

After mounting the yards on their mast pins, I partially completed their rigging. I tied off the truss, sling and parrel and then I did the lifts and the topsail halyard, clews and sheets and bowlines. I didn't finish these lines because, in my haphazard fashion, I had run out of needed blocks, which are now on the way to me. I also didn't do the braces for either yard, because I believe them to be best added later.

 

I'm now working on the main gaff and boom, while waiting for the delivery.

 

Bob

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