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Is any one besides me going to be following the America' Cup 35th defense?  Did you watch the last defense in San Fransisco in 2013?  What's your thought's of the catamaran winged boats?  Do you think they are an abomination or did they save America's Cup from extinction and bring some excitement back into the sport?  

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Soon they won't have sails but a vertical adaptable wing all computerized with no need for sailors on board but some drone-geek.

The audience will shift from sailors to droners.

 

Time to switch the Tele off and go back to modelling our fine sailing ship. Arrr!

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I have been following the America's Cup races since the early '50's when, with my father on one of his boats, we I watched the Weatherly practicing in western Long Island Sound near the Stepping Stones Light (now shutdown). I had continued to follow the boats and series until Dennis Conner wrecked the series with his "I know better than anyone else' attitude and defied the intent of the Deed of Gift when he raced the cat against the large Kiwi sloop and claimed it was a "fair" contest.  From that point the cats took over, and most sailors of traditional sailboats (monohulls) lost interest. The cat type boats have no relationship to what they have always sailed. The judge presiding over the later lawsuit seems to have decided the case on the basis of what was good for San Diego, not the intent of the Deed of Gift or it's traditions.

 

It was Dennis and his syndicate's "win at any cost &to hell with sportsmanship" attitude that started the Cup Races on their down hill spiral.  I will admit that they needed a better racing boat than the 12 meters, and the AC class actually would have provided that had the marine architects not gone looking for all the loopholes and designed a boat too flimsy to survive ocean racing and broke in half-- fortunately not killing any sailors.  Progress like that the Sport of sailboat racing didn't need.  Neither did it need the ridiculous costs where the boom costs somewhat north of $500,000 and the resultant crass commercialism to pay the bills!

 

As one who has been sailing for 60 plus years and loves the sport and activity--racing, cruising or day-sailing, and I've done them all, I have no intention of following this most recent series.  The race, all of you who are old enough will remember, used to be a National Sport and the hulls, equipment, and sailors all had to come from the challenging country. Unfortunately that has passed too, further lessening the interest.

 

If they go back to monohulls and I live long enough, I may rekindle my interest in the Cup Series;  until then I'll enjoy mono-hulls with the rest of my brethren sailing traditional boats with no regrets what-so-ever!

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Now that's a man who knows his America's Cup!  I've been following AC since the Ted Turner Days and attended the races when it was first lost to the Aussies with the secret wing keel at Newport in "83.   I agree with you Jim about the disconnect with the traditional AC and deed of trust although I like the fact that sail racing in general is creating such interest and major network coverage, and, I have to admit I like watching the fast boats - but I just like watching boats and boat racing no matter what kind they are!!! 

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My favorite quote about the America's cup was after the court ruled against Conner, but before he won on appeal.  One of the news guys said:

 

"Dennis Conner is the only man to lose the cup twice - once to better sailors, and once to better lawyers."

 

I miss the days when it was economically feasible for a dozen teams to mount a challenge, but I have to admit I watched the last cup races with rapt attention.

 

 

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I'm not sure why some people think the Cup should be immune to what is 'normal' in racing, which is that people will absolutely push the envelope of technology and the rules in order to win.  It is no different than Formula 1 in this regard, where the teams will spend metric truckloads of money to come up with ways around, between, or under the rules, in order to win.


I certainly get the downside as the cars (or boats) move away from what we are familiar with, but that is why different racing classes exist, so that the old cars (boats) can race amongst each other while the modern boats continue to move ahead in both technology and speed.

 

I find it quite amazing how fast the modern cup boats go, and while I love the older mono-hull boats for their appearance and grace, as long as there are no rules disallowing them, the cats and new technology will be developed and used to win the race.

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Its all very interesting. However the boats should be kept to their own classifications,much like auto racing. Shouldn't have go-karts racing against Formula ones. Should pay strict attention to hull form and sail area and leave the contest to sailing skills.

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1 hour ago, reklein said:

Its all very interesting. However the boats should be kept to their own classifications,much like auto racing. Shouldn't have go-karts racing against Formula ones. Should pay strict attention to hull form and sail area and leave the contest to sailing skills.

 

What you want is for the Cup to become just like every other sailboat racing class in the world, but there are thousands of them already if that is your thing.

 

What is unique about the cup is that it has always been a 'build a boat that can beat us' sort of a challenge.  The sailing skills are of course necessary, but it's almost always been won by the latest innovative design built to beat the other guys, so the transformation from monohull to catamaran to foil has just been an ongoing (although perhaps the most jarring) development in a long line of sailing evolution.

 

The entire reason the cup is not run annually or on some other regular basis is that it is only held when someone comes up with a boat that they feel can win, and issues a challenge to the cup-holder.  In 162 years it's been challenged 35 times, and a couple of times there were 20 years between challenges.

 

I love that the cup is strange and unique like this, and if it was turned into just another spec-race, of which there are already thousands held around the world every year, it would lose all of it's uniqueness and just become another one of many, albeit with a different prize, and a great history which would be burned on the alter of 'rules' by stopping progress and innovation.

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How true. its all about innovation!

It would lose the uniqueness that comes with only being raced whenever appropriate.

I have watched quite a lot of the Cup over the years & enjoyed it, no matter what they race in whether it be monohull, catamaran or both at the same time.

 

It going to be interesting how Team NZ go with their pedal power!

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Question... I'm not close follower of the Cup.  More of a random observer.  Did they ever outlaw the microgrooved coatings that were being used at one point the hulls and everything underwater?  I remember there was a large stink raised over it when one team started using them.   It supposedly changed the laminar flow of the water and end result was the hull was slipperier.

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Couldn't really find much on that. All I got is this;

"In the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and 1987 America’s Cup, 3M riblets were applied to 10 U.S. boats, which presumably helped to secure victories."

&..

"Observation of dermal denticles of shark skin took to the first application of riblets on the hull of the winner of the 1987 America’s Cup yacht race, the Star and Stripes."

Can anybody else comment on it?

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Stability and streamlining according to the commentators. The desired attitude is bow down, and windward hull down apparently. Not sure why, they ddin't expalin that bit. I have to say I miss the old style cup with monohulss, where seamanship and true sailing skills were on display - spinnakers blowing out, and crew members going up the mast to free jammed halyards - all that kind of thing. Having said that, I find the new style racing tremendously exciting, and compulsive vieweing. But it ain't sailing

 

Cheers!

Michael

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As Brian said above there are plenty of regular "class" boat races all over the world all the time.  I really like that this is contested only infrequently.  I like that the tech aspect is pushed to the limit and there is always "new" things being tried (catamarans, wings, hydrofoils, bicycles instead of grinding posts etc).  The races have been very engaging.  Even the extreme low speed one earlier today where they couldn't even get the boats up on the foils for most of the race. 

 

I also like the old school boats just as much but for different reasons.

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I am following the races too, it's amazing how technology has change sailing to the extreme.

But born in the mid-60, has only sailed mono-hull all through my life I have a hard to imaging sailing those formula one catamarans.

This is more my style of racing.

BeatriceAurore_D72.jpg

 

 

 

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Well it is the same challenger as in 2013.  New Zealand.   Who remembers that last time; USA was 5 points behind and it looked bad for USA Team Oracle but they rallied and they won the next 6 in a row to successfully defend the cup.  Any guesses how this one will pan out?

 

The more the cup races change the more they stay the same.  It's still big money pushing the designated envelope to go faster than the other boat.  Been that way since the beginning.      

03158-pictures-ships-frigates-centuries-old-paintings.jpg.259df7dd88bb9d2548b726fa6a8f9bb7.jpg

 

03161-pictures-ships-frigates-centuries-old-paintings.jpg

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18 hours ago, VACorsair said:

Well it is the same challenger as in 2013.  New Zealand.   Who remembers that last time; USA was 5 points behind and it looked bad for USA Team Oracle but they rallied and they won the next 6 in a row to successfully defend the cup.  Any guesses how this one will pan out?

 

The more the cup races change the more they stay the same.  It's still big money pushing the designated envelope to go faster than the other boat.  Been that way since the beginning.      

03158-pictures-ships-frigates-centuries-old-paintings.jpg.259df7dd88bb9d2548b726fa6a8f9bb7.jpg

 

03161-pictures-ships-frigates-centuries-old-paintings.jpg

03164-pictures-ships-frigates-centuries-old-paintings.jpg

Thanks for sharing those beautiful pictures VACorsair,

 

Nils

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1 hour ago, Nirvana said:

Oracle nerds three straight wins, to stay in the game. One loss and it's all over.

Nirvana,

 

How does that work?  These AC points rules confuse me.  NLZ has four wins but only 3 points because Oracle won in the challenger series (which is confusing enough).  There are 12 matches total so it would seem it is the best out of 12 (7 wins).   why does USA have to win the next 3 straight in a row? what am I missing? 

 

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