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Tigersteve

English Pinnace by Tigersteve - FINISHED - Model Shipways

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You know I had a thought on that. Fortunately most of it is rectangular strips of some form. I was thinking maybe a paper cutter, you know one of those guillotine types that just chops. It might take some work to line up the cut but it would be perfectly smooth from end to end.

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Oarlocks are virtually completed. Very delicate work. I followed Chuck’s method of filing and shaping from a longer 3/32” strip. For the vertical pieces I used a 1/16” x 1/32” strip since I did not have 1/32” x 1/32” in maple. After these were glued I sanded them down to the correct scale.

 

The below photo shows a dry fit. Undecided if these will be painted.  Any thoughts? They still need to be cleaned up a bit. 

Steve

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Progress so far on the finishing touches. I turned a tiller with a similar profile to the tiller on Chuck’s Royal Barge. I may leave the color scheme or paint it completely red.

 

The rudder was tapered using pinstripe tape as a guide and the flying transom was crafted out of maple and painted red on both sides, leaving natural wood around the edges.

 

The oar handles were turned using my rotary tool. Again, like turning with a hand drill, a perfect lathe is difficult to achieve. I believe I have a satisfactory set. Oar blades will be shaped out of the 5/16” wide strips shown in the photo below. Oars will be painted completely red. 

 

I cut a 1/16” wide strip out of a .010” thick black styrene sheet to simulate the ironwork at the bow and rudder. I will be using iron oxide brown weathering powder to create the metal effects.

 

Finally, I created a display board using scrap basswood and the remains of a 1/16” thick maple sheet. The sheet was glued on top. It needs to be sanded flush and the entire board surrounded with 5/16” wide maple strips to finish it off. 

Steve

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“Ironwork” completed. The black styrene and weathering powder worked out great. Of course, everything was crisp and clean until gluing the wire with CA to simulate the bolts. Everything was sanded prior to weathering and applying Testor’s dull coat. I applied this with a small brush. 

 

The strap at the stern was redone three times. At that point, there was no drilling back into the boat to insert the wire (bolts) because some wire was left in the wood. This would prevent new holes from being drilled. I will approach this process differently in my next project. 

 

The rudder is dry fit at this point until the boat is mounted on pedestals. Back to working on the display board and oars. 

Steve

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Edited by Tigersteve

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Thanks everyone! I’m feeling much better about this update. I used tiny nailheads from my Mayflower kit to simulate the bolts for the “iron” strap at the stern. The nailheads were clipped and glued onto the strap upside down. This allowed me to grip them with tweezers for their placement. Afterwards, they were sanded flush, painted black, and weathering powder applied.

Steve 

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The completed oars rest on the display board, which still needs to be drilled and finished. This was difficult to properly photograph. I’m not sure if I’ll add the boat hook as it looks a bit busy when the oars are stowed in the boat.

 

The boat will be mounted on two 1/16” thick brass tubes inserted into the display board. I was considering blackening them, but I think I’ll leave them as is. The tubes will be cut in 2” lengths. Any advice on this procdure? Cutting disk on the rotary tool or razor saw?

Steve

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At the start of this project I had a different plan for the presentation. Holes were never drilled into the keel from the start. Drilling them with the boat on your lap is not recommended. It worked fairly well though. 

 

Dry fitting reveals holes not drilled perfectly vertical. I opened up the diameter of the holes slightly so everything can be leveled during installation. I’m hoping I can use wood glue for these bonds so I have enough time to adjust the fit. I might cut the brass tubes from 2” to 1 1/2”. The boat is sitting a bit high for my taste. 

 

Is it a mistake to use wood glue for this installation? I really need the open time to make leveling adjustments. 

Steve

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Edited by Tigersteve

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Just about finished up with this project. The rudder and flying transom were installed. The flying transom was tricky to install as you can imagine. The rudder should fit more tightly against the stern, but I had trouble with the fit earlier on and decided to accept it. The brass tubes used to mount the boat were cut down to 1 1/2” and CA was necessary to create the bond for the brass and the display board. After I create the boat hook I will take the final photos.

Steve

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Edited by Tigersteve

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Very happy to close up this project! The boat hook was made with a strip of maple lathed with my rotary tool. I used some wire from the kit to make the hook. I was going to add the grapnel hook and had even made a ring for it with some wire, but the line from the kit was unusable so I tossed that idea as I did not want to invest more money into this project. 

 

Some final thoughts and again I will compare this kit with the longboat kit. Both challenging kits for sure. I think the planking on the Pinnace is more difficult due to the length and curves of the hull. Additionally, you must plank inboard. 

 

I enjoyed making the modifications such as the panelled supports under the seats and the longboard that runs down the center of the boat. Looking back, I wish I had added the stretchers for the rowers. I think that would have been another nice touch. I decided to leave out the splash guard panels as well. 

 

Just for kicks I took the longboat out of its case to take a group photo. Thank you everyone for your interest, likes, and support throughout what was probably the slowest build of the English Pinnace. 

Steve

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Edited by Tigersteve

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Thank you everyone for the compliments. Working out the dimensions for a case if I decide to go that route: the base is 9” x 2” and the model height is roughly 3”. Case dimensions would be 13” x 6” and 5” tall. This leaves roughly 2” breathing room around the model. The case would be acrylic like the one for the longboat, but the base would be black.

Steve

Edited by Tigersteve

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