Jump to content

To use full length planks or not. (EDIT BY MOD)


Recommended Posts

As the subject says

 

100ft planks were not available (and still aren't :P ) when the models that most of us build were actually produced in real life

 

Here's my question to the hardcore builders and those with oodles of knowledge. 


Why do most use builders full length planks (as supplied by kit for example) to plank their hulls and not shorter more "scale lenghts"? - (and obviously shown the tree nails etc)

 

This may have been discussed before but I could find no particular reference

 

Would be interesting to hear the opinions/advice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am really in 2 minds as to the path I want to follow on my current build

 

On the one side, the use of "scale" planks appeals to me and on the other, wanting to make the model look good

 

Pete - I did use the "scale" length planks on the deck - its now the hull I need to do and hence the quandry. And thanks for the guide on butts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mary1.JPG.ce95cff687da384c1f83455338e56e0a.JPG

Here is an example of something I am working on.

 

I think it depends on the model, and the desired effect. 

 

I like a wood finish rather than paint, and with this in mind, using various ( scale? ) plank lengths, creates an interesting look, that might not be as

effective when painting.


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Gregory

 

I too am a natural man :) - love the look of natural wood

 

Something tells me that the darker wood for a hull is the way to go. The lighter wood tends to show imperfections too easily

 

My current build has the hull painted which I am not to keen on [its my build :P]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, ctclock said:

As the subject says

 

100ft planks were not available (and still aren't :P ) when the models that most of us build were actually produced in real life

 

Why do most use builders full length planks (as supplied by kit for example) to plank their hulls and not shorter more "scale lenghts"? - (and obviously shown the tree nails etc)

 

    I'm not sure "most" do use full length planks.  Looking at build logs, I see many new modelers using the full length planks on the double plank kits, but I see more seasoned modelers going the "scale length" route.

 

    Personally, I will use a full length plank at least once on either side, BUT will score it to make artificial butt ends.  This gives me a good, continuous, even run along the entire length of the model and allows all the following strakes to set up properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

    I'm not sure "most" do use full length planks.  Looking at build logs, I see many new modelers using the full length planks on the double plank kits, but I see more seasoned modelers going the "scale length" route.

 

    Personally, I will use a full length plank at least once on either side, BUT will score it to make artificial butt ends.  This gives me a good, continuous, even run along the entire length of the model and allows all the following strakes to set up properly.

That makes sense Chuck - thanks for the feedback!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I gather using full length planks has the advantage of making it easier to get clean strakes and hence to look neater on a model. Whether this is prototype-fashion is another question in addition to the scale plank length. The problem is to get the butting ends aligned properly. Perhaps the best way is to fit a full length plank and then to cut it into shorter sections before attaching it. This ensures that the planks have exactly the same wiidth at the butt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 17.5.2017 at 5:34 PM, Pete Jaquith said:

Jeremy,

 

I prefer to use scale length planks and it helps in the shaped areas of your hull.  I have attached a table of plank butts and pictures from my "Fair American" build.

 

Pete

image0065.jpg

Very nicely done the curved planks!

Marking the positions of the butts is the best way to do, but be aware, the frames of the kits are usually not in the right positions!

 

You can see on the sketch, that the beams  - and therefore the butts - go through the scuttles. Like this the cargo would go not downwards. The position of the beams are always in front and back of the scuttles, or better saying in real life the scuttles follow the beams underneath.

 

Deck-beams.jpg[/img]

 

 

 

XXXDAn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hi folks

Just looked in on this.

For what it's worth, the approach I have taken to this issue is to soften a plank of full length and pin it in place. I let this dry overnight. Then I take it off and cut the pre-bent plank into planks of around 30 scale feet (in the early 19th century on the US east coast they were cutting planks up to 40 ft - this will differ in different locations and different times). To cut the planks I use some little nippers which give the plank butts a very slight shamfer. Clearly when the pieces are butted together they fit perfectly.

 

Hope this is of interest.

 

Best wishes all

Don

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Planks in real ships were not always a "fixed" length. It varied from ship to ship and was dependent mostly on the length of available timbers. I wouldn't be surprised to find different lengths of planks in the same ship. That said, I always use 120mm length planks in my planking jobs, especially on decks. 120 mm is a very approximate length of planks at almost any scale. Besides, 120 can be divided exactly by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 which facilitates some calculations when needed. :)

My 2 cents :)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
On 19/05/2017 at 9:38 AM, wefalck said:

I gather using full length planks has the advantage of making it easier to get clean strakes and hence to look neater on a model. Whether this is prototype-fashion is another question in addition to the scale plank length. The problem is to get the butting ends aligned properly. Perhaps the best way is to fit a full length plank and then to cut it into shorter sections before attaching it. This ensures that the planks have exactly the same wiidth at the butt.

I agree with this, of course, but why making it extra difficult by cutting the planks, while scoring them would give a safer butt joint and will look exactly the same?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 1st wooden ship has long single strips for the 2nd planking.

 

The 2nd ship I used 4 different lengths, staggered.  The longest plank is a scale 10 meters (about 33').  This is on a 1:50 model.

 

So, from the deck on down to the keel, the plank run is every 4 layers, redundant.  I like the look, and the difficult bends were easier too, my opinion.

 

Plus, there are no very short planks to compensate.  I like the look, and the overall planking ordeal went a lot smoother and fluidly than the 'single plank method'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...