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michel saunier

SOLEIL ROYAL 1669 by michel saunier

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In fact I wanted, challenged by my MMB forum friends, to create a quet that approximates that of the SR. These parquet floors are called "Versailles". So I created a block of alternate wood slats and then grinded into the milling machine, in several layers to get what you see. Then sawing of lamellae of this block, finishing each one (thickness 5 / 0th of mm), assembly and gluing on a thick paper to the dimensions of the piece, finally the assembly glued on the bridge.

 

I am quite satisfied with the result that, alas, we will not see any more because the aft fellow comes to hide everything.

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IMG_1879.JPG

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Hello Cedric and thank you for compliments
The Grace Harbor document perfectly corresponds to the structure of the Royal Sun. And since the estimate made by Etienne Hubac of the refit of the SR confirms it little doubt is permitted. The date of the refit of the SR is well confirmed elsewhere by the Intendant Desclouzeaux in its relations with Colbert and Colbert de Seignelay. And it corresponds well to the survey of Le Havre de Grace.
However, as Hubac built the Queen before the SR, it is possible that he adopted the same framework for both.
I would be happy to discuss it with you.
cordially
Michel

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We'll look a little bit at the accessories. Many are repetitive and represent a work almost to the chain. Hints or tips to avoid this hassle.

The 16 upper and lower hats of the portholes of the fellows. They are the result of milling of a bar in general shape, then at the end sculpture with the scalpel and needle files, finally sawing, thickness by sanding back, and we start again.

The 15 sets of the third battery ports. Getting quasi perfect circles would be very long, and as I am old and slow then let's be crazy, work with the techniques of our time. So a draft in CNC milling machine (a friend of mine knows how to do this, thank you Luc) and pick up the scenery and needle files.

For the nailing of the pre-pleats on each chord, like the finer one of the vertical wall above, there is no way to do otherwise by working by hand. 2000 nails with orange head in three dimensions on the three pairs of pre-wires, one pierces, one sticks, next! ! !
And for the nails of 0.6 without brass head hardens, more than 3000, one drills, one engages the clamp that cuts flush. Needless to say, we have to do this on a virgin wall of all scenery and then sanding the whole.

I do not show the wall studded because one sees almost the nails that the nose on it.

 

But the result of these punishments is there too.

 

For the portholes is another story
See you soon

Chapeau de sabord de 8.jpg

Décor des sabords de 8.jpg

Décor dessabords de 12.jpg

cloutage.jpg

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Dessin des sabords de 12.jpg

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Let's talk a little about the portholes of the first two batteries.
There are 30 of them. These mantles are made of two layers of curling (of the wall) crisscrossed and studded. In principle there are about 100 nails per mantelet. I have somewhat reduced the number for convenience. On the inside of the mantles was painted a fleur-de-lis in yellow from Naples. Despite my multiple attempts the result was not convincing, so I decided to make these Lilies carved in yellow boxwood. They are 5/10 th thick in the center and less than 2 to 3/10 in the edges.
The hinges and hinges are made of blackened brass as well as the closing rings. The rope which one does not see and which is behind crosses the wall and runs along the leases of the upper deck. This is called an Itague.

 

On either side of the port of the iron rods with washer and key run through the wall to have at their end hooks or loop which serve to ammarate the hoist of the guns. This set took great stroke of time and patience to be Built.

 

On the last photograph we can see all the device for ammaring the cannons, the brague which crosses the shield and which is used to brake the recoil of the barrel during firing, the two hoists which bring the barrel once loaded to the wall, The corner of sight with its handle to adjust the inclination of the barrel.
We even guess the canons of the second bridge.

IMG_237Mantelet de sabord fleur de lys.jpg

itague de sabord.jpg

Canons 3ème pont.jpg

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hello michel,

happy to see you here!

he world is contenplating your masterpiece and now not only our french forum

to see the picture is beautifull but when i saw the real model at séné was a real experience.

welcome here.

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Hi Michel

 

I just joined your fan club and congratulate your professional work.  I look forward to seeing your work continue in such spectacular fashion.   I love the lost wax cast cannon, especially the cascabels!

 

Allan

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I return to you after an absence due to holidays and other occupations in my large property.
I resume construction these days on the prow with the manufacture of herpes as well as their decors.
I know I'm not going very fast but it's a pastime passion and not work on the chain. The opposite will be a constraint.
Thank you, Mario, for your compliments.
So very soon for new photos of the progress of the work
cordially
Michel

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Terrific shaping on those headrails, Michel.  It would seem that the figurehead angel will be added to the seahorse as a separate ornament, and then the scrolls of the headrails will nestle behind the angel's wings.  What is your plan for attaching all parts to each other: pins and epoxy, or just glue of some sort?

Edited by Hubac'sHistorian

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The piece is simply made in a plank of boxwood, then perforated with the scroll saw and the milling machine. Finishing of the openings with needle files. The part that folds down on the side of the vessel has been arched to form has hot air.

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Michel, I just read through your build and I am deeply amazed at the work you are doing! Just incredible! I will be following along closely as you are an inspiration to me for my own work.

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Hello Michel,

I have been watching your building on the Internet for some time.
I am glad that you are here now in MSW.
Your model is fantastic.

Edited by archjofo

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Lovely work, Michel. Even more impressive is the fact that the blank is just one piece. I seem to recall M. Frolich built his up of several pieces (perhaps to insure the best wood grain orientation).

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Thank you, but Frölich followed the plan of J. Boudriot. In fact, it is a mistake because the timber flows of the time did not allow this cutting.It should have done 3 or 4 pieces. I made the bet to make it in one piece for convenience reasons in the shapes because the high ear plate on the wall and is therefore arched in both directions. On the other hand if I slip it is damn ... but repairable without it shows.

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