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Here are the last of my maritime models and, in keeping with my different style of building, they're all half hulls.    I like this format as it can be hung on a wall so I don't have to answer that awkward question from my wife ... "And where do you intend to put THAT".   Well, it's an easier discussion! 

 
First up is a model of our own boat, an Alberg 37, which we've since sold.   Ever since I took up scratch building I had intended to build this once I developed enough skills to reproduce it and, more importantly, all the metalwork.
 
The hull is carved out of a block of Renshape and is at a 3/4" scale.
 
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Here are a few of the details I scratch built from salvaged metals.
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I've had some questions asked earlier about tools so I'll digress here for a moment.   My "lathe" at the time  was a hobbyist wood lathe with a 3 jaw chuck, a tool rest and I used cheap Chinese carving chisels which I would grind to custom shapes as needed.  
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In the picture above I've got a chuck that I salvaged from a hand drill mounted into the 3 jaw chuck.   This is my preferred setup when making tiny pieces as it gets your fingers away from the deadly, hard, spinning 3 jaws.    
 
  Even though I now have a "proper" metal lathe I miss the flexibility offered by hand held tools.   Anyone considering a metal lathe might want to keep in mind that all the turned metal pieces you can see  e.g.steering binnacles and winches, were made by a hand held tool and are considerably more difficult (for me) to make with a metal lathe.   
 
OK ... moving on.
 
Next up is up is our previous boat ... a Thunderbird 26. These are plywood hulls built to a Canadian design. On the real boat I removed the cabin and cockpit when I bought it and built a totally new cabin so if anyone thinks it doesn't look like a T-Bird ... that's why. I made this simple, smaller model (13") for one of our sons who was very fond of the boat as a child.   Carved from Renshape.
 
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Cockpit details mostly fabricated using Arborite/Formica samples.  My wife can be very indecisive when we go to a hardware store to pick out a colour for the new kitchen so the salesman is always happy to load us up with lots of samples!    These are great for flat surfaces because of their perfect flatness, square and strong.
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CONTESSA 26's ... Two of them.
 
Our friends who owned it had split up and they both wanted one.    Both are 12" (maybe 13") models.
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The original is shaped as usual from Renshape
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I made a fiberglass mould from the first hull to save same time.
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then used auto-body repair paste (Bondo) to make the duplicate.
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Both friends are happy with their souvenir ... but still apart.
 
BENETEAU 51 IDYLLE
 
This yacht was owned by friends who have it in the charter business in the Caribbean.    
 
The real one ...
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The hull was fashioned from Renshape (mostly) and generous applications of fiberglass paste and Bondo ... needs must.    My stash was getting very low so I was cobbling together all the biggest bits to create the mass I needed.   She wasn't a pretty baby.
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But with generous dollops of Bondo and my power sanders I soon had a suitable shape ...
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It is "close" to 1/2":1' scale but definitely built to scale.
 
I'll just put in couple of shots of the build ...
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I won't bore you with all the fabrication that was required but if anyone wants to see how pieces were made ... let me know.    LOTS of pictures available.
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Thanks for looking in ...
 
Frank
 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Omega1234 said:

Hi Frank

 

Your models are simply fantastic!  Talk about beautifully finished, beautifully detailed and beautifully crafted.

 

I'm a fan!

 

Cheers

 

Patricj

Hi Patrick 

 

Thanks for your interest.   A fan you say!!    So, do I have to start a fan club?    Should we have jackets?    Can I charge membership?

 

I've already commented on your insanely small projects and have just read through your J-boat ... holey moley they're so tiny and so crammed with all the innards!   Do you live in a telephone booth by any chance?;)

 

Actually, you've got me thinking ... I'm about to take the half-hull of our own old Alberg 37 back to the shop for updates and I've always had an urge to do the entire interior so ... if you can do it in a 7" model it should be a piece of cake right?

 

Maybe you'd like to do it for me?

 

Cheers mate.

 

Frank

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14 minutes ago, KeithAug said:

Frank.

 

Very nice. Well worth posting. Looking forward to seeing more.

Hi Keith 

 

Thanks for looking in and taking the time to comment.   I'm still feeling a bit of a fish-out-of-water here as my modelling direction seems so different to anything else I've seen so far.   In all my scratch building I get the most satisfaction from the process ... how can I make that and what can I make it from?   That sometimes means I don't always spend as much time getting obscure details just so.   e.g. my wire wheels on a car might not have the correct number of spokes ... that kind of thing.   It's a worthwhile objective and I truly admire builders like yourself and some others I've seen here who can strive for that level of perfection and have the skills to get it.   Your Altair is just a fabulous piece of ... modelling doesn't do it justice ... a combination of art and engineering.    Truly inspiring work Keith.   I see you had an appropriate background too so that helps.    I was a computer geek now going on 80 and I've got so much to learn and so many models I want to finish!!

 

Cheers

 

Frank

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Frank

 

You shouldn't have any concerns about your models. Most of us do it for our own pleasure and the key criteria is to make something that pleases oneself. It is seldom the case that model makers achieve absolute accuracy and lack of information often constrains many of us to make something that looks about right. The degree of accuracy also comes down to personal choice. So my advice is to do it your way, you will be surprised how others at MSW appreciate whatever you choose to build.

 

Thank you for looking at my builds, it's always good to get positive feedback.

 

 

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Hi Frank

 

Thanks for the compliments about my J Class Rainbow.  In fact, it's modelling the internal accommodation of a boat that gives me the most satisfaction, so it's no surprise that I'd fully encourage you to do the same for your boat.

 

Furthermore, from what you've shown us so far, it should be a walk in the park for you to do.  Whatever you do, please don't forget to start a Build Log for us to enjoy and follow.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

 

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11 hours ago, Omega1234 said:

Hi Frank

 

Thanks for the compliments about my J Class Rainbow.  In fact, it's modelling the internal accommodation of a boat that gives me the most satisfaction, so it's no surprise that I'd fully encourage you to do the same for your boat.

 

Furthermore, from what you've shown us so far, it should be a walk in the park for you to do.  Whatever you do, please don't forget to start a Build Log for us to enjoy and follow.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

 

I'm not surprised Patrick that you enjoy doing the interiors ... why else would you tackle it eh?    It must give great pleasure to create such a miniature world.

 

As much as I'd (maybe) like to do it, just for the fun of it (I built almost all of the interior of the real boat), I know it would go back on the wall and nobody would (or could) ever see it.   Besides, the model is a solid mass of blocks and Bondo fillers under the skin and it would be a nightmare to hollow it out.  

 

Here's what's "behind the curtain".

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As it is I've got too many (car) projects in the mill so there's no point in starting this one.   Thanks for the encouragement though.    The cynical side of me says ... this guy just wants company in his Lilliputian world :D

 

I do have plans to rebuild a fair bit of the Alberg as the metalwork is starting to tarnish and its solder too.   I've switched to stainless steel rod and silver solder so that's the main focus and. yes, I will start a build log.

 

Frank

 

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Hi Frank

 

I see what you mean about the difficulty in retro-fitting the interior of your boat. That won't be easy. However, maybe you may be tempted to do another full hull with all of the interior in it?

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

 

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As a sailor and lover of small sail boats, I am in awe with your models. They are superb.

I also see that you are a collector of O scale British steam trains. O scale brass train is another one of my passion as well.

 

Please show us more pictures of your models and how you fabricate the metal parts.

 

Yves

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51 minutes ago, yvesvidal said:

As a sailor and lover of small sail boats, I am in awe with your models. They are superb.

I also see that you are a collector of O scale British steam trains. O scale brass train is another one of my passion as well.

 

Please show us more pictures of your models and how you fabricate the metal parts.

 

Yves

Hi Yves

 

Glad to hear you like my models ... thanks.    Actually. I don't collect brass steam trains ... so, apologies if I gave you that impression.   I did scratch build a display model of the British "Flying Scotsman" and am working on another but no brass locos.    AH!!  You probably got the idea from seeing Flying Scotsman in the background of one my photos?
 

As far as fabrication goes I did expand on this topic over on my Billings Dragon build and someone also asked me about some small parts here.

 

If there's something specific you're interested in I'd be pleased to help so just let me know.

 

I'm afraid I've already posted pictures of all the boats and half-hulls I've ever built (although many more pictures are available) and at present I'm back doing car models.

 

Cheers

 

Frank

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Frank, you are like Bernini, start with something that looks nothing like the finished result and end up with a masterpiece!  It's like the old saying: Get a block of granite and chip away everything that doesn't look like sailboat.  Easy peasy!  :rolleyes:  You do that amazingly well!

 

As a sailor, I appreciate your subjects.  I think I have sailing in my blood.  After we sold the last house we spent a while looking at live aboard sailboats.  We bought another house because it was more "practical" but houses don't get the emotions stirred up like sailing into a harbor at dawn after an overnight journey.

 

It was interesting to see you used a wood lathe to turn winches.  Up to this point I was believing only a metal lathe could accomplish that.  Thank you for the education. :) 

 

 

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30 minutes ago, Julie Mo said:

Frank, you are like Bernini, start with something that looks nothing like the finished result and end up with a masterpiece!  It's like the old saying: Get a block of granite and chip away everything that doesn't look like sailboat.  Easy peasy!  :rolleyes:  You do that amazingly well!

 

As a sailor, I appreciate your subjects.  I think I have sailing in my blood.  After we sold the last house we spent a while looking at live aboard sailboats.  We bought another house because it was more "practical" but houses don't get the emotions stirred up like sailing into a harbor at dawn after an overnight journey.

 

It was interesting to see you used a wood lathe to turn winches.  Up to this point I was believing only a metal lathe could accomplish that.  Thank you for the education. :) 

 

 

Hi Julie

 

Funny you should use that expression about "chipping away everything that ....".   I had used it on a car model that started as a block of mahogany and a viewer asked me how I did it and I said "just chip away .... not Ferrari".   I don't really know how it comes out (usually) correctly as I rarely have plans ... an eye for the correct line I suppose.   As I said I'm a retired computer geek with nothing in my background to build on.

 

Ah, sailing.  Retired at 55, sold everything, quit 2 good jobs, kicked out the last kid (23) and moved aboard the Alberg (top of this piece) then left for the Caribbean.   Stayed aboard 4 years then sailed back to Toronto and sold it.

 

Waking up here is what I called living ...

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Sigh ....

 

OK, sounds like you've seen what I said about using a wood lathe and, if you don't want to get into a "real" lathe this isn't a bad option.   There's a freedom of movement with a hand held chisel that you don't get with a metal lathe and that is often important with the kind of things you might want to shape.

 

 Frank

 

 

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Sigh is an understatement!   Memories of sailing completely melt me.  I raced for about three years but I'm a cruiser at heart.  We used to sail from Chicago to Mackinac Island every year for 8 years.  My dad would take the boat one way, I'd take it the other.  We took one sail from Lake Worth, FL to the Bahamas and back, and one trip from Ft. Lauderdale down into the Keys.  Not once did I want to go back to being landlocked but I always did.

 

As for the wood lathe, do high speed tools work on aluminum and brass or would you need something designed for turning metal?  

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Glad the picture meant something to you ... not everyone's cup 'o tea.    That was Pipe Creek in the Exumas and we stayed there almost a month.   What kind of boat did Dad have and ... have you done a model of it?

 

OK ... high speed tools, yes, I only use HSS blanks to make my tools for the machine lathe.   You don't need carbide to work aluminum or brass (but carbide cuts them nicely too).   As I said above I used to buy Chinese wood carving tools when I'd find them on sale then re-shape the heads using these disks you buy for Dremels if I needed a particular shape.

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e.g. to make the self-tailing slot on a winch I'd taper a carving tool to that shape.

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You'll find that HSS is actually what the better carving tools are made from.   Pry one out of its handle and you'll find the familiar square shape of an HSS blank.

 

Just curious but what colour of finish will your modern winches have .. black, silver or brass.   If black then maybe you could make them in wood or a composite and paint them.

 

Frank

 

 

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My dad had a 1973 Columbia 45.  Not the prettiest or fastest thing on the water but solid and comfortable.  I knew that boat inside and out.

 

As for winches, Lewmar has these for big boats:

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Maybe I could find a carbon fibre rod and turn something close.  

 

I found this RC Harken hardware on another site but the website that sells them is down.  I'd have fun rigging a J Class model with modern racing gear.

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All this makes me wish we bought the boat instead of the house. :(

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21 minutes ago, Julie Mo said:

My dad had a 1973 Columbia 45.  Not the prettiest or fastest thing on the water but solid and comfortable.  I knew that boat inside and out.

 

Maybe I could find a carbon fibre rod and turn something close.  

 

I found this RC Harken hardware on another site but the website that sells them is down.  I'd have fun rigging a J Class model with modern racing gear.

 

All this makes me wish we bought the boat instead of the house. :(

That's the site I saw many years ago and couldn't find now ... out of business huh?   Beautiful stuff they had.

 

I don't know if carbon fibre can be turned (probably) but there's lots of black plastics that could substitute.   Y'know, if you were to go with a plastic or something that soft you could use a drill press or even a drill (held in a vise?) as a "lathe" and cobble up some sort of tool rest and go at it.   If you're thinking of black winches then consider maybe using this new-fangled composite "wood" sold for decks and docks and paint them.

 

That's what I built the powerboat model with and it's interesting stuff ... uniform throughout, waterproof and dense (so it would take fine detailing).

 

Almost all of them have free samples.   

 

An alternative might be acrylic rods ... here on eBay

 

Frank

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Julie,

I'm not sure what you want to turn, but with a wood lathe, turning metal is problematical as far as getting good surfaces and holding dimensions.  

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5 hours ago, Julie Mo said:

I picked up a 1/2" aluminum rod the other day.  I'll set the lathe up and see how my turning tools work on aluminum.  This is from my last house but I have it only partially set up here and it's in the garage (HOT!)

 

That's a wonderful shop you had Julie ... truly envious.   My entire shop is 5 x 8' and my "workbench" is 3 x 2'.    Sure makes me stay tidy.

 

Can you fit a chuck on that lathe?  

You might find the rod a bit too hard but maybe not ... depends on the alloy.    I'm using an 8'  1/2" rod that I bought to make wire wheel parts and it IS hard.  I used to have great success making winches out of aluminum Exacto handles.   

 

Will you be using your wood lathe tools for this?    The smaller the chisel the more agile you can be.

 

Here's a few pics  of my setup and tools.    

My old chisel collection ... actually carving tools.

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I've said earlier that I salvaged a chuck out of a hand drill and it's great for getting small pieces away from the dangerous 3-jaws of the big one.    Here's a winch (ex-Exacto handle) in progress ...

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See ... it CAN be done.

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OK, feel free to ask any questions.   Good luck.

 

Frank

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I guess since enginuity is the key on this... I turned all the cannons on my Constellation from brass using a Dremel and some files.   Sometimes you just have to go for whatever works.  Necessity is he mother of invention after all.  

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3 hours ago, mtaylor said:

I guess since enginuity is the key on this... I turned all the cannons on my Constellation from brass using a Dremel and some files.   Sometimes you just have to go for whatever works.  Necessity is he mother of invention after all.  

Mark

 

Good to hear about the cannons!   Can you tell me how you did it?

 

Frank

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Wow!  That winch turned out beautiful, Frank!  Nice work!

 

Yes, I do have a chuck, which is designed to go at the other end for drilling into the center of a piece.  But I could secure it in the 3 jaw lathe chuck.  Never would have considered that without seeing you do it.  Thank you for the tip, Frank! :D

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19 hours ago, albergman said:

Mark

 

Good to hear about the cannons!   Can you tell me how you did it?

 

Frank

Frank,

I chucked them up, turned the Dremel to a speed I was comfortable with and then just used files and the plans. I wish I had pictures but turn them like you would on a lathe... from raw stock to a close shape then details and final dimensions.  After doing about two or so, you should find out what works best for you and the speed will pick up.

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Time for a bit of an update.   Been busy with mostly car projects for the past couple of years but now returning to do some much needed updates  on the half hull model of our own Alberg 37 sloop (since sold).    I mentioned at the beginning of this thread that I wasn't happy with  the metal work on this model as it was done back in the days when I was using plain steel rod and ordinary solder.   This has now tarnished and blackened so it's time to replace all that with stainless steel and S/S solder.

 

Have taken the model out to my shed and have it mounted on a work board which itself is screwed to a cabinet near my workbench.  This lets me easily reach the model while reducing its handling.

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It was pretty dirty after several years on the wall so after a wash down with Q-tips and soft, wetted rags I gave it a polish with the automotive stuff (Meguires polishing compound) I use on my car models.  Gave it a shine it never had.

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I've glued a couple chunks of Renshape together to give me a surface on which to build the new bow and stern pulpits.    Drilled a few holes where needed and start bending stainless rod to the shapes.   This rod is actually sold as stainless steel welding rods and is lovely to work with.   

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Solder in the extra rails then remove from the Ren.   File down the excess solder. wet sand it and finally polish with a metal polish.

 

Here's my 2 new rails ...

 

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There are tiny tabs that need to be added to the rails where the lifelines will attach.   These I cut from a tin can lid and soldered in place.   I use a large piece for ease of holding then grind it to size with a Dremel grinding disk.   Tabs seen here on the bow pulpit.

 

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That's about as far as I've got.   Need to make a few stanchions and the 2 special ones for the "gate".

 

Back later.

 

Frank

 

 

 

 

 

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