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Stuntflyer

The Hayling Hoy 1760 by Stuntflyer (Mike) - 1:48 scale

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I managed to complete the forecastle deck hook and the breast hook over the last few of days. Both of these required a lot of fiddling in order to get them to fit properly. The angle of their inside edges changes constantly due to the changing angle of the hawse pieces.

 

Bolt holes were drilled through the hooks with a #75 drill. 24 gauge copper wire was used for the bolts. The position of each hook was set prior to gluing and clamping with copper wire. The wire being inserted into three of the holes that were extended about 1/32" into the hawse pieces. After the glue was dry, copper wire was snipped to a pointed shape and pushed firmly into the holes with a needle nose plier. The wire was snipped off leaving about 1/64" showing. Using a wide flat-tip nail set, the remaining wire was pushed (not hammered) into the hole until flush. I was wondering if this method would aid in holding the hooks in place, so I made test piece without using glue. I found that I could not pull it apart easily. I would recommend using this method as it is easier to do and avoids using glue which can be messy. Thanks for the tip, druxey! Liver of Sulphur was diluted 10:1 and applied to the copper wire for blackening.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Mike, I don’t know if this has come up before, but what are you taking your pictures with (a camera duh....) but they are the sharpest, clearest pictures ever! Usually the pictures exaggerate a model’s faults, but darn there aren’t any, anywhere.  I’m beginning to like you less and less.

 

Seriously you set a very high standard.

 

 

Kurt

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Mark, Kurt and Michael, thank you for the kind words.

 

Kurt: I do all the photography under incandescent lighting (no flash) on a tripod with an 80A conversion filter on my Nikon D5100. The filter helps to reduce the orange tint created by the ambient light. Photo processing is typical and I rarely do any sharpening or cropping. Of course using a good macro lens helps tremendously.

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Well, I have finally completed the first of the the 21 square body frames. A temporary cross-spall was placed (tack glued) across the frame pair at the height of the top timber. It is cut to the width necessary to set the frame vertical. I used the cross-spall to level the frame across the ship by measuring at both ends vertical from the build board. A rubber band is all that was needed to hold everything in place after gluing.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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This is how I go about determining the height of the top timbers prior to attaching the cross-spall.

 

A printout is made of the frame drawing and reference lines are drawn. All of the the floors of these 21 frame pairs are notched 1/4" wide. Thus, a scrap piece of 1/4" wide boxwood is glued to the printout at the location indicated on the drawing.

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Simply place the floor side of the frame pair over the 1/4" boxwood piece and nudge the frame into position. Reference lines can then be drawn on the side of the frame at the top timber line. I find that the boxwood piece is like having an extra hand.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Sweet work, Mike. A major advantage of scoring the rising wood for the floor timbers is apparent in your model at this stage. Each frame is positively indexed on the keel and there is no chance of cumulative error while assembling the frames. Wish I had done that on my Swan class model. It would have actually made the framing process a lot easier.

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