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I used to have a Triton log, but it went down with the crash years ago.  My priority is to finish my Syren, but thought I'd post my old photos with a few comments.  I don't see a lot of POB logs on here, and suspect people considering the POB version might be hesitant due to the lack of logs, and mentions of a bulkhead which might be out of scale.

 

I've rescaled the plans to 1:64 which is my preferred scale.   The keel pieces are pear.  The photo shows a number of test pieces.

 

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I do remember having scale issues.  For those who are resizing their plans to a different scale, it's definitely a good idea to be careful.  I had to create an entirely new profile former due to printing the plans out incorrectly for the scale I chose.

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The difficult part about these particular bulkheads, is that if you cut them out to match the inside thicknesses of the templates, the tops of the bulkheads are very thin, and prone to breakage. This is alleviated by gluing scrap material to the ends of the bulkheads. In this case, basswood.

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This looks ghastly, but all of this will be covered with exterior wood later anyway.  Here, I'm going for accuracy and strength.  The stern "risers" have random pieces of basswood glued between them for strength.  The counter section also shows basswood pieces which have been inserted between the pieces from the actual templates, which have been sanded to shape.

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Photo of the inside before sanding.  There's a part of me that really enjoys having horrendous "innards" to my models, which are then covered up with planking.  You can see how much sanding needs to be done on the inside for a smooth surface.  I'm also cutting out the center pieces of the templates, and setting them on the tops of the bulkheads.  By doing so, it's really easy to see which inside aspects of each bulkhead need to be sanded.

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  • 4 weeks later...
18 hours ago, WBlakeny said:

Looks real promising.

I'd like to follow your build.

Welcome aboard!

 

 

18 hours ago, aviaamator said:

Good start! But I remain convinced that such beautiful ships we need to build a large scale!

I agree with you, but unfortunately for me, my spouse's tolerance for my hobby is inversely proportional to the size of my models. :) 

 

 

 

7 hours ago, AnobiumPunctatum said:

Nice to see you back in the Triton shipyard. Have a lot of fun with the project

Thanks Christian!  

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I thought I should show the steps I'm taking in order to mark out deck clamps, etc...   Especially if I'm doing anything wrong..  I've cut the templates to fit the insides of the hull, resting on top of each bulkhead.  I've also sanded the insides of the hull in order to match the contours of the templates.  I'm now transferring the template markings  onto the insides of the bulkheads accordingly.  I plan on running a plank along the deck clamp line from stem to stern to serve as a support for the deck beams.   I'll also be planking the inside of the hull up to the deck clamps to add strength. The hull is extremely fragile right now.   I believe I'll also need to lay down planking on top of the bulkheads in a few areas, which will be visible from a hatch or two. 

Triton - Templates - Internal.jpg

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Ok,  I believe I've found the offending bulkhead template.  I'd remembered there'd been a question regarding one of the POB Bulkhead templates before the server crash, but for the life of me couldn't remember the issue.    In the photos, you can see that the insides of bulkhead template 24 rest flush with the inside of the hull.  However bulkhead template 27 is FAR too wide.  I'd initially thought I'd just forgotten to resize down to 1:64 scale, so reprinted the template.  Unfortunately, that is the "correct" size.  If I were to widen the hull in back to accommodate the width of this template, I'd end up with a strange hull indeed.   In theory, since I have a smooth run along the hull all the way back to the transom (I still actually need to sand the area behind the last bulkhead MORE, I think the template is incorrect.  I'm extremely open to others' thoughts on this one.  

 

This is also the beauty of working on two ships at once.  When a snag is hit with one ship, you can move to the other build whilst resolving the issue with the first! 

 

Alan

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  • 2 weeks later...

Making a bit more progress here.  

 

The first pic shows planking up from the tops of the bulkheads to the deck clamping line.  I'd originally glued a single plank along the line, but have come back through and installed planking underneath in order to help with the strength of the hull as it's so fragile at this point.  It was fun to install planking in a fast/haphazard way knowing it won't be visible and that I still don't need to be careful about appearance yet.  The only thing that I'm concerned with at this point is stability/strength.  However the tops of the bulkheads in the middle will be a different story.  I'm thinking about using maple for the decking throughout, and the tops of the bulkheads will be a nice place to practice deck planking, as I've not planked a deck since 2008!  It also appears that the planking in the center could be somewhat visible if I leave the hatches off on the gundeck, etc, which I'm planning to do.  The tops of the bulkheads don't have a camber at all, but I'm thinking that's not a huge deal, and won't be discernible from above on this deck.

 

The second pic just shows the contour of the hull (stern still needs to be shaped as well as a few other areas) at this point and the beginning of the planking up from the keel (not installed yet, as I'm going to double plank this one).  Now that I have a number of planks installed on both sides from the keel up, I'm going to pretend that this is the "real" planking, and will practice shaping stealers, etc if they are required.  I've given myself different dimensions of space to work with on each side so the calculations will come out differently, giving me more practice, etc before I install the final outside planking.  Am still debating about what wood to use for the outside planking, but am considering a mahogany veneer.

 

Alan

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The decks templates have been printed to scale and taped to 1/32" plywood.  I then used my xacto to cut out sections, tracing their edges onto the plywood. The plywood has then been cut into quarters so it can be placed within the model.  I learned this method from Chuck.  The gundeck guide is complete with the exception of cutting out the hatches, so I'll now work on the lower deck.  I've already planked the sides of the hull where the lower deck will be seated (warning for future builders), so I'll have to sand the edges of it in order to obtain a proper fit, or remove that band of planking.  I'll probably cut/sand/shape that planking band just to ensure the deck fits precisely into the model, since I know the deck dimensions, etc are exact.  I'm also going to draw out the deck planking pattern onto the decks in order to make sure the planking is done correctly, and that deck features are installed in the proper locations.

 

I'm planning on placing an order for 1/16" Maple Strips from Woodprojectsource.com.  I'm planning on using Maple for the decking, and pear for the entirety of the rest.  The cross-sections have really been fun to peruse, as you can examine the woods other builders have used, and determine the look you desire.  For me, pear throughout is the most appealing.  

 

Alan

Plywood Decks.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've been whittling away at the internal "structural" planking back to the bulkheads in order to allow the deck templates to seat properly.  The midsection is fitting well on each side, but I do have a worry about the bow section. There is quite a gap from the edge of the template to the side (same for the other side).  The internal vertical bulkhead template fits well in this area, so I'm a bit confused. 

 

Alan

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Thanks Jason!  I'll definitely need to do some more template fitting in the bow area.  I think the next step will be to dry-fit the gundeck templates to see how well they match the curvature of the hull, and go from there.  Once the decks are installed, I'll probably go back into my old postings and make notes for others on what I should have and should not have done, in order to make the process easier for the next builders.  

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  • 4 weeks later...

It might seem funny, but I'm still pondering how the lower deck template is fitting on top of the bulkheads.   There really is a big gap in the bow area between the edges of the template and the hull; yet the front bow bulkhead template fits vertically within that section smoothly.  That bulkhead station really is supposed to be that wide.  I've compared the tops of the bulkhead templates to the drawings, and verified the tops of the bulkheads match the height of the lower deck.  I've test fit the gun deck templates in their estimated places, and they seem to fit very well.  The two decks align very well with each other as well.  

 

I printed out the plank-on-frame profile, and overlaid the POB profile on top, just to make sure I didn't have any issues there.  Everything lined up perfectly. Whew!  I was also able to verify that station "0" on both styles of builds were located in the same spot, as that's how I'm lining up the deck templates into the model.  

 

Edit: The card modelers among us will get a kick out of the top left section of my plan and water cup.

 

Alan

Template Alignment - 800x600.jpg

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Thanks Doc!

 

I've been perusing the POF logs, and it's clear that my bow section at and under the waterline needs to be far sharper.  This will bring the lower section of the hull in the bow area "back" to the lower deck template.  Unfortunately, this means I'm going to have to do a major restructuring up front;  I'm going to experiment a bit, and create my own hawse pieces from the POF plans and insert into the model.  I need to be quick about this however, as the weather outside is starting to get chilly, and my "sawdust" projects are always put on hold in the winter.  I'll get as much done on this one while the weather holds, and then move back to the Syren when it gets cold. :)

 

Alan

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  • 2 weeks later...

That looks fine, Alan!

Thank you very much for the advise.

 

I think I'll have to face the same problen at the gundeck's stemside end. Perhaps I'll cut the paperplan at the 5th bar from the stem and try to figure out the real shape with the aluminium foil glued on under sized plywood. Taking the Centerline and de sternside of the 5th bar as "borders" will give the rigth shape of the inner line of the hull and when I cut it from paaper I've got a shape for the cutting it from wood and redo the gundecks stemside end to my particular hull situation. (I've got this alu-idea from changing a T-34 tank  from Tamiya kit one's to its correct hul breadth.)

Hope this idea is a little help to you. 

 

Do you remember what size your rabbet-plank has had?

 

 

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Hi Heinrich,

 

Thank you for the tip!  I'll ponder that quite a bit. :)  

 

The planking I've installed so far from the keel up is just to help provide a smooth surface for the "final" planking.  (They are just 1/8" x 1/16" random strips of basswood). I don't have the keel attached yet, so the planks just end at the bottoms of the bulkheads.  Those planks will also be sanded down to almost nothing, in order for me to have a thin enough bottom for the keel to be installed against. 

 

If I had it to do over again, I don't think I would have installed all of the filler pieces between the bulkheads in the middle sections of the ship.  I'd thought that by doing so, I'd have a "perfectly" shaped ship to install the final planks upon, but there are just too many sections which aren't satisfactory. Since I'm intending on installing a very thin final veneer to the hull, I know that this thing is really going to need to be smooth!

 

Alan

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  • 1 month later...

Today was sanding day.  I'd installed additional "filler" blocks in the bow, and have been sanding the bow back to them. This has started to bring the bow section into alignment with the deck templates.  Below is a pic showing the templates quasi-sitting in position (I bumped the table before taking the pic, which threw things out of whack a bit, but you can see what I was doing).   By sticking a dowel straight down through the mast holes in each template, I was able to ensure the gun deck was in alignment with the lower deck, and to help me to be sure I was sanding the bow area back appropriately.  Before sanding, the deck templates were removed.

 

The funny thing in all of this is that if I'd been paying more attention to the bulkheads while sanding initially, I wouldn't have had to do this.  For some reason, I felt the bow was far more rounded than it really is, and shaped the bow filler blocks accordingly.  Wow, that was a major error.   Hopefully future POB'ers read this series of posts, and don't make this same error.  

 

Now I need to correct the bow shape on the next deck up!  Time to cut out another template.....

 

Alan

 

 

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No pics today, but I've cut out the remaining forecastle template in order to help align the bow sections.   Never again will I simply ram pieces of wood into a stem section and happily sand to what I feel is a pleasing shape. lol

 

Today I also found a yellowed piece of paper in my Triton folder, from "Australia" Dirk, who had given me advice when I was working through issues in my stern area years ago.  His advice was so good I printed it!   I thought I'd type it out below for future builders.....

-------------------------------------------------------

G'Day Alan,

 

Ok here are a few ideas for the stern.  You are going to need to build this up from a variety of drawings and some you might have to make templates for and use the trail and error method.  Use good card paper for this.

 

Basically you need to work off the quarter deck template, (plan below).  This is going to give you the deck camber, something you need to keep in mind and use it all the way. Remember it curves 2 ways port to starboard and viewing from above it curves fore and aft the other way too.  This quarter deck is seen so you need to get this right.  You will need to make up your own template for the gundeck extension. To do this place a temporary batten along the stern frames to give you a basic shape. You might need to make up a temporary stern board to do this.  Doesn't need to be curved fat piece will do the job at this state.  Use the line plans if necessary to get its final shape.  This gun deck extension doesn't need to be cambered as its covered and not seen but needs to be set in the right position otherwise the rear of the hull is going to be out of whack. 

 

The slope of the stern board is also important.  Use the plan below to give you this angle.  You might want to try bending some thin aircraft ply here, steam bending seems to work here but not all the time.  Again a template needs to be made here as its a fiddly  shape.  If the bent ply method doesn't work I would be using a solid balsa block and sanding thin the shape. You can always plank it later.  If you do plank it use the counter timbers plan.  They are another difficult shape to get right.  Don't force them laterally it doesn't work.  The planks bulge out and look bad. Sort of spiling and template method needs to be done here.  Get this bit right and it looks great. Mine didn't go all that well and needs to be done over.

 

The solid block ends under the quarter deck beam.  The taff rail above I made from a solid piece of timber.  Another difficult job.  If I had to do it over again I would make it up using a series of "spikes" drilled and glued into the solid block mentioned above, then plank the thing.  Maybe even use thin aircraft ply.  Where the stern chase guns go use a solid piece in either side so as you can bore them out later.  Don't drill them, it will splinter.  Get a few grinding stones for the Dremel and use them to bore your way through and finish up with one stone of the correct size.  You get no splinters using stones and the finish is smooth an looks great.  I use this for mast holes in decks also. Remember the stern chase gun ports are horizontal to the deck not at 90 degrees to the stern board.  Be careful and really concentrate here doing this job.

 

Should have mentioned before use the quarter light frame plans to get the outboard angles for the stern board.  the stern board angles vary across their width, the outermrost ones, (port and starboard) corners are more vertical then the centre stern board posts.  The outermost ones also slope inboard so watch for the angle changes.  The inner posts gradually go vertical.  I keep referring to them as posts but of course they are pars of the solid block. 

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  • 2 months later...

Thanks Aldo!

 

The lower deck has now been installed in the proper location. It just needs to be sanded smooth in advance of planking.  Also getting ready to order decking material.  I know the lower deck won't really be seen, but it will give me a chance to practice my planking, as I'm probably a bit rusty!   I do need to find a template/drawing which shows an actual planking diagram, however..  I don't "think" we have that in our template arsenal...

 

Alan

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