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HMS Bellerophon by flyer - Victory Models - scale 1:72

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Hi Peter -- Nice work on the hardest area!  You mention that the rails are cast -- what material are they cast from?  They look just like hand-grooved and shaped rails.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin

 

Nice to hear from you and thanks for the compliments.

Those rails are a white metal profiles, very soft, like tin-solder. And the same is used on the lower transom and side galleries.

 

Cheers

Peter

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Admiralty, water based yellow ochre with 15% white. I use the same paint trying to cover my built in flaws - not always successfully, alas. 😳

😊

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The hawse holes got additional bolsters to give more protection to the lower bow cheeks.

 

Then I tried to attach the cathead. Some corrections were necessary to achieve the required angles forward and upward. Short pieces of leftover deck planks were glued onto the sides to help to create a yellow- black pattern. After painting the starboard cathead, it was glued on. However after installation it seemed much too long, protruding too far. I can only assume that the length is calculated to install it through the bulkhead. So I took it off again and shortened it by about 10 mm and redecorated and painted it. Now it looked more to scale and I could attach the support which had to be reworked first as well, to match the angles of the hull side and the cathead.

 

Then pieces of the white metal profile were bent and put in place to finish the upper railing. Contrary to the instructions I continued the profile over the support and to the underside of the cathead. Several sources show a continuous decoration in this manner.

The head rail was shortened a bit to fit behind the upper check rail, painted and glued on. The starboard side was now finished but awaits some rework to smoothen the various bumps.

 

I painted the figurehead, puzzling over the instructions. Finally I decided to provide the hero with a golden helm instead of the bronze as instructed - he deserves it. Also the shin protection is golden, however I'm still unsure about their form and what parts to paint golden. The cast seems to indicate that also the calves were covered and that's strange. The breast was painted brown as instructed. Perhaps he had a light leather armour. The goat's head of the chimera is red, as seen on some illustrations. The still removable hero completes the impression of the starboard bow.

 

IMG_1915.jpg.71f7b54c219135cdb24ed12b89669e9d.jpg

a rather strong seaman holds the first variant of the unpainted cathead

 

 

IMG_1917.jpg.e935e62264c224a2a2c3864f2176842c.jpg

this looks disproportionate

 

 

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cathead 2.0 with support

 

 

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upper railing finished

 

 

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head rail added

 

 

 

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the successful hero holds the chimera's goat head - I still don't know, why he didn't take the lion head and what kind of strange weapon he holds in his right hand...

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Hi Peter -- Your choices for the paint scheme for Bellerophon seem appropriate, bronze would have been too dull.  And that weapon does look odd -- who knows.  Maybe it's supposed to be a kind of curved short sword.  As for the goat's head over the lion's, my guess is that the goat coming out of the back of the lion looked so ridiculous that Bellerophon cut it off to make the chimaera look more presentable.  And I have to envy that heroically narrow waist!

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi mate love your  work on Billy ruffian ( easier  to spell) I have  been  following  your build .

I have just started  my planking  but while I was waiting  I did the  figurehead  ,I didn't  like that sword  either  so I cut it off and added  the one off the vanguard .keep up the great  work  I hope mine turns out to be as good  as yours cheers snowy 

20191230_084628.jpg

20191230_084606.jpg

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Hi Snowy

 

A very clever idea and an equally successful sword transplantation - and the patient even is alive!

He probably used a sword to cut off the head, while he used a spear (with a lump of lead on the tip) to kill the beast. I'll think about a spear in his hand while trying to find out what he actually holds.

 

Stay cool!

Peter

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While working on the port side I tried to give the upper rail a more elegant run up to the cathead. Unfortunately I succeeded and knew I had to redo the starboard upper rail. Before I put the port head rail in place I  glued the head gratings in. I used walnut stain on them and added a 1x1 mm strip across the foremost part to cover the foremost bow rail frame entirely.

Then the starboard rail came off again and  - because Mr Murphy had time to pay a short visit - 3 bars of the grating with it. The new rail however looks much better now.

The figurehead got another layer of paint and a short search in the web revealed that Greek soldiers had metal  greaves as a shin protection. They were available in metal for the elite and anatomically formed and reached around to cover also the calves. In case of our hero they are not only metal but I offered also gilding which means I painted the entire lower legs golden.

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the port side upper rail looks more elegant

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with the head rail  added, the bow is almost complete

 

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the gratings in place

 

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the new starboard rail looks definitely better

 

IMG_1957.jpg.6f3a5462e000b34d20fb09804256e819.jpg

the skipper ponders about how to repair that grating

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The next problem was how to place the ornamental Pegasus between the bow cheeks - it was more than 1mm too high. After cutting away the laurels and bending the horses legs a bit it fit but looked very meagre. As an alternative I reworked the Vanguards respective element to fit, thinking with its serpent head it could represent the chimeras carcass with its snake tail. Then I took the snake Elephant's elephant was trampling and combined it, with the same idea in mind, with the slimmed Pegasus - this looked to be the best version.

The carpenter in the meantime had repaired the grating, installed the latrines or seats of ease and fixed the two knight heads on both sides of the provisional bowsprit.

Finally the skipper - always with the welfare of his crew in mind - wanted a rope rail installed above the head rail to prevent them falling overboard while being at ease.

 

IMG_1960.jpg.aef00ebaecff2663ed109be872190a76.jpg

a reworked element from Vanguard

 

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the final version with a part of Elephant and Bellerophons Pegasus

 

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the skipper examines the finished bow and criticizes the inadequate protection

 

IMG_1967.jpg.76ad88137a8478e777be5de93acd1657.jpg

rope rails added with some leftover stanchions

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Peter,

Been away the last couple of weeks – been following on my iPad, but forgot my login info haha – now back at home so I can post again to builds that I follow 🤔 Nice work

 

PS: The crew of my return flight let me upfront for taxi, climb to cruise - and then some - My first time in a B787 sweet machine. Start ups are - well - not the way I used to have to do them haha

 

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Thanks Michael

Had a discussion with a bank clerk about passwords. Even she uses the same for all her accounts and credit cards - it isn't "1234". So I feel justified to use the same few passwords for the accounts without safety risk. Don't ask me however, which one I use for MSW.

Never been on one of those plastic aircraft. But it seems an interesting concept, also when you consider all those fume events (extremely harmful oil residues from the engine lubrication system entering the cabin via traditional aircraft air conditioning systems) which happen again and again on other aircraft. But I don't thrust those composite hulls regarding ageing and especially small ground collisions (e.g. ramp vehicles overnight) because you probably won't see a trace of them in the morning although the damage will be there, within the layers of the material. But as long as they are new and the batteries don't have a thermal runaway - they are certainly great birds.

Cheers

Peter

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Peter,

 

Points well taken - and indeed the empirical data are not yet well seasoned in terms of 787 cycles. Yes ground collisions may be better hidden. After JALs batteries were catching fire (now as you know fixed) decided to buy BA - good call. I read a comprehensive article written by an engineer that questioned the ability of the 787 fuselage to hold together after a crash landing.  --- The Max, however is another all together diff. issue - might have some criminal potential.

PS: Sorry to take away from your log with these side comments - all done here

Cheers,

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Finishing the hull

 

Next was the starboard fore channel. Instead of wooden knees on top, the kit contains iron supports below to stabilize it. I'm not sure if this is historically correct but the Victory in the AOTS series book shows similar features. And they are in the same positions as the knees would be. So I followed the easy way and did as the manual told me.

Fortunately I found RMC's note about attaching the associated gun port lids together with the channel and could  avoid later difficulties.

 

A feature I wanted to add was the anchor lining or bolster. In the AOTS books Bellona and Pandora I found drawings to show some information about the form but there was still some guesswork needed to build them as historically correct as possible. Finally I tried to keep it simple while offering maximal protection for the chains without blocking the foremost gun too much.

 

IMG_1979.jpg.308e11ec1fc3392999862b8617ef53ad.jpgIMG_1985.jpg.f1bac4f408f2832c54e487efbbe7b6bd.jpg

 

It looks OK. The skipper came to enquire about the argument between the carpenter and his mate.

 

 

 

IMG_1982.jpg.d166adc12348dceb23003a3979382268.jpg

anchor lining

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