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IJN Battleship Mikasa by CDW - 1:200 scale - Plastic - Wave Models

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These little hand hold pieces could easily be knocked off and lost during the construction, painting, and detailing of the hull. To help prevent that, used some scrap styrofoam and cut a small channel in it, then taped it in place over the small details. That should keep everything in place while the rest of the photo etch details are added before painting.

 

Then, I need to decide how I am going to paint this model. It seems the Mikasa hull was originally painted black above the water line, red oxide below the WL, light gray superstructure, black funnels with light gray stripes. In other renditions of the model, I have seen it painted all gray. My only reference book states the colors formerly mentioned, so I think I will go with that VS the all gray. All gray seems rather dull to me and as long as there is a more colorful option that's authentic, I would rather go with that.

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Hi Craig,

 

Nice steady progress, enjoying following along. 

 

RE the colours I had the same dilemma, as I also prefer the earlier black and striped funnel colours. Hadn't heard of the all grey scheme. The colour pull out in my kit shows grey topside with oxide red lower hull which is the 1905 Battle of Tsushima colours.

 

When I get closer to building this one I may buy the Orel 1:200 card kit of the Mikasa to use as a colour reference as this kit is in the earlier black scheme.

 

looking forward to more.

 

Cheers

Slog

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I mis spoke saying, all gray. It's (the alternative color) actually as you said, gray topside and oxide red below WL.

There is a lot of detail that must be attached to the hull. I am thinking it may be easier and more practical to paint a lot of those details before attaching to the hull, such as the doors on the gun ports. 

 

 

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Just as an FYI...

 

The red arrows point to fore and aft 18" torpedo tubes in the hull of the Mikasa. Not sure how practical those would be in a combat situation, but I suppose they could discourage another ship lining up along side for a broadside shot. ;)

 

 

Torpedo Tubes.jpg

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When drilling several holes in plastic models (motorcycle brake disc vent holes scale 1:12) I have found that using a tool that you can hold like a pencil. Dremel or Proxxon multitool or a simple pin vice (I use Amatis), will put less stress sideways on the drill - thus less drill breakage

Shamrock

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The Pontos photo etch is quite remarkable and arguably the best in the business. If there is anything else out there (photo etch) that's better, I would like to know what it is and where to buy it so I can get me some.

Here, the otherwise barren stock plastic pieces are transformed by the Pontos photo etch magic. 

 

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I thought I would use the Tamiya color, NATO Black, to paint the hull. I like it because it has a hint of white in it that tones it down. However, once I tested the paint on some scrap, found it dries looking very "chalky" and I don't like it. I guess I will end up using Tamiya gloss black and mix in some white to get the tone I want. Everything will end up getting dull coat clear once all hull painting is done.

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As you may know, this 1:200 Mikasa kit is produced and sold under at least two labels, Merit, and Wave Models.

Today, I was talking to a hobby shop owner, asking if he could acquire a couple of different items for me. One of those items is the 1:200 Merit USS Hornet aircraft carrier kit.

Sad to say, but he advised his sources tell him that Merit is discontinuing all their warship line, all scales. 

As you may know, Merit, Wave, and Trumpeter are all the same thing, just in different boxes. But most ships are sold exclusively under one label. This Mikasa is the only exception I know, being boxed and sold both under the Wave Models label as well as the Merit label.

I'm only saying all this to give you a heads-up just in case you've been contemplating buying the 1:200 Mikasa model. Better get off the fence and do it now, or perhaps it won't be available later. Maybe it will come out (as the rest of the line) under a different label, I don't know. Sometimes better to be safe than sorry. Been there and done that.

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Ha - three different labels selling the same model. That's funny.

A good friend of mine does a lot of business in China. He takes his designs to their factories and they produce what he wants. It's not uncommon at all for the same factory to produce the same or very similar product for a number of different sellers. 

Many years ago here in the USA, I worked in a factory where we made car and industrial acid, wet cell batteries. We produced a huge number of batteries for different brand names, such as Sears Die Hard, Shell premium batteries, Caterpillar batteries, etc. All these were produced to their own exacting standards and had their own quality control standards. 

With plastic models, it just seems weird because there seems to be no difference except for maybe what language the instructions are printed. All the plastic and photo etch is the same.

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Hello Craig,

 

Just caught up with the progress of your Mikasa.  Most impressive so far. Seems that your metal etch kit has some foresight and included hole drilling patterns. I sympathize with your micro drll bit breakage. I bought a WECheer pencil type drill motor with collets that go from 0 to 1/8 inch shanks. Being the cheep - - mmm frugal, that's frugal - - :P  Dutchman I file a new point on the broken bit, as long as I have some flutes left in it. Goof enough for wood and plastic. Hey, an old machinist trick.

I'm patiently waiting for my Hr. Ms. Java kit to arrive in the mail. Other then that I started with the 1:30000 scale Young America.

 

Cheers,

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I need to try that dutchman trick of sharpening the tips of my broken bits. Never even tried to do it before. It must take a very fine file for that work, or maybe a fine sanding stick. What do you use?

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Hi Craig,

 

Yeah, I use a small file I still have from a previous life. The blade and tang are all one piece with the business end rough but rather fine rough, almost like a 360 grit. It seems to be made from tungsten or other super hard metal and does a nice job wearing away HSS (high-speed steel) without any problem. Not so good on wood though, except hard wood a little. I have also used a VERY fine cut-off wheel in the Dremmel and even a VERY fine aluminum oxide wheel in the Dremmel for the larger sizes like between #60 and 70. When you come to the really small size drills like the #80 you'd better have steady hands and a support, but it works.

I still prefer the little file, have more control over things. Try it and see if you can reuse some of the broken bits.

Here is another tool you may may try and that's a contacter or point file I used in aircraft or car ignition systems. I still have on in my toolbox. Hmmm, that just popped into my mind, I should put that one on my workbench :huh:

 

Cheers,

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One of the tasks I least liked to do, was removing raised details from decks and other surfaces on models I'm building.

When I saw that Micro Mark was having a summer sale on certain tools in their catalog, and noticed this electric powered chisel was one of them, I had to acquire one and try it out. I'm not sure how long Micro Mark has been carrying this tool in their inventory, but it was the first time I had seen it advertised. It seems to be a high quality tool, made in Japan. When you turn it on, a rotary motor begins to turn inside the tool. Once the blade comes in contact with an object to be cut, a vibratory action begins and the razor sharp blade cuts through the plastic like a hot knife through butter. Once you remove pressure from the blade, the vibratory action stops.

As the blade is very sharp, it will be important to make sure to keep the free hand and other objects clear of the potential path of the blade.

I tried the tool one one area of the Mikasa deck, and it made short work of a job that would have taken much much longer to do with just an X-Acto w/chisel blade.

Now, maybe I won't dread removing those raised details so much as before. 

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All the raised detail (marked with arrows) had to be removed from the Mikasa main deck to accommodate the wooden deck and details provided in the Pontos detail set.

With the new electric chisel, it took literally 10 minutes to complete the task. Doing this with a conventional X-Acto with chisel blade would have taken much, much longer. An hour or more.

 

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Our baby girl is now 20 years of age and in college. I take her to school every morning and pick her up in the afternoon. The commute back and forth is through some very extreme traffic conditions, and she is just not confident enough to make that drive herself. Plus, the campus has far more students than they do spaces for them to park. In the meantime, yard work has been high up on the admiral's agenda (when it's not raining). Between all these things, I work on the Mikasa now and then. Am going to try and pick up the pace a bit, soon. 

 

Thanks for dropping by to have a look.  

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Very nice Craig, looking good.

 

I am curious, did you use the suggested paints in the colour callout as I don't have much experiance on paints.  If I remember correctly the suggest paints and brands said they were semi-gloss; I wonder how they look in real life.

 

Cheers

Slog 

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Capt Slog

 

I was out of luck for the color call outs because the Wave Models version of the Mikasa was produced for the Asian market and has all the written material in Chinese. I have no idea what color they call for and just went by sight. After my clear cote goes on, (and even now without it) it will look satin rather than flat. The red is hull red from Vallejo and the "black" is black-gray from Vallejo.

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It's been almost a year since I last worked on the Mikasa. Decided it was maybe time to pick back up where I left off and hopefully, finish this model this time around. Need to study the plans a while before starting back up. Lots and lots of details and it would be easy to get out of sequence.

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