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Hello All,

       I didn't know where else to share this, but as a nautical history buff, I figured it's probably in this section. In my research over the years into the 70 gun Third Rate Elizabeth, having read her Captain's and Master's logs, I found that she was part of Admiral Shovell's last fleet command in the Mediterranean in 1707. As an artist and cartoonist, I've always gotten a kick out of the 'perfected' versions of the individuals being painted, and at the National Maritime Museum, there's a portrait of Admiral Shovell in a suit of black armor. From the accounts I've read, the Admiral enjoyed a fullness of body, if you follow me, and was by no account a thin person as depicted in the painting. From that starting point, I'd created a digital painting of what a drunk cartoonist might have ended up with, had he had the recklessness tp paint the Admiral with total abandon. It's my first digital painting, and you'll have to forgive the inaccuracies in the ship's masting and rigging - but here it is:

bhc3026 lo res.jpg

Sir Cloudesley Shovell lo res.jpg

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Bill

 

 I have been working on and off on drawings of Elizabeth 1706 for my next big project.  Alas, with work and other adventures it will likely be quite a while before making saw dust but at least I have been able to find some time to work on the drawings.  As I study the drawings of Elizabeth 1706 and Hampton Court 1709 that I have found, I would love to study the logs as well.   Are they prior to her 1737 rebuild to the 1733 Establishment?  Where can these be acquired? Any information you can share would be greatly appreciated and hopefully I can reciprocate in some way. 


Thanks

Allan

   

 

 

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I watched a show many years ago on Queen Elizabeth I. In it they mentioned that ALL portraits or paintings of her commissioned or otherwise had to follow very strict rules. There was a pattern that was distributed for her face that was a sheet of paper, with many small holes. The artist place this on the canvas and used powder to mark the hole pattern. Then he had to paint "within the lines". I assume that the body proportions had to match the face. Any painting found that did not meet the standards, or paint her beautiful, was subject to harsh punishment! The painting AND the artist's studio would be burnt! I forget what additional punishment the artist himself received.

 

So basically we know nothing about how she really looked, at least later in life.

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